Lugard in Hong Kong: Empires, Education and a Governor at Work 1907-1912

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Hong Kong University Press, 1992~81 - 232
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Sir Frederick Lugard ranks as one of Britains most distinguished colonial administrators, although he remains a controversial figure. During his five years as Governor of Hong Kong -- a brief spell in the middle of a long and dramatic career in Africa -- Lugard found in educational reform the scope he needed to make a lasting impression and give play to his imperialist theories and instincts. The University of Hong Kong owes its existence to the initiative and tenacity of Lugard. His purpose in founding the University was to produce a new, highly educated middle class trained in Western technology and the English language: a vanguard of increased British influence in the east. This book paints a very human picture of Lugard as a working governor in the relative stability of Hong Kong against a backdrop of the Chinese empire being torn apart by revolution.
 

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Tendencies and Forces
1
1 The Lugards
7
2 Big Subjects and Solemn Things
15
3 Great Talk of Reforms
25
4 Universities in the Air
35
5 Hong Kong Education
43
6 Anxious to Succeed
55
7 The General Objects in View
65
12 Private Munificence and Public Spirit
115
13 Let All Tremble and Obey
123
14 The Ordeal
133
15 The Ordinance and a Petition
141
16 First in the Field
151
17 Pathephone the Scenic Railway and Home
161
Universities of the Empire
171
Notes to Chapters
179

8 An Unfortunate Incident on a Boat
75
9 Endowment
85
10 No Pernicious Doctrines
93
11 Materialism and Morality
103
Sources
188
Biographical Index
193
Index
207

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