Construction Construed, and Constitutions Vindicated

封面
The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1998 - 344 頁
Taylor, John. Construction Construed and Constitutions Vindicated. Richmond: printed by Shepherd & Pollard, 1820. iv, 344pp. Reprinted 1998 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 97-49411. ISBN 1-886363-43-9. Cloth. $65. * One of the major works of the Virginian John Taylor of Caroline [1753-1824]. Little-known today, Taylor's work is of great significance in the political and intellectual history of the South and is essential for understanding the constitutional theories that Southerners asserted to justify secession in 1861. Taylor fought in the Continental army during the American Revolution and served briefly in the Virginia House of Delegates and as a U.S. Senator. It was as a writer on constitutional, political, and agricultural questions, however, that Taylor gained prominence. He joined with Thomas Jefferson and other agrarian advocates of states' rights and a strict construction of the Constitution in the political battles of the 1790s. His first published writings argued against Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton's financial program. Construction Construed and Constitutions Vindicated was Taylor's response to a series of post-War of 1812 developments including John Marshall's Supreme Court decision in McCulloch v. Maryland, the widespread issuance of paper money by banks, proposals for a protective tariff, and the attempt to bar slavery from Missouri. Along with many other Southerners, Taylor feared that these and other measures following in the train of Hamilton's financial system, were undermining the foundations of American republicanism. He saw them as the attempt of an "artificial capitalist sect" to corrupt the virtue of the American people and upset the proper constitutional balance between state and federal authority in favor of a centralized national government. Taylor wrote, "If the means to which the government of the union may resort for executing the power confided to it, are unlimited, it may easily select such as will impair or destroy the powers confided to the state governments." Jefferson, who noted that "Col. Taylor and myself have rarely, if ever, differed in any political principle of importance," considered Construction Construed and Constitutions Vindicated "the most logical retraction of our governments to the original and true principles of the Constitutio
 

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

已選取的頁面

內容

The principles of our constitutions
9
Construction
21
Sovereignty
25
The Union
39
Division and limitation of power
51
Property
67
The bank decisionCorporation
79
The bank decisionSovereignty of spheres
99
The bank decisionCommon defence and general welfare Necessary and proper Convenient National
161
The bank decisionPrecedents
191
Protecting duties and bounties
203
Assumption of judicial powers and patronage by legislatures
259
The laws of nations
279
The Missouri Questions
291
The distresses of the United States
315
版權所有

The bank decisionSupremacy
119

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

關於作者 (1998)

John Taylor, a journalist for more than two decades, has been a contributing editor at New York magazine and a senior writer for Esquire. He lives in East Moriches, New York.

書目資訊