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part, renewed application to that armoury child-like is not seeking to be vise above the weapons from which alone he fears, what is written, and to be man-like in the and by which he is conquerable. Again, let vigour of our purpose-to be wise fully up us reinember that God works by secondary to the measure of what is written; to be causes--that each oť us in our respective humble enough to pause at the line which vocations, and with respect to the ame- separates truth from conjecture, and the lioration of the world, are these secondary revealed from the hilden, content to hold causes--that we owe to our successors the our thoughts in aheyance with a hope of debts incurred to our predecessors-that clearer manifestation hereafter, and yet to we are l'esponsible to those who follow be determined to know all within that line for the safe transmission of the secular that may be known; to spare no pains in and religious blessings which have de- the search, and to tax our faculties to the scended to and been entailed upon us, utmost in scaling the heights and exploring along with such additions to them as the depths of that which has been revealed from our position and advantages might --these are not inconsistent traits, but be fairly expected. Above all, and finally, blend harmoniously in forming the true let none despund, and think that his ideal of the Christian habit and life. services are of no avail-that he has no But there is a deeper harmony still mission, no vocation from God—that he hidden in this paradox. Not only is the can contribute no item, however small, to spirit of child-hood and the spirit of manthe amelioration of the world that he can hood not inconsistent with each other, but hasten in no degree 'the good time con- their union is essential to the highest ing.'

moral or intellectual culture. The human mind never is so great as when it humbles

itself, in child-like humility, to be a CHILD-LIKE AND MAN-LIKE. learner at the feet of Divine wisdom. It

taxes the strength of the understanding, There is a large and impressive class

not only to acquire knowledge, but reof scriptural prescriptions which enjoin quires a still higher exertion of mental inthe cultivation of a child-like temper and

trepidity, to discover and to respect the disposition ; while another class urge the limits of human attainment. It is one of stedfastness, energy, and wisdom of man- the finest indications of a truly vigorous hood. Our Lord's grand exemplar of fit and disciplined mind, to discover the bonn. ness for the kingdom of heaven was a little daries of knowledge, and to adopt and child; Paul's confident appeal to those observe the modest purpose of keeping whom he addressed was unto 'wise men.'

strictly within them. It requires here In one strain we are enjoined to cast down

the man to be the child. It is only after our own reasonings and thoughts in reli- deep reflection upon the limited nature of gious things; in another to have our facul- the human powers, and the stern necessity ties exercised by the habit of close discri- imposed upon us, by our very position in mination between good and evil, and are the moral universe, that we can discern the commanded to take nothing upon trust propriety of deferring to the wisdom of the and authority, but to prove all things. Bible. So that while it is child-like to be At one time, cautioned not to think vur

humble, it is no less man-like; and while selves wise, lest we become fools ; at an

the spirit which our Lord defines to be the other, called upon to scrutinize the mes

characteristic spirit of heaven is the best sages of God, and to judge even an apostle's quality that can adorn the heart, it is not announcements.

less the highest intellectual trait that can This apparent inconsistency hides a pro- distinguish the understanding.

In the found and beautiful harmony, have the spirit both of the child and of the impressive language of Dr Chalmers, “next Sensible of our native ignorance in

to the positive knowledge of things that regard to the truths and realities of the is to know how to be ignorant; and the

may be known, the most important science spiritual life, and profoundly sensible of golden maxim of what may be called the our dependence upon the teachings of a logic of theology, seems to be to know that higher wisdom than our own, the spirit of

we cannot know certain things.' child-like docility and submissiveness is the temper which most betits our condition. But at the same time, the spirit of manly resolution to master the lessons which are

THE CRY FROM THE CROSS. 1 thus given--to search the depths of scriptural treasures, and ascertain the meaning We know those doeply solemn words of their messages, and, not content with which burst from the lips of the dying knowing their simplest and most elemen- Jesus - My God, my God, why bast thou tary principles, to go on unto perfection- forsaken me!' as no sudden and casual is as much our duty and right. To be result of the agonies of the Cross. The

man.

