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ib.

278
255

49, 65

PAGE

Viger, trade with the countries on the,

102
Nonconformity, origin of English,

397

Normandy,

Norsemen, tradition of the,

14

Notes Of Tue MONTH-January,

February,

SI

March,

145

No*es on the Island of Tahiti, and on the Sandwich Islands, &c. 309

Vot yet fitteen,

151

Official Costumes-State Mummery

129
Old Scottish Town, an,

45
Orchards in Scotland,

336
Oxalis crenata,
an improvement on the Potato,

87

Paper, a prodigy in,

22

Parliament, Members of,

196

Parliamentary Candidates, riches of, &c.

195

Peas,

207

Peep at the Agitator and his Master,

232

?'hilosophy, wonders of,

31

l'hrenoiogy, history of the discovery of, by Dr. Gall,

150

272

POETRY.

Frost,

Verses for the Young-A Son to his Mother,

5

The death of the Old Year,

8

Churches for the Rich,

Random Records of returns to Parliament:

23

'I he Friendless One,

30

To the Pole Star, by Mrs. Johnstone,

Affectation,

40

The Wine Tree,

My Father's Home,

63

To a sleeping Child,

64

To My Books,

ib.

Cupid and Minerva,

Saturday Evening,

A Maxim overturned,

ib.

Woman,

88

The Winter guest,

96

To a Red-breast,

100

Farewell-by Bishop Heber,

101

A Lesson for an Inta nt School,

ib.

11scription on a Boy's torrb-stone in an Irish country

churchyard,

116

Cltima Domus-impromptu,

128

Verrily danced the Quaker,

fiome,

150

Hebridean Poetry,

151

The Slaves' address to British Females,

152

Conjugal discipline,

159

To the Little Lady-the votary of High Men, 160

. righteous Man regardeth the life of his beast, ib.

To a Highland innkeeper,

ib.

Drinking Song of the Men of Basle,

176

Slavery-a Night scene in Africa,

183

Tiymn of the confederate Poles of Lubionski,

18+

The Ministrel,

192

"The Highland'Homes of Scotland,

198

To Rosalie,

206

Lithuanian chant,

23

Caroline,

238

The English Peasant,

240

On a Mother's tombstorie, in the burial ground of St.

Louis, Paris,

217

The Daisy,

ib.

Mazurek,

252

Hyunn for the Sons of the Clergy,

26+

The Minstrel's Song,

268

The True Poet,

279

Niay,

287

A Duet,

296

Ireland,

312

The Blind Beggar of Bagnolet,

319

Epicedium, written on the death of a Sister,

327

À Mother's address to her dying Infant,

332

Slumber-From the Spanish,

360

Black Eyes and blue,

ib.

St. Basil to a fallen Virgin,

ib.

Farewell,

367

The German Student's drinking Song,

383

The Polish Eagle,

38+

The true Balm,

391

Verses to a lonely Loch in the Highlands,

400

Praise of Women,

408

Pongos, the,

106
Post Office Tax, the,

318
Potatoes, introduction of, into Ireland,
Potato, uses of the-Salubrity,

87
Poverty, an effect of,
Precautions to be used during a thunder Storm,
Press and the Theatres, the,

86

Press in the East, the,

8

Priestley, Dr.,

279
Priestley's (Dr.) Centenary,

238
i'riestley's Dr.) opinion of high life,

366

Progress of Arts and Inventions-Inumph of Steam-Brickmaking

by Steam,

341

Public carriages,
Rapids, the, an American Story,

58
Rattle Snake, curious experiment on a,

325

Religious camp meeting in America,

23

Remarkable account of a Battle between two Snakes,

318
Remarkable history (f:ophia Dorothea, wife of George I.
Remarkable Story of an Avalanche,

116
Robbers of Tantallon, the

216
Rural population, the,
Salmon,
Samphire Gatherer, the,

151
Sapping and mining,
Surgical Operation, extraordinary,

406

Savings Banks,
Scientific Notices,

239, 272, 250, 335, 368
Scotsmen, partiality for,

254

Scrap', original and selected, 16, 32, 43, 64, 66, 112, 128, 176, 192,

208, 2:4, 240, 256, 289, 301, 320, 336, 352, 308, 394, 100, 416

Servants,

132

Servants, rules for,

120

Shell Fish,

215
Sierra Leone and its capital Freetown,

181
Silk factory, visit to a,
Silk, imperishable nature of,

317
Silk manufacture, the,

819
Sinbad the Sailor,

104
Singular circumstance,

71
Singular Story, a,
Sir Caher O'Doherty,

271
Sir Humphrey Davy's correspondence,

271
Sir Walter Farquhar-Ghost stories,
Slavery, demoralization of, and its effects,
Slavery, divine retribution for the sin of,"

