An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

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Modern Library, 1909 - 976 頁
"An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (generally referred to by the short title The Wealth of Nations) is the masterpiece of the Scottish economist and moral philosopher Adam Smith. It was first published in 1776. It is an account of economics at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, as well as a rhetorical piece written for the generally educated individual of the 18th century - advocating a free market economy as more productive and more beneficial to society. The book is often considered to have laid the basic groundwork for modern economic theory" -- from Wikipedia.

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LibraryThing Review

用戶評語  - jimocracy - LibraryThing

Overall, this was an informative read; not for its economic insightfulness but for how its supporters use Smith's theories. There are some basic economic truths and a lot of tedious detail but what is ... 閱讀評論全文

LibraryThing Review

用戶評語  - JVioland - LibraryThing

One of the most influential books ever. I wish more neo-cons and ultra capitalist would read it. Smith espouses some government involvement in regulating business enterprises. No! Really! Why, that ... 閱讀評論全文

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第 336 頁 - I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good.
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第 428 頁 - Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production; and the interest of the producer ought to be attended to only so far as it may be necessary for promoting that of the consumer. The maxim is so perfectly self-evident that it would be absurd to attempt to prove it.
第 1 頁 - ... Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty-eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day. But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day...
第 119 頁 - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
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第 3 頁 - ... the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labour, and enable one man to do the work of many.
第 42 頁 - As soon as the land of any country has all become private property, the landlords, like all other men, love to reap where they never sowed, and demand a rent even for its natural produce.
第 116 頁 - The whole of the advantages and disadvantages of the different employments of labour and stock must, in the same neighbourhood, be either perfectly equal or continually tending to equality.
第 209 頁 - ... the interest of the public. The interest of the dealers, however, in any particular branch of trade or manufacture, is always in some respects different from, and even opposite to, that of the public. To widen the market and to narrow the competition, is always the interest of the dealers. To widen the market may frequently be agreeable enough to the interest of the public ; but to narrow the competition must always be against...

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