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prophet's ear had heard them one thou- / which carried the full burden of that need sand years before they passed the lips of which brought Christ to the cross. the dying Jesus. They speak of an agony, These words of the dying Jesus are not not only pressing upon the mind of the words for a human mouth. There was willing victim for our sins; but foreknown but One who could make an atonement for 80 to press upon Him as our sacrifice, as sin: there has been but One who could a necessary part of the duty He had under understand the full heinousness of sin in taken, part of the work which His Father the sight of the pertect God. had given Him to do. When He opened But the sense of abandonment may be the understanding of His disciples after expected by every sinner, when it rested His return from the grave, “that they thús upon the sinner's Substitute. Some might understand the Scriptures' (Luke have even said, that this sense of abandonxxiv. 45), He reminded them of His pre- ment must rest, of necessity, upon every vious reference to prophecy - These are child of Adam, before he can know the the words that I spake unto you, while I mercy purchased for him on the crosswas yet with you, that all things must be that he must pass through death unto lite fultilled, which were written in the law of —that he must first, not only die unto sin, Moses and in the prophets, and in the but die under sin, before he can bu born Psalms concerning Me (Luke xxiv. 44). again of the Spirit unto righteousness. Thus it is written, and thus it behoveth This seems, however, not only a sweeping Christ to suffer' (verse 46); the necessity declaration, which is scarcely authorized of the suffering being more than the fulfil- by Scripture, but as lessening the efficacy ment of prophecy; a necessity arising from of the atonement—as though there were the nature of the work which the Christ still a need of something inore than the had undertaken. Thus it is written ;' atonement. Were the atonement acThis cry from the cross is as much a por- cepted, as it was offered, 'once for all,'tion of fore-ordained redemption, as the did the lust of the flesh not remain in the other details which David has given (Ps. regenerate—did they who come to the xxii. 6) of the reproachings of men, by cross always retain their hold upon itwhich the cross would be surrounded; of there were no need to know how utterly the staring and mocking crowd (verse 17) alien sin is from the Divine Nature, no

of the parted and allotted garments of need to have the conviction of sin followed the One (verse 18) whom they enclosed; by the sense of a cloud between us and and upon whose pierced hands and feet God. The Christ is revealed; the cross they idly gazed. David had other views is upreared; the burden of our sin bas of that scene: the tongue cleaving to the been borne there ; the curse upon our sin jaws (Ps. lxix. 21), with that thirst which taken off; and, whilst there is the full sense formed the special suffering of crucifixion, of deserved abandonment, the child of and which brought on the last fulfilled de- Adam may rejoice in his freedom from the tail; when in His thirst they gave Him curse which Christ bore for him. We see vinegar to drink, and Jesus could say, 'It this often in the little heirs of glory, who is finished' (John xix. 30). David fore- soon find the climate of this cold world knew, also, the treachery of the familiar unsuited to their warmer hearts. Sin has friend (Ps. xli. 9), who should seek his no fears for thein; they know the sin, and Master in His private haunts, and mark they know the atonement; and they are Him out to His enemies by a kiss : and too glad and too sure of the atonement, to that forsaking of friends, and the more have any fears on account of the sin thus full view which Zechariah had, five hun- removed. And, as we approach most dred years later, of the very price of the nearly to this pattern-to which Jesus betrayal (Zech. xi. 12), and of the full scat- says all have need to come before they can tering of the little flock of followers (Zech. enter his kingdom--we have less of the xiii. 7), were not so much essential ele- personal burden of sin to bear. ments in the sufferings of the Christ, as Still, were the sense of abandonment this cry

