图书图片
PDF
ePub

COLUMN FOR THE LADIES.

SCIENTIFIC NOTICES.

1

MRS. HEMANS.

SOME writer has remarked, with equal force and beauty, STEAM ENGINES.-Steam engines were introduced about that; i* by'a visit to those places which we know to have 130 years ago, and continued upon the atmospheric conbeen the haunt of genius, we are more affected than when we hear of their actions, or read their works. And this struction for about fifty years. From the joint experiments remark is founded on a thorough knowledge of human of Messrs. Watt and Bolton, and the principle miners, the nature. The room where Newton was born at Wynford-best of those engines, in 1778, raised 2,000 gallons from a and the chamber in which Shakspeare saw the light on depth of 348 feet, for every bushel of coals used. An ordi. Aron-the churchyard where Gray wrote his Elegy-and the study where Johnson penned his immortal Rasselas nary man, working with a good pump, will raise- 1,000 must always possess a spell for those to whom learning and gallons from the same depth in a day. In 1829, the best genius are dear. And such was the feeling with which I engine in Cornwall did ten times the work of those in 1778, gazed on the cottage of the poetess at Rhyader. The situa or each bushel of coals raised 20,006 gallons of water. In tion is pretty and picturesque. The view, at once rich in 1829, therefore, one bushel of coals did the wages of twenty the foreground, and romantic in the distance, is precisely men, or of four horses for one whole day. The rearing of that on which a mind, so exquisitely alive to the charms of men, or of horses, bears as great a proportion to the whole nature, would delight to repose. Of the interior, I will of their labour, as the cost of steam engines does to that only say (for the home of such a woman is hallowed ground which they can do; therefore, a bushel of coals, by the and its secrets should not be delivered over to the vulgar steam engine, buys as much labour as the wages of twenty gaze of the public eye) that it is plentifully adorned with men, or the keep of four horses. A bushel of coals (which that best furniture books; and is rich in those little em is about three quarters of a hundred weight, at 20s. a ton) bellishments which a woman's ingenuity can so readily costs 9d., in the coal districts; in the places where the price supply, and a woman's taste can best arrange. By a com is highest, it will not cost more than 1s. 9d., and the cost of monplace observer Mrs. Hemans would be considered an coal, for 1 he whole engines, may be, therefore, taken at the interesting, rather than a beautiful woman. And yet hers average of 1s. 3d., while the men, at ls. 3d. a day would cost is beauty of the highest class. It depends neither on feature 24s. Men, therefore, could not compete with steam engines if nor complexion. It is that which lasts the longest, and their wages exceeded 4d. in the week, or three farthings for over which time has so little power—the beauty of the each day's hard work of ten hours. If they worked at a soul. The intellect which lights up that pale and placid rate like this, they would be worse off than were the Indians countenance, bestows on it a life and loveliness, a grandeur of South America. If the men did work as cheaply as the and a majesty, to which no complexion, however brilliant, engines, the coals would not be consumed as extensively as no features, however faultless, can aspire. The expression inachinery enables them to be consumed. The consumpof the countenance, when in repose, is deeply melancholy. tion of coals has increased much more rapidly than the in. That dark, soft, sad eye, tells a tale of past sorrow and suf crease of the population. In the time of Charles the Il. fering. But the expression about the mouth, when speak- 200,000 chaldrons were annually consumed in London. At ing, is frank, and singularly winning; and in conversation

the present time, above a million and a half chaldrons are on any favourite topic, her eye lights up with living lustre. consumed. It has been calculated that each person in Lon. At these moments, she bears no faint resemblance to Pasta. don, in 1801, used a chaldron of coals in a year, and that - Whychotte of St. John's.

pow a chaldron and one-sixth is used by each person. The CAROLINE.

competition of capital and improved machinery have made

coals cheaper.
AUBURN are the locks thou bearest,
Gentle Caroline;

HYDRO-OXYGEN MICROSCOPE.The great defect in the
Golden are the locks thou wearest,

