Historical analysis of Christian civilisation

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J. Chapman, 1850 - 502 頁
 

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第 2 頁 - For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off. It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it ? neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go over the sea for us, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it? but the word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou mayest do it.
第 458 頁 - ... the bottom of the sea ; a wild land of barrenness and lava ; swallowed many months of every year in black tempests, yet with a wild gleaming beauty in summertime ; towering up there, stern and grim, in the North Ocean ; with its...
第 137 頁 - And, lastly (which alone would have merited the title that it bears, of the great charter), it protected every individual of the nation in the free enjoyment of his life, his liberty, and his property, unless declared to be forfeited by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land.
第 462 頁 - Monmouth, at the head of some troops from England, had routed them at Bothwell Bridge. These zealots were most numerous among the rustics of the western lowlands, who were vulgarly called Whigs. Thus the appellation of Whig was fastened on the Presbyterian zealots of Scotland, and was transferred to...
第 462 頁 - Those zealots were most numerous among the rustics of the western lowlands, who were vulgarly called Whigs. Thus the appellation of Whig was fastened on the Presbyterian zealots of Scotland, and was transferred to those English politicians who showed a disposition to oppose the court, and to treat Protestant Nonconformists with indulgence. The bogs of Ireland, at the same time, afforded a refuge to popish outlaws, much resembling those who were afterwards known as Whiteboys.
第 159 頁 - Greek empire in 1453, the era of the revival of letters, and the commencement of civilization. A certain consequence of the crusades was the change of territorial property in all the feudal kingdoms, the sale of the estates of the nobles, and their division among a number of smaller proprietors. Hence the feudal aristocracy was weakened, and the lower classes began to acquire weight, and a spirit of independence. The towns, hitherto bound by a sort...
第 196 頁 - For in his time the law did receive so sudden a perfection, that sir Matthew Hale does not scruple to affirm ', that more was done in the first thirteen years of his reign to settle and establish the distributive justice of the kingdom, than in all the ages since that time put together.
第 448 頁 - Fortis juventus, virtus audax bellica, Vestra per muros audiantur carmina; Et sit in armis alterna vigilia, Ne fraus hostilis haec invadat moenia. Resultet echo: "Comes, eja, vigila", Per muros: "Eja", dicat echo: "Vigila.
第 198 頁 - III. ; and justices of the peace were established instead of the latter. In the reign also of Edward the Third the parliament is supposed most probably to have assumed its present form ; by a separation of the commons from the lords. The statute for defining and ascertaining treasons was one of the first productions of this new-modelled assembly : and the translation of the law proceedings from French into Latin another. Much also was done, under the auspices of this magnanimous prince, for establishing...
第 408 頁 - ... detail of the methods best suited to prosecute improvements and new discoveries. The world owes to Bacon the sure method of advancing in knowledge by experiment and the observation of nature, instead of system and conjecture. " Bacon, said Horace Walpole, has been the prophet of truths that Newton came to reveal to mankind. True; but between Bacon and Newton, a man arose who followed the track of Bacon, and inflicted a mortal blow on all...

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