199
Slavery, extract of an Address of the Quakers to their Christian
brethren,

197
Slavery necessarily a system of cruelty,

294

Slavery Report,

Slovenliness, effects of,

87

Smuggler's tale, a,

197

Soldiers,

366

Somnolency, an interesting case of,

Spartan brevity of Speech, a more than,

State of feeling in a manufacturing Town, on the,

35

State of the Working Classes-Dr. Chalmers's pamphlet,

52

Statistics- European population,

Steam Engine, improved,

207

Steam, march of,

56

Stewart's Three Years in North America, Mr.,

STORY-TELLER, THE

Scottish Manners The farmer's Ha’ in a December

Night,-By Mrs. Johnstone,

The Rose in January-a German Tale,

The Irish Bessy Bell and Mary Gray,

We'll see about it,

57

Tubber Derg; or the Red Well,

Do. Continued,

First Going to Church-a Tale for the Young, 105

The Haunted House-By Allan Cunningham,

121

My Place in the Country,

137

Do. Continued,

153

The Young Widow of Bremen,
The Hare Hound and the Witch,

185
Do. Continued,

201

A Parisian Gossiping,

217

The Pasieka; or the Bee-Farm,

283

Do, Continued,

249

The King of the Peak-a Derbyshire Tale,

George Mason-Life in the new Settlements of Ame.

rica,

281

Do. Continued,

297

What Everybody says must be true-á Tale,

313

The seven Daughters of the Rector of Epworth, 329

Consumption,

315

A '1 ale of Ninety-Eight,

361

A Passage in the life of 'sir H. Dc Gre;, by Mrs S. C.

Hall,

The ten Years of Silvio Pellico,

393

Duncan and his Dog,

409

Sunday Amusements,

328

Sunday in London,

319

Sunday Schools in Glasgow,

Superstition, singular,

Sword Dance, the,

Tailor and the Middies, the,

Talleyrand,

255

Temperance Societies,

97

That we should rise with the Lark,

231

Three Arguments in favour of a repeal of the taxes on Knowledge,

by Lord Brougham,

264

Tigre Ter,

351

Tithes,

183

Tithes-Dr. Chalmers,

104

Travelling, modern,

78

Trimmings and trappings of a modern Successor of the Apostles, 119

Troubadours,

95

Trout in Loch Awe,

117

Turkish Ladies,

324

Tyrolese Peasant, house hold of the,

395

Ugliness,

198

United States, population of,

120

Unitarianism in England,

271

Useful hint,

205

Useful hints, and receipts for warm weather,

376

Useful knowledge-Summer and Winter clothing, &c.

214

USEFUL Notices-Gardening, &c.

248

Improvement of heath land and cultivation of

Potatoes-Simple and useful Invention, 400

Usurer, life of an,

ISS

Ventriloquism,

394

Volcanoes, theory of,

155

Wages in England in the lath century,

21

Walham Wag, the,

War, abhorrence ot,

103

Washington and Major Andre,

West India Colonies,

84

What's in a name?

367

William and Nancy,

125

Willow Trees, the, a Sketch,

Wiuter Sketch, a,-the Carpenter's Daughter-Frost,

Wisdom of our Ancestors, the,

Women,

218

Yellow Domino, the,

118

Young Nick and the Bosun,

SOS

366
376

138

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NOTICE TO THE NEW EDITION OF THE the failure of the late generous attempt made by
SCHOOLMASTER.

Mr. BULWER, leads me to despair of it ever being

effected till the measure is wrung from the legislaThis little Periodical, the object of which is explained be- ture by the increase of the unstamped periodicals. low, has now been in course publication for above two I have long had the present Miscellany in contem. months. Without puffing, fudgifying, or effort of any plation, and have spoken of it from time to time; kind, it has been received throughout Scotland as a wel. but as a periodical of this kind can never be of come, well-timed, cheap publication. Throngh friendly ad- equal value with a newspaper, nor at all supply its

place, I still hoped that a change in the law would vice, and repeated invitation, the SchOOL MASTER is now

permit those alterations, and that reduction in induced to make his appearance across the Border. Though price, which is all that is wanted to make newshis lucubrations are printed in Edinburgh, it will be seen papers sweep away all other kinds of cheap publicathat his objects are as extensive as British society, or as hu- tions. To the month of April of the present year I manity itself. For their encouragement and furtherance, we looked forward as the era of reduced prices and imventure to solicit the kindness of all liberal and intelligent proved form; and on the 14th January I noticed this