Solar Microscope is, that its effectiveness depends, wbolly Fawn-like Caroline;

upon the unclouded presence of the sun. Its operations, And thy voice is as a lute,

the result of refraction, are suspended whenever it is deTouch'd by a gentle maiden ;

prived of the full potency of the solar beams. In our cli. And thy cheek is like ripe fruit,

mate, therefore, but especially in winter, it can be resorted Sweet, and blossom-laden ;

to but seldom, and never with perfect satisfaction. To Gentle Caroline !

obviate this inconvenience, the aid of oxygen and hydrogen Wherefore are thy lips so red,

gas has been resorted to, and their united stream being di. Sylph-like Caroline ?

rected against a piece of lime, produces a light of such vivid And thy locks flow down thy head

force as effectually answers all the purposes of strong illuLike the twisted vine?

mination. We need not refer to the wonderful magnifying If love be not within thy heart,

power of the solar microscope. Most of our readers must Earth is not meant for thee;

ere this be familiar with it. Suffice it to say that it can in And I not made for earth if thou,

truth represent objects five hundred thousand times larger Sweetest, love not me,

in size than they really are. Thus the pores of the slen. Sylph-like Caroline !

derest twig, and the fibres of the most delicate leaf, expand CHRISTIAN NAMES OF WOMEN.

into coarse net-work. The external integuments of a fly's

eyes, filled with thousands of lenses, appear in the dimenIv Christian world Mary the garland wears!

sions of a lady's veil—that gentleman yclept the flea swells Rebecca sweetens on a Hebrew's ear;

into six feet-worms seem like boa coustrictors, while the Quakers for pure Priscilla are more clear;

population of a drop of goodly ditch water present such And the light Gaul by amorous Ninon swears.

shapes as Teniers should have seen before he pencilled the Among the lesser lights how Lucy shives !

grotesque monsters who troubled the solitude of St. Antho. What air of fragrance Rosamond throws round !

ny. The hydro-oxygen microscope, we need scarcely, reHow like a 'hymn doth sweet Cecilia sound !

mark promises to do much more for mankind than to graOf Marthas and of Abigails, few lines

tify his curiosity. It will prove an important assistant in Have braggʻd in verse. Of coarsest household stuff

the investigation of physical science. Should homely Joan be fashioned. But can

SYMPATHY OF MOTION...It has been found, that in a You Barbara resist, or Marian!

watchmaker's shop, the time-pieces or clocks, connected with And is not Clare for love excuse enough?

the same wall or shelf, have such sympathetic effect in keepYet, by my faith in numbers, I profess, i

ing time, that they stop those which beat in irregular time; These all, than Saxon Edith, please me less.

and if any are at rest, set agoing those which beat accurateAthendur.

C. LAMB. ly. Gardiner's Music of Nature.

TO EDITH $

Came for my other their breakfastcally as

SCRAPS.

The Sabbath bells, with a holy ale

Were ringing o'er woodland heath and
EDUCATION IN IRELAND,

was a season whose living influeen
In favour of mere learning the poor Catholics of Ireland Throngh air, through earth, and the heals
have made prodigions exertions, such as would not pass for

No feeble joy was that peasant's lot, credible, were not the facts attested by those who were ut

As his children gambolled before his cot, willing witnesses. By data furnished in 1827, we have in round numbera, the following :-*

SCHOLARS IN IRELAND.

Paid for their
Schooling Free.

Came forth, and
Protestants, 90,000. ....56,000.....44,000

gone ; Catholics, 400,000....320,000......80,000

'Twas a beautiful sight, as meekly still It is hence obvious, that about half the Protestant children. They sat in their joy on the cottage sill. are free, while not above one-fifth of the Catholics are so. And is this the man, thou vaunting knave, Here, however, is the willingness proved, notwithstanding Thou hast dared to compare with the weeping slave? their well-known comparative weakness in means, which Away! find one slave in the world to copes should have ensured them fairness, if not indulgence, in the

With him in his heart, his home, and his bopt distribution of the public funds for education. A Cry to He is not in thy lands of sin and pain, Ireland.