from the cross. We may say, in- present, no human mouth can say, Why is deed, that all prophecy, from the comfort this? The Sinless One might ask, whether of the sinning Eve in her promised seed, it was needful that even this last and bitthrough all the gathered people which terest drop of His cup of suffering should should be His people, through all the be taken; but no sinful one. It would figures of their preparatory law, even up to evidence a soul in great danger, were the naming of the time when Messiah the there a question upon the cause of God's prince should be cut off, but not for Him- light withdrawn. "It would imply either self (Dan. ix. 26), and up to the last pro- an ignorance of the man's own heart, or phecy, that the Lord should 'suddenly an ignorance of the Gospel ; it would imcome to His temple’ (Mal. iii. 1), imme- ply that he had never brought his heart to diately after His messenger ; we may say the test of the only word of truth. Every that all were introductory to these words awakened child of God has ample reason to discover for every chastening that his merriment of the condenined in the place Father may lay upon him; and, were even of their everlasting sentence. We feel this heaviest chastening to be--were he, deep sorrow over the determined drupk. as we know has been with many an earnest ard, who drowns all recollection and all one, like Cowper-were he to believe him- fear in unchecked intoxication. And yet, self utterly an outcast, forsaken beyond as we look upon such wretched ones, we hope, fore-ordained to perish_far from dare not say that God has abandoued them. raising the 'why' against the justice of his Shall we dare to say that God has forsaken God and Father, his word would only be them ? Shall any one dare to say that God that of Paul, ‘Christ Jesus came into the is withdrawn for ever? Why that utter world to save sinners, of whom I am chief' wretchedness? why that fear of conscience? (1 Tim. i. 15), or that of Job, “Though He if God has forsaken them. They are not slay me, yet will. I trust in Him (Job let alone : life is made an utter misery to xiii. 15).

them, that they may see what a thing Should this fear come upon the human man-called pleasure is—that they may breast-should there be an enemy to whis- know this world as not their rest-that per that there is no hope for the soul — they may remember, with the prodigal. that sins such as these known ones must the peaceful home of earlier years; and have long closed up mercy-- let the trem- may yet, with the prodigal, return home. bling one take refuge even in these solemn ward to find their loving Father ready to words from the cross. Did Christ su en- meet them, whilst yet a great way off, with tirely stand in the place of my sin, was He a kind voice and with outstretched arms. 80 entirely made sin for me, that He bore Not so the let alone,' with whom all is the sense of my sins' abandonnent ? Was peace--the false peace, which has to kuow this amazing effort of love God's own ar- an awful disturbance some day. They are rangement, that I might have a perfect not judging themselves by the holiness of atonement ? Has this been written for God, not by the purity of His word, but my learning? And have I been spared to by a contrast with the defilements of the hear it, and brought to hear it

And can

worst of mankind. They are entirely I believe myself forsaken? And thus the satisfied with themselves, and with their treinbliog sinner will gradually dare to hopes and prospects. They have deterrest upon the merits of another's righteous- mined that God rewards the good, and ness; and the sense of his own deserved that they are the good, and thus secure of sentence will only make his gratitude and God's rewards. They can at any time ap. love the more earnest: he will feel the peal to the respectability of their lives as inore constrained to live to Him who died proof of their hope. And, with these unfor him. It was the intense knowledge happy rejecters of divine teaching, chaswhich Paul had of his own sin, which tening is valueless. If they lie long upon made the depth of his love : ' By the grace a sick-hed, they complain of the strangeof God I am what I am.' He would have ness of such a visitation to them; they can been nothing, had not God's grace con- understand the sufferings which the sinner verted and saved him.

brings upon himself, but theirs is a hardAnd as no human mouth could use ship. And as the suffering goes on, they these words--so we may observe, that the found a hope upon it, to add to the hope condemned do not usually expressa founded on their virtue, They quote sense of abandonment. The sense of Scripture in the true spirit of their father, great sin, the fear of abandonment, be- and say, that the sufferings of this world longs to the hopeful heart, in which the work out an exceeding and eternal weight Spirit is awakening the most sure emo- of glory; and, as they have suffered so tions to lead to the cross. Where aban- much, they are sure of glory. It is vain donment is, there is usually no expreesed to talk to them of chastisement unused and fear, no told sense of it. And so it would thus unprofitable : here is no present Spirit naturally be. Abandonment is the with to quicken the conscience. "And so the drawal of the Spirit, the awful sentence state of the soul goes on, becoming darker carried out— Let him alone;' and, when and darker, even up to the final hour of let alone, the conscience is not at work, life, when there is either the certainty of the conscience is not awakened, nor dis- restoration, which will never come, or an turbed. This is the most fearful state in utter indifference to the sure sentence, which to see the forsaken soul. We, in gene- which will so soon be. How unenviable ral, are most horror-stricken by the certain is a peace like this! It is like the swift, fearful looking for of judgment of which smooth glide of the waters before the Paul speaks, which results from the sense awful rush of the cataract. Up to the of being torsaken. We trenible at the loud very brink of the falls, they are unbroken shriek of laughter, which gives us more and unruftled,-a moment more, and the idea of torment than of pleasure ; which they foam and seethe in the whirlpool gives us some idea of what will be the below!