expectation in the Edinburgh Weekly Chronicle. Mr. Englishmen and Irishmen; and it is confidently hoped BULWER's recent defeat, however, settles a question that the favour and protection of his own countrymen, which, I fear, the state of the revenue--if that be the abroad as at home, will not be withheld from the SCHOOL- only real obstacle—will for a long time prevent beSLASTER while he shall continue to deserve their counten ing agitated with any hope of a successful terminaance. For his honesty of purpose and earnest endeavour, almost under the sanction of Ministers, indicates

tion. The appearance of the Penny Magazine, we can undertake, and that thus far at least he will not the course to be pursued with the newspapers, and disgrace their kindness.

also the sort of reading which even a liberal go. ST. JAMES'S SQUARE,

vernment approves for the people. It is evidently OCTOBER 12, 1832.

thought better that they should read of the growth '' This work is published in Weekly Numbers, price of the tea -plant, than watch the progress of legisThree-Halfpence; and in Monthly Parts, stitched in a neat lation, or inquire into rights of industry; and learn wrapper, with JOHNSTONE'S MONTHLY REGISTER of the ostrich and the giraffe, than jealously scruOF PUBLIC EVENTS AND SCOTTISH LISTS, price tinize the conduct of their rulers. Both kinds of Serenpence when consisting of four numbers, and Nine- reading are good ; but the knowledge which teaches pence when consisting of five numbers, with an enlarged men how they may increase the comforts of their Register. For the convenience of those who take the home and hearth is immeasurably the most im · Weekly Numbers, the Register and Cover may be had se- portant. It is, therefore, the avowed purpose of parately, price One Penny.

this publication to be political, in so far as the

science of politics is connected with social wellADDRESS.

being :-in short, to be as political as the existing

laws permit, and to approach, as closely as is pos Tais little periodical publication owes its exist- sible, to the character of what I conceive a really ence to the non-removal of the Taxes on Knowledge. useful newspaper. We must not tell what passes In January, 1831, 1, in common with every one in Parliament, nor at public meetings; but, if reconnected with the newspaper press, exulted in stricted in details, the fundamental principles of the prospect of an immediate and large reduction all good government are surely open to discussion ; of the duty on newspapers

as 'among the first and the complicated phenomena of social life prefruits of a liberal Administration. This hope, de- sent endless subjects for speculation and popular layed for a time to be renewed in the present year, disquisition. What must not be attempted by a has been at length completely frustrated ; and relation of facts, may be accomplished by illustra

tions ; and we have high authority for shadowing diately popular than pitching our tone in a lower forth in parable that which a Pharisascal jealousy key, we shall still deem it more wise, as well as more of the freedom of discussion does not permit to respectful, to endeavour to raise all our audience to

ppear in the direct form of naked truth. As an the level, which, for a great part of it, may still be exemplification of the principle, I refer to the found too humble. The price at which THE Tale, and the Observations given in the present SCHOOLMASTER is sold is so low as only to be week on a subject which at present occupies much afforded on the expectation of considerable sales. of the public attention-Military Flogging. THE | It is such as could . scarcely be lessened by any SCHOOLMASTER, therefore, besides being as reduction of taxation, and only by improvements political as the laws allow, will embrace as wide a in the manual operations of printing which are range of intelligence, scientific and literary, as is not at present anticipated. It has not been unpermitted to the Weekly Reviews and Literary dertaken without due consideration, nor without Journals. It will require a few more statutes to securing the means, by the assistance of pracdefine the exact limits which the unstamped publi- tised writers, to make it worthy of the patronage cations may not trespass; and it may soon be found which is solicited for it. It is for time and chance wiser to abrogate a pernicious law, which there is to determine the degree in which it may deserve

uch strong temptation to evade, than by farther encouragement. Though late in the field, the pains and penalties to struggle to maintain what boundaries are every day extending :—there is is unworthy of longer protection.

room for all. Such being the origin and purpose of THE With this explanation of motives and purposes, SCHOOLMASTER, I have now briefly to de- and without farther preface or profession, I leave tail its exact plan. The main object will be the this undertaking to speak henceforth for itself. cheap and universal diffusion of really useful in- All that can be claimed for it, or that ought to be formation of every kind of such snatches and desired, is a fair field and no favour,--with a trial foretastes of all kinds of knowledge, as may sti- deliberate enough to enable the judges to make a mulate to more extended inquiries, and supply sound and true deliverance. ELEMENTS OF THought in all departments of mind.