Scared with the lash, and cramped with the chain ; BARBARITY OF BIRD CATCHING.–The summer bird In thy burning clime, where the heart is cold cal catchers are the most barbarous, who entrap only singing And man, like the beast, is bought and sola.

aus birds, and take them without regard to their having young, He is not in the East in his gorgeous halsed which may perish by their absence, or to that harsh change

Where the servile crowd before him falls, from the enjoyment of summer sunshine and pleasures, to

Till the bow'string comes in an hour of wrath, the captivity of a cage. When I see their nests spread in the field, I wish them all manner of villanous ill luck,

And he vanishes from the tyrant's path. Insatser and I never omit a favourable opportunity of deranging or But oh! thou slanderer false and vile, destroying lime twigs when they fall in my way ; none of

Dare but to cross that garden stile, our customs mark our selfishness more then keeping singing

Dare but to touch that lowly thatch, birds in perpetual confinement, making the pleasure of our Dare but to force that peasant's lateh;" * cars their misfortune, and that sweet gift which God has

And thy craven soul shall wildly quake, given them, wherewith to make themselves happy, and the

And the thunder peal that deed shall wake, a country delightful, the curse of their lives. This practice

And myriad tongues of fire shall sound, 5. is detestable, doubly so, in the capture of migratory birds,

As if every stone cried from the ground. who have not merely the common love of liberty, but the instinct of migration to struggle with, and it may be safely

The indignant thrill like flanie shall spread, asserted, that out of every ten nightingales so caught, nine

Till the isle itself rock 'neath thy tread, pine away and die.

And a voice from the people, peer, i nd throne A SYNONYMY.–At the Liverpool Quarter Sessions, the

Ring in thine ears, “ Atone ! atone! other day, an action of trover was brought for the recovery

For Freedom here is common guest, of a cart of very little value, the delivery of which to the In princely hall, in peasant's rest; plaintiff, as the alleged purchaser, had been refused by the The palace is filled with her living tight, u! DAN defendant; and it was quite certain that the trial of the And she watches the hamlet day and night.ses gros question would cost many times the worth of the article,

» Then the land for me! the land for me !lens se In the course of the proceedings the following dialogue oca cured :-Counsel Then you went and demanded the cart

Where every living soul is frees,e 1 from the defendant?. Witness - Na, indeed. He said the

Where winter may come, where storms may rateca.

But the tyrant dare not bring his slave. plaintiff might go to hell for it, or he might go to the devil

31 28d2bar=1 for it ; I don't exactly recollect which of the words

might

TO CORRESPONDENTS. “ go to law for it," I supposed-(Loud laughter:) Maccles."

In answer to several applications, we beg to mention that some of field Courier.

firth 63 949 urínko a dokter early numbers of the Political Registrare out of pribt, and oftes

we cannot turnish them without incurring a heavy expenses Rates THE ENGLISH PEASANT.

29' ! Vefas gister is not stereotyped like the Schoolmaster, but we keep each thing" 19,ber in types for a month, to accommodate such of our weekly subscribe

as wish to procure it, te bind up with the Schouimaster. . The condition of the West Indian slave is much better and happier

CONTENTS OF yo. XXXVII. than that of the English peasantry."- Common Assertion.

Lotteries,......

Ferdusi, the Persian Poet,.. vid.... THE land for me! the land for me!

Lady Grange, Where every living soul is free;

That we should rise with the Lark,.... Where winter may come, where storms may rave,

Fruit of Church of England Establishments, But the tyrant dare not bring his slave.

Peep at the Agitator and his Master, ..... I should hate to dwell in a summer land,

Washington and Major Andre,.............

