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To the statistics already presented, we add the following table, showing the number of pupils present during each term of the school, through ts whole history :

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It appears from these statistics that the number of different pupils in attendance during the year is 313, or 36 more than last year; the number for the present term, 246, or 35 more than in the corresponding term of last year. The assemblyroom of the school-building contains 210 seats, and no more can be added. The senior class have been obliged this term to occupy one of the recitation-rooms. As the number of pupils already exceeds the accommodations of the building, it seems necessary to limit its further increase; and unless the Board shall otherwise order, the number rejected term by term, amounting hitherto to about one-fourth of the whole number of applicants, will be increased by raising still higher the standard of admission. This being a matter, however, of considerable moment, and involving a policy which may have wider application, the Visitors will be glad to be instructed by the Board.

The accounts of the principal, which are admirably kept, have been audited, and found to be correctly cast and properly vouched. The appropriation for the current expenses of the school was $12,000. The aggregate expenditure has been $12,471,77.

Respectfully submitted.

A. A. MINER,
PHILLIPS BROOKS,

Visitors.

WORCESTER.

eculiarli, studleyp eciall

The Visitors of the Worcester Normal School report that the school is in successful operation. With the exception of the teacher of music, the instructors in the school are the same persons mentioned in the report of 1875, with the addition of three, who are named in the statement which follows. The school has been visited by numerous persons interested in its success, some of whom have favored the pupils with interesting and practical suggestions. Among these, he addresses of Gardiner G. Hubbard, Esq., on Rome, and Rev. A. D. Mayo upon Beauty in the School-room, were especially interesting.

The lectures of Miss M. J. Studley were highly prized by the pupils, and were peculiarly appropriate. The statistics of the school appear in the following statement:

The number of applicants for admission to this school during the year is 89, of whom 53, about sixty per cent., passed the preliminary examination, and were admitted. Their average age was 17.9 years. There was only one young man among the number. Sixteen had previously taught school; 47—almost vine-tenths—were residents of the county; and 27-more than one-half—of the city of Worcester. Hampden County sent two; Middlesex, Plymouth, and Nantucket, one each ; and one came from the State of New Hampshire.

Residences in detail : Worcester, 27; Agawam, Blackstone, Northbridge, Barre, Grafton, Templeton, 2 each ; Duxbury, Fitchburg, Hopkinton, Millville, Nantucket, Oakham, Shrewsbury, Gardner, Spencer, Uxbridge, Westborough, West Boylston, Winchendon, 1 each ; Concord, N. H., 1.

The fathers of the pupils are by occupation as follows: Mechanics, 16; farmers, 13; manufacturers, 5; boarding-house keepers, 3; merchants, 3 ; barber, book-keeper, draughtsman, engineer, miller, overseer, physician, painter, real estate broker, salesman, tanner, teacher, teamster, 1 each.

The number of pupils admitted since the opening of the school, in September, 1874, is 122. Of these, 29 have withdrawn for various reasons, leaving the present number 93, who are divided into three classes, as follows: first class, 28 ; second class, 18; third class, 47.

The library has been increased by the purchase of 592 volumes of text-books, and 457 volumes of reference books.

Some illustrative apparatus for the teaching of drawing, of physiology, etc., has been supplied, and additions to this are continually made.

A chemical laboratory, accommodating eighteen working pupils, and supplied with gas-hood, Bunsen pump, tables, sinks, etc., has been fitted up, at an expense of about $300; and the necessary supplies have been provided, at a cost of about $500. Not far from $300 has also been expended for philosophical apparatus.

By the generous coöperation of the school authorities of the city of Worcester, an arrangement has been made whereby pupils of the Normal School may, in their senior year, be assigned, as assistants or apprentices, to superior teachers in the Public Schools, and may thus have real practice in the instruction and management of school children, under the joint supervision of the city superintendent of schools and the faculty of the Normal School. This is a tual reacting. The conditions are stern, but helpful; and it is believed that an experiment so carefully sifted of artificial encumbrances, will yield something of value. The undertaking will be diligently carried on and closely watched, and a detailed report of its working will in due time be offered.

Constant attention is paid to the health of the students, a majority of whom report themselves as improved in this respect soon after entering the school. It cannot be denied, however, that too many come with physical constitutions seriously impaired by the confinement and the stress of work and worry that so burdens the scholars in our Public Schools; and it is often a perplexing question, in individual cases, whether the State can wisely invest money where invalidism seems the almost sure destiny of the student.

The services of three additional teachers have been engaged during the year; namely, Miss Juliet Porter, formerly teacher in Le Roy (N. Y.) Academy, and a graduate of the Normal School at Framingham; Mr. Michael J. Green, of Boston, a student in the Normal Art-School, and holder of " Diploma A”; and Mr. Henry W. Brown, a Harvard graduate, late classical teacher in the Worcester High School

A short course of instruction in a special department of physiology has been given, with much advantage to the pupils, by Miss Mary J. Studley, M. D.

Memorandum of the Sanitary Regimen of the State Normal

School at Worcester. Recognizing the physical integrity and well-being of our pupils as an indispensable prerequisite to their success, either as scholars or teachers, we postpone the care of their health to no other duty whatever. This often involves a sacrifice of present progress in study ; but, unless we discredit the most emphatic teachings of those best qualified to judge, it is the part of wisdom.

Our aim is, first, to instruct the students in the care of their health ; and, secondly, to make it easy for them to put such instruction into practice.

To this end we try, first, to gain a full knowledge of every pupil's actual state of health ; secondly, to regulate and temper his or her habits accordingly; and, thirdly, to watch the results. We endeavor to ascertain, with due delicacy, the facts bearing upon the following points, with reference to all students, not only at their admission to the school, but from time to time throughout their course :1. Weight.

5. Eyesight. 2. Height.

6. Hearing. 3. Chest-girth.

7. Appetite. 4. Waist-girth.

8. Sleep.

The following questions are also asked at the time of admission :

1. Have you had serious or protracted illness within two years ? If so, state, as fully as you choose, the particulars about it, and especially whether you have fully recovered.

2. Have you a tendency or liability to any particular form of disease; for example, neuralgia, headache, or sore throat? If so, state, as fully as you choose, what the disease is, and what you do to avoid it.

3. What is the name and address of the physician usually employed in your family?

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