Surviving Capitalism: How We Learned to Live with the Market and Remained Almost Human

封面
Anthem Press, 2005 - 198 頁
'Surviving Capitalism presents a highly literate cost-benefit analysis of the history of capitalism...fresh, fascinating, relevant, and, yes, humane.'
"Jeff Madrick, Editor, Challenge Magazine"
Human life cannot be reduced to market transactions and human beings cannot only be treated as economic actors. When the power of the market increases, human beings will always try to protect themselves. Given the differences that exist in social and cultural traditions, these protective responses are likely to differ from one society to the other. This is why, even in a global market, diversity is always likely to persist.
This book investigates the question of economic globalization - whether it is likely to lead to full convergence between political models and ways of life, or whether, even in a completely globalized world economy, there is likely to be scope for alternative solutions.
 

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內容

The Inevitability and Inhumanity of Capitalism
3
How Society Protects Itself
17
The European Idea of the Home
31
The Chinese Family
43
European Sects Guilds and Trade Unions
57
Japanese Business Corporations
71
Personal Thais and How They Survived the Boom
83
Versions of the European State
95
The State in China and Japan
109
How We Survived Capitalism
123
The Coming Crisis
135
Notes
147
Bibliography and Websites
167
Index
189
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關於作者 (2005)

Erik Ringmar is a Professor at the National Chiao Tung Unviersity, Hsinchu, Taiwan. He is the author of 'Interest, Identity & Action' (CUP 1996), as well as many academic articles in the fields of history, international politics and sociology.

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