THE STORY-TELLER-The Pasicka; or, Bee Farm, Where flowers spring up on every hand,

COLUMN FOR THE LADIES Mrs. Hemans-Caroline Where the breeze is glad, the heavens are fair, t'And the taint of blood is everywhere.

tian names of Women,.....

SCIENTIFIC NOTICES-Steam EnginesHydra.Oxygen I saw a peasant sit at his door,

croscope, - ..*.*....********** When his weekly toil in the fields was o'er ;

SCRAPS, ............ He sat on the bench his grandsire made,

The English Peasant,.......... He sat in his father's wahut shade de 'Twas the golifen hour ofan April'mořn,

EDINBURGH: Printed by and for JORN JONNETOXI, 19, St James Lightly the lark spruug from the corn,

Square - Published by JOEN ANDERSON, Jun., Bookseller, 88, North The blossoming trees shone purely white,

Bridge Street, Edinburgh ; by JoUN MACLEOD, and ATKINSONS CON

Booksellers, Glasgow, and sold by all Booksellers and Vedas And the young leayes quivered in the light.

Cheat. Periodicals

IA PA

[ocr errors]

BY WILLIAM HOWITT.

EDINBURGE WEEKLY MAGAZINE,

CONDUCTED BY JOHN JOHNSTONE.

THE SCHOOLMASTER IS ABROAD. LORD BROUGHAM.

[ocr errors]

No. 38. -VOL. II. SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 1833. Price THREE-HALFPENCE.
HINTS FOR CONVERSATION. bably receive an account of every person of your ac-

quaintance who may have had the same disorder,
In this paper I shall give hints for subjects of con- by which means you may excite and bestow sym-
versation, and directions as to the manner of treat-pathy, which, according to Dr. Adam Smith, is one
ing them. The first and most obvious topic is the of the most amiable feelings of the human mind.
weather, and a strict investigation of the state of As the sublime, however, shows a greater degree of
the atmosphere. For this purpose I would advise genius than the tender, and as terror, according
every gentleman to keep a barometer in his room, to Blair and to Burke, is a requisite in the sublime,
and a thermometer to a northern exposure, that he I would advise, especially if ladies be present,
may be able with accuracy to determine the exact that a Radical Rebellion in Ireland, if possible,
state of the air ; this will shew his attention to a be introduced, and often recurred to ; thus as the
subject of such great importance, and general use penetrating Faber,
in conversation. The advantages arising from this

« One of these learned philologists, who trace topic are incalculable ; it furnishes a gentleman

A panting syllable, through time and space,

Start it at home, and hunt it in the dark, with an opportunity of 'displaying his discernment,

To Gaul, to Greece, and into Noah's ark," and giving a great deal of useful information, such

CowPER, as, when a great-coat ought to be worn, or an ad-presses every word into his service that has one ditional pair of stockings put on ; when a store of letter of similitude; I would advise every obserliquorice or sugar-candy ought to be provided; or vation whatever to be maile, to bear upon this if it might be proper to take a glass of tody be subject. Is it remarked that the weather is boisfore going to bed when a dram should be taken terous ? “ It would be a bad day to flee if the to keep one warm, or a little spirits and water to Radicals were rising." Is it foggy ? “ The Ra. keep one cool. This subject ought always to be dicals will have fine opportunity for drilling in this treated with great gravity, and a few epithets oc-weather.” Is the dinner ill cooked ? « We'll casionally bestowed upon the day. It may be ob- perhaps be glad of such as this when the Radicals served, that it is devilish hot, or d-'d cold; this come. The other excellencies of this subject gives it an elegant turn, and relieves it from being are, that it changes every day, and gives scope entirely a dry disquisition. From the weather, to the imagination, and possesses that obscurity the transition is easy and natural to the state of which is also necessary in the sublime. The Yeothe health, which ought never to be neglected, espe- manry necessarily follow; if any be present, the cially if the person we meet happens to be look-conversation of course turns upon uniforms and ing ill; he should be particularly informed of military evolutions ; the language upon this topic this circumstance, and warmly reminded to take ought to be as technical as possible, intermingled more care of himself ; this shows our friendship with frequent apostrophes to the devil in favour for him. He should be minutely questioned about of O'Connell and Cobbett; the reviews, drills, the nature of his distemper; and should he answer, &c. &c. will easily furnish one half-hour's converas some people have a trick of, that he is very sation. The pikemen may be here introduced well, insist upon it that he is not, and that you with advantage, and a dissertation upon the Macenever saw him looking worse; this will probably donian phalanx thrust in with great effect. Dinner lead him to give a full account of the matter, and furnishes a noble subject, as it affords to all preafford you an opportunity of giving him a cure. sent an excellent opportunity of descanting upon I have known a gentleman get twenty infallible cookery, which I have often heard done much to cures for a cold in a morning, by the attention of my edification, for whole hours together, and his friends in this respect. Should you be ques. thereby have been saved the necessity of studying tioned about your health, give a full account of all the excellent publication of Mistress Margaret the troubles you may have had for a fortnight or a Dods, upon that subject, which however I would month past at least, how you got them, and how earnestly recommend to every gentleman's perusal you got rid of them ; this is highly entertaining, who would wish to take a part in this most indisand may be of much use; in return you will pro- pensable subject. Having at learned length di