JOHN JOHNSTONE, Mechanical Inventions, and the progress of discovery in the physical sciences, but above all in what

CHEAP PERIODICALS are truly called the Useful Arts, will, so far as CHEAP PERIODICALS are in Britain of rather space permits, be attended to with the degree of ancient, and of most respectable lineage. They interest due to their importance, as the chief in. are older, by half, than two-thirds of the House struments, under the guidance of a gracious Pro- of Peers, and all of them are the descendants of vidence, of all the civilization and improvement great men. The first, The Review, was projected which mark the highest condition of the human by De Foe.

It appeared three times a week. family. The mariner's compass and the steam- The next Penny Paper was the Tatler-project engine have already done more for the world than ed by Steele, and supported by the contributions all the conquerors that ever carried “arts and of Addison and Swift, and the greatest Wits (as arms” into barbarous regions. The printing press they were termed) of that day. It was followed has done more for mankind than all the law. by the Spectator and the Guardian. The Tatler makers that ever lived. What has it still to sold at a penny ; but was not, in 1709, nearly half accomplish !—It shall be the constant, as it is the the size which the Schoolmaster is, more than a highest aim of this Miscellany to accelerate its century later, and was very inferior in appearance, progress and extend its power. To the young, The effect of these great little works was pro THE SCHOOLMASTER will study to supply, digious, as may be gathered from contemporary along with useful information and subjects for in- writers, and especially from Swift's Journal. Of tellectual exercise, snatches of that graceful and the Spectator, 20,000 were occasionally sold ;

which, humanizing light literature with which contempor- it would be no exaggeration to say, was more for ary times abound.

that time than a half million of penny papers As this small Miscellany is intended for the would be now, when the popjılation of London Many for the great mass of the People that has increased so prodigiously, and readers in a mighty class from which in every country the much larger proportion ; while steam, and canals, greatest men have arisen,- from which in our island, and coaches have connected with the Metropolis and almost in our own day, have sprung a Burns, all those hives of industry in Lancashire, Yorks a CULLEN, a Cook, a FERGUSON, a Wart,-as al- shire, Warwickshire, and the West of Scotland. most without any exception all great men have After a lapse of thirty years, Johnson, in 17-50, arisen from among the people, we shall, in catering commenced the Rambler. It appears to have been for them, address ourselves at once as if to the sold at twopence, and was published every Mon. best order of capacities; and with “milk for day and Saturday for two years. The number babes” that will yet be men, furnish food " for sold was only 500! The property belonged to a strong men,” believing that our world is now old bookseller, who paid the writer four guineas aenough to relish the fitting nourishment of mas- week. To make amends for this tardy success, culine intellects. If this plan shall be less imme. Johnson lived to see ten editions of the collected

work printed and sold. Had the Rambler been charms-proudly drew the minnow, and named it allowed to go by post, at a small charge, at least trout, from Braid's Burn; rifled, monster-like, the ten times the number must have been sold then. linnet's nest, on the “uncultured breast” of BlackTwo years after its decease, Johnson 'undertook ford, sought our rural or silvan prey throughout the Idler, which also existed two years; the natu- all the land of Egypt, extending a traveller's right ral limit, it would seem, of the cheap periodicals of of conquest over Canaan, meditating spoils in those days. Franklin is to be enrolled among the the gardens of Goshen, taking personal possession ancestors of the cheap periodicals. His Poor of all the fair domains of St. Cuthbert, and exRichard: Almanack was, in its own land and day, tending our rambling dominion where the scarlet among the most valuable of these publications. coat of postman not yet illumines the solitude, and Upwards of fifty years ago, the Mirror was be- where only the persevering foot of Chronicle gun in this city. The principal papers were con- deliverer-slow but sure, dilatory, but the more tributed by Henry Mackenzie, the Man of Feeling. welcome-makes its adventurous way. But from It had some sale in England; but no very great these old familiar places we must stoically turn. success anyway, in point of numbers. It has, We are bound on higher hests; and our very starthowever, often been reprinted. The Mirror was ing post is at the distance of a Sabbath-day's jourfollowed by the Lounger, which was supported by ney of our simpler years. the same writers. The Bee, a utilitarian small pe It is not without reason we choose the Rail-way riodical, was conducted by Dr. Anderson, in Edin- Waggon. We like the quiet unexpensive pleasures burgh, and contained many good papers. About which " after no repenting draws.” As we propose twenty years ago, Mr. James Hogg projected the being the guide of as many of the SchoolMASTER'S Spy, and has humorously recorded its fortune. pupils as will put themselves under our care in this