The Works of Adam Smith: The nature and causes of the wealth of nations

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T. Cadell, 1811

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I
1
II
33
IV
46
V
73
VI
81
VII
99
VIII
117
IX
138
X
139
XI
176
XII
209
XIII
252
XIV
261
XV
323
XVI
343
XVII
485

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第 181 頁 - ... every individual necessarily labours to render the annual revenue of the society as great as he can. He generally, indeed, neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it.
第 181 頁 - By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security ; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain; and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention.
第 16 頁 - It tends therefore to increase the exchangeable value of the annual produce of the land and labour of the country. It puts into motion an additional quantity of industry, which gives an additional value to the annual produce.
第 2 頁 - That subject, or, what is the same thing, the price of that subject, can afterwards, if necessary, put into motion a quantity of labour equal to that which had originally produced it. The labour of the menial servant, on the contrary, does not fix or realize itself in any particular subject or vendible commodity. His services generally perish in the very instant of their performance, and seldom leave any trace or value behind them for which an equal quantity of service could afterwards be procured.
第 182 頁 - It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy.
第 186 頁 - Whether the advantages which one country has over another be natural or acquired, is in this respect of no consequence. As long as the one country has those advantages, and the other wants them, it will always be more advantageous for the latter rather to buy of the former than to make.
第 484 頁 - It is a very singular government in which every member of the administration wishes to get out of the country, and consequently to have done with the government, as soon as he can, and to whose interest, the day after he has left it and carried his whole fortune with him,* it is perfectly indifferent though the whole country was swallowed up by an earthquake.
第 244 頁 - Commerce, which ought naturally to be, among nations as among individuals, a bond of union and friendship, has become the most fertile source of discord and animosity.
第 22 頁 - The uniform, constant, and uninterrupted effort of every man to better his condition, the principle from which public and national, as well as private opulence is originally derived...
第 80 頁 - According to the natural course of things, therefore, the greater part of the capital of every growing society is, first, directed to agriculture, afterwards to manufactures,. and last of all to foreign commerce.

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