cussed those topics which I have merely suggested, tricks they have played. It is a pity that such a Character should immediately be brought upon the fund of instruction and amusement should be kept carpet; though this be a prerogative of the tea entirely between husband and wife. There is only table, yet it is not peculiarly so, and may be ele- one hint more, which I shall presume to give the gantly introduced in the form of an anecdote, and fair sex, and that is, that upon no occasion should come in like a tart at the close of the dinner. As they allow the smallest quarter to the frail sister. de mortuis nil nisi bonum is a justly exploded hood. Men consider this as the most unequivocal maxim, so a similar line of conduct ought to be mark of virtue, and when they see ladies outrageheld with regard to the absent : of what use are ously chaste, never infer that disgust is the conthe failings of friends, if not to afford instruction ? sequence of disappointment. When virgins ad. For which cause these should always be particu- vance in years, they should be careful to enumelarly pointed out, and this is always attended with rate, as frequently as possible, the conquests they the greatest advantage when the person is absent, have made, and the lovers they have slighted in because greater freedom is used, and consequently their youth : this gives them a degree of respecmore instruetion obtained ; and the larger the tability. Should any scholastic Bore unhappily is. company in which this is done the better, as it troduce a literary subject, his mouth should be instands a greater chance of being more beneficial. mediately closed with the merits of a fur tippet :

So much with regard to topics in which both should he persist, ask him whether the military cap sexes are concerned; but it would be unpardonable or velvet bonnet is most likely to prevail during the not to offer a few hints for the particular improve- winter; and depend upon it, he will not get in another ment of the fair sex. I would recommend to word during the evening. I shall now proceed to them dress, the fashions, the characters, politeness, the ornamental parts of speech, which I would reand prices of all the haberdashers about town; commend to the particular notice of those who particular details, how Mrs. becomes her wish to make themselves agreeable. Expletites, pelisse, and how Miss looks in her Indian if well introduced, are among the greatest beauties shawl, and how Mr.

wears his

Here of conversational eloquence. Those most generthe making of matches should commence, and ally in repute are apostrophes and imprecations ; every couple that are at all acquainted should be and they are sanctioned by the most genteel s. paired with due expedition. I have heard of mar- cieties and classical authorities. Bless me! Derul riages actually taking rise from this laudable prac- take him! Good heavens! and Good gracions tice. The married ladies should enlarge upon the are a few of the elementary and most simple ones; advantages of matrimony, and particularize dis- but a little observation will easily enable the learatinctly all the peculiarities of their husbands; er to excel these, and a little practice to throw upon which side he likes to lie in the night-time, and them in with a good grace. The above are merewhether he snores; when he rises in the morning, ly a few, which ladies, and those who possess : and how long he takes to dress; how many clothes degree of bashfulness (which is ever an enemy to he dirties during the week ; what seat he usually excellence) usually employ ; I have known a whole sits on, and how he likes his dinner cooked ; what sentence of expletives introduced at a time, which dishes he is fond of, and how thick his shoes are adds astonishingly to the beauty of conversation in the soles. After husbands, then the servants To quote these is needless, as they may be hear