but shivering in the face of the northern THOUGHTS ON DEATH.

blast. Decrepid old age hovers by the 'Leaves have their time to fall,

blazing fireside, and unconsciously shrugs And flowers to wither at the north wind's his shoulders, as the keen winds go whistbreath,

ling by. Even here, in the cheerful home And stars to set, but all

circle, the unbidden guest enters. Gently Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O

he takes the hand of the old man, and death!'

leads him along to the portals of the grave. SPRING comes ! The barren nakedness Truly hast thou all seasons for thine own, of winter is exchanged for a bright, new O death! Thou dost pluck the early garb of verdant foliage; the violet springs buds of spring, culling, too, the flower of up by the road-side; the cowslip blooms summer; thou gatherest together the sere by the rivulet; the birds carol sweetly and yellow leaves of automn, and even the among the trees, and build their nests in barren, leafless branches of winter. Into the branches. How vivifying, how re- the every day routine of life thou enterest freshing to the mind is this delightful -no place too sacred for thee; thou change; how pleasirg to see the fair earth snatchest the brimming cup of happiness released from her bondage, to see her icy from the lips of man; thou robbest him fetters melted away, and to feel the genial of all that makes life dear; thou claimest influence of a glad spring morning! It all for thine own. No human hand can revives old hopes in the heart of man; for ward off thy approach; no door so closed when in the seed-time of life we naturally but thou canst enter; no station so high look forward to the harvest. But, ah! we but thou canst reach it; no hut so lowly may not always see the fulfilment of our but thou deignest to enter. The infant hopes! When earth is bright, and all that nestles on its mother's arm, the

young nature sends up hymns of thanksgiving maiden just ripening into womanhood, the and praise, then are human hearts made hale, hearty man in the meridian of life, sad, and then arises the mournful dirge and feeble, tottering age-all, all are laid for the dying. The tender flower is rent as offerings on thy shrine. from the parent stalk, and its budding loveliness is laid away in the cold earth, 'to wither and fade as the flower of the field.'

THE EDITOR'S LIBRARY. The bland smile, and balmy breath of

•WAY WEEPEST TAQU?' By John MACFARLANE, June, is succeeded by the sultry atmos

LL.D. London: Nisbet & Co. pbere of summer; and modest, retiring nature seems to shrink froin the ardent We have always attributed tho great gaze of a midsummer sun. The birds are charm of Dr Macfarlane's style, and the no longer upon the wing, but chirp quietly true cause of his growing popularity as an in the shade; the petals of the gaudy- author, to the hearty earnestness and hued flowers are closed, and, save the anxiety so transparent in all he writes, drowsy hum of the bee, all is quiet. Out really to enforce instruction and administer upon the hushed air tolls the sad, funeral comfort. With the hand of a master be knell, each peal reverberating, so that all brings to his aid lengthened and varied may catch the thrilling sound.

experience, forcible and eloquent illustraWe may possess rare charms. may be tion, singular powers of observation, and rich in the gifts of fortune, may be blessed true Christian philanthropy. It is maniwith the brightest gifts of intellect and fest that he has a matured practical design genius, but they avail nothing against the in each individual work he publishes, so power of the destroyer, for death loves a

that they become separately but parts of shining mark.'

a comprehensive whole, which, when comThe trees are bending beneath their pleted, may be published under such a load of golden fruit, the wheat is ready general title as The Earnest Pastor's for the sickle, the grain for the garner, Manual.' His ‘Mountains of the Bible, and the husbandman delights in the le- at once arrest sympathy and attention, by ward of his toil. Here, too, is another the fascinations of thrilling narrative and gleaner!