! should come in ; how difficult it is to find a good in any number, in walking along Prince's Streft one, and how many you have had since you were or the Bridges. Demosthenes and Cicero used married. The faults of servants is a fine topic; imprecations at great length ; and hence the soI have known it serve for a whole evening's enter- periority of their eloquence over all modern altainment; more especially, how much they are tempts in this way.

There is another beauty given to rastery; how many candle-ends have which has been too much considered as the pecubeen found in the dresser drawer, and how much liar property of travellers, and which has gie? butter thrown among the ashes, and what a their conversation immense advantage over tha? quantity of coals are made use of in the year; of such as never roamed from home; I mean always concluding with such a sentence as the free use of the metaphor. I am afraid the public following, that “ servants are enough to ruin any cannot show cause why this privilege should be body;" or, i servants are a perfect pest;" or, that be extended; for my own part, I consider nothita they require to be strictly looked after ; which so, “ stale, fat, and unprofitable," as a mere des serves like a truism at the tail of a sermon, by tail of facts ; this gives no opportunity for dis way of a practical improvement of the subject. As playing genius; it shows no ingenuity; the first dawnings of intellect are extremely in- rectness is the strongest proof a person can give teresting to the philosophic mind, and as Locke, of mediocrity. Genius carries the rapt astonished in his essay, seems to have felt the want of facts hearer beyond the feeble bounds of probability upon this subject, I would merely hint to mothers, and if this can be done in the common intercourse that they should be as full as possible in their de- of life, so much the more ingenuity is displayed tails of the first prattlings of their infants ; what In reciting conversation, therefore, a person should word they first uttered, what curious questions consider not merely what has been said, but what they ask, especially when they begin to get their might have been said; this was the plan pursued catechism ; how drol they are, and what funny I by Thucydides and Livy, and has given

their bis

tories so much celebrity; and I see no reason why 1 and the neck-pin in your Dicky. By stretching people may not speak as well as write in the name your leg and complaining of rheumatism, an opof others. In all these little recitals, a person portunity will be had of exhibiting the elegance should introduce himself as frequently as possible. of the net-work in the ancle of your silk hose. One is so apt to be overlooked in a large company,

After these have been exhibited, you may look at that this is absolutely necessary if he wishes for your watch; by this means your Cairngorum seal distinction, Great acquaintances, such as my will likely have its share of compliment. But friend Lord or my brother the Major, are there is one most important circumstance to be also great ornaments in a story. Learned words, attended to all the while, and this is the change too, are a vast embellishment; tall handsome words of the voice ; it would be highly rude and brutish in a sentence, like grenadiers in a regiment, give to address a delicate lady in the same rough comit a fine appearance; it is of little consequence mon accents which are used in speaking to a he. how they are introduced, if there. Punning is an creature; no ; you must simper and lisp, and bring astonishing beauty; the more distant the allusion, your voice as near as possible to the delicate key the more interesting ; I would not give a straw of the lady's tones. for a pun which any body might understand. This The above are only a few of the many hints beauty has one recommendation, i. e. it is easily which might be suggested ; nothing but an imperiattainable. The inuendo is a species of the above, ous sense of the duty I owe to the public could have and possesses the qualification of giving ladies an forced me thus to venture upon this important excuse for blushing, and gentlemen an opportunity topic; my hints indeed are but crude, while the of observing that the blush is not entirely an or. subject is capable of the most fertile and varied nament of the old school, which they might other illustration. wise be apt to imagine. As agitation prevents the