Here stalks, the grim, ganut eloqnent description, these being most figure of relentless death. Unsparingly he skilfully turned to account for the grand gathers of the choicest fruits and flowers ; purpose of insidiously inculcating throughhis desires are insatiable, for his garner, out the most important of all truths, and the charnel-house, is never filled, though these often so clearly intertwined as unhe adds daily to its hoards.

questionably to give evidence of a mind Hoary old winter is here again. The thoroughly conversant with the innumerlakes and rivers congeal at his approach; able tortuous freaks and follies of the the earth is clad in a mantle of snow. human heart. Hardy man strides on, enveloped in furs, Again, in «The Hiding Place,' we have

to discover for every chastening that his merriment of the condenined in the pla Father may lay upon him; and, were even of their everlasting sentence. We fi this heaviest chastening to be-were he, deep sorrow over the determined dru as we know has been with many an earnestard, who drowns all l'ecollection ant one, like Cowper--were he to believe him. / fear in unchecked intoxication. Apr self utterly an outcast, forsaken beyond as we look upon such wretched on hope, fore-ordained to perish - far from dare not say that God has abandover raising the 'why' against the justice of his Shall we dare to say that God has f God and Father, his word would only be them? Shall any one dare to say that of Paul, Christ Jesus came into the is withdrawn for ever? Why world to save sinners, of whom I am chief' | wretchedness? why that fear of co (1 Tim. i. 15), or that of Job, “Though He if God has forsaken them. Th slay me, yet will. I trust in Him (Job let alone : life is made an utte xiii. 15).

them, that they may see wh Should this fear come upon the human man-called pleasure is—that breast-should there be an enemy to whis know this world as not the per that there is no hope for the soul they may remember, with that sins such as these known ones must the peaceful home of earli. have long closed up mercy- let the trem may yet, with the prodigal. bling one take refuge even in these solemn ward to find their loving) words from the cross. Did Christ su-en meet them, whilst yet a gi tirely stand in the place of my sin, was He a kind voice and with ou so entirely made sin for me, that He bore Not so 'the let alone,' the sense of my sins' abandonment ? Was peace-the false peace, ! this amazing effort of love God's own ar | an awful disturbance so rangement, that I might have a perfect not judging themselves atonement ? Has this been written for God, not by the purit my learning? And have I been spared to by a contrast with the hear it, and brought to hear it? And can worst of mankind. I believe myself forsaken? And thus the satisfied with thems treinbliny sinner will gradually dare to hopes and prospect rest upon the merits of another's righteous- mined that God re ness; and the sense of his own deserved that they are the ga sentence will only make his gratitude and God's rewards. T love the more earnest: he will feel the peal to the respect inore constrained to live to Him who died proof of their hoy for him. It was the intense knowledge happy rejecters which Paul had of his own sin, which tening is valuele made the depth of his love : ‘By the grace a sick-bed, they of God I am what I am. He would have ness of such a been nothing, had not God's grace con- understand the verted and saved him,

brings upon h And as no human mouth could use ship. And as these words-so we may observe, that the found a hope condemned do not usually express a founded on sense of abandonment. The sense of Scripture in great sin, the fear of abandonment, be and say, th longs to the hopeful heart, in which the work out a Spirit is awakening the most sure emo of glory; tions to lead to the cross. Where aban much, the donment is, there is usually no expressed to talk to fear, no told sense of it. And so it would thus unp naturally be. Abandonment is the with- to quick drawal of the Spirit, the awful sentence state of carried out—'Let him alone;' and, when and da let alone, the conscience is not at work, life, wl the conscience is not awakened, nor dis restor turbed. This is the most fearful state in utter which to see the forsaken soul. We, in gene- whic! ral, are most horror-stricken by the certain is a fearful looking for of judgment of which sm Paul speaks, which results from the sense awf of being torsaken. We tremble at the loud | vei shriek of laughter, which gives us more an the idea of torment than of pleasure ; which th gives us some idea of what will be thelb

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