But great perfections are like heaven, vast mass of fluids which surround this globe from

Too rich a present to be given ;

Nor are such master-strokes of beauty, stagnation and putrefaction, so a little contradic

To be performi'd without hard duty. tion prevents conversation from suffering a similar fate; and if a gentleman can get out of temper

SOCIETY IN NORTH AMERICA. easily, it adds greatly to the entertainment. A (From a Moral and Political Sketch of the United States stamp with the foot, or a knock on the table,

of North America, by Achille Murat. ) though it does not make so deep an impression as

IF, in the United States, the government is established

upon a principle altogether new and unknown, at least in a rhetorical flourish on the countenance of your its application—that of the sovereignty of the people, in the opponent, yet frequently produces an admirable strictest sense of the word,—so also society and the relations effect. Indeed gesticulation is, as Dr. Blair has of individuals towards each other are based on a footing not well expressed it, natural eloquence. I am sorry Mr. less new; namely, competition. There is no sort of aristoThelwall has not favoured the public with his elo: cracy of birth ; fortune gives no rights but to the physical

advantages it may purchase ; but talent and merit see no quent and erudite lectures upon ORGANIC ACTION, as bounds to their reasonable ambition. Every body in our these would have enabled me to be more full upon republican system is rigorously classed according to his ca. this part of the subject ; and I shall merely sug- pacity. You are about to conclude we are St. Simonians ; gest a few attitudes, as the last beauty of conver-T, a white man and free, am going to submit my reason to

-no, my friend, do not mistake me. Can you suppose that sation, which may in part make up the loss that of any of my equals? Do you think that I will go and to the public. In recitation, if you are near the ask some buffoon to class me, when I am sure of conquering person you address, the most elegant attitude cer- by myself that station, whatever it may be, to which I am tainly is, to stare in his face ; though sometimes entitled in the scale of beings? Do you think that I will it is graceful to turn away your head, and speak to whom he may delegate his functions ? I, who am de

go and acknowledge the Pere Infantin, or any other quack to the door or the fire-place; catching hold at the pendent on nobody, and free as the air I breathe ? Quite same time of his button-hole ; if not, the arms the reverse : the St. Simonian system and the American should be placed akimbo, and, to prevent uniformi- system are the two extremes of the diameter of human ty, the neckcloth may be occasionally tucked

thought. The one is based upon an absolute subjection, a

up In declamation, a slap upon the forehead, a twiti slavery much stronger than has ever existed, since it extends

even to the mind, and if we are to believe certain reports, with a stick, the arms extended, a pocket handker- perhaps slanderous, even over the most sacred affections; chief, are all requisities, and may be applied ac the other, on the contrary, is founded on the principle of the cording to the nature of the subject. The ladies most absolute liberty : independence is its result. The one can lift up both hands very prettily, ay, and both force me to be happy, in its own way, even against my will;

will protect me against all dangers, real or imaginary, and eyes too.

the other launches me, young and hardy, upon the waves If you speak to an inferior never deign to look of life, to sport as I please, extricate myself from dificulties at him; it is low, and he is a fool if he expects as I can, and be happy or perish in my own way; for it is it: always in this case, throw your eyes, your in that of another. Competition, that is the secret of the

very certain that without losing my identity I cannot be so head, and even your whole body, in a different American system ; every thing is to be won by competition : direction; turning round on the heel, presenting fortune, power, love, riches, all these objects of desire are your back, and speaking like Hotspur, " indiffer- attainable ; it is for the most skilful to go in pursuit of ently,” are to be recommended. In talking to the them. Just as in the old fairy tales, those enchanted prinladies, be sure you put yourself in such an attitude as still more, by rivals who crowd the same path, and who will may best show the elegant symmetry of your limbs, not be sparing of a kick to assist you in tumbling down. the fitness of your dress, the ring on your finger Fortunately, however, in our land of plenty, the princesses

« 上一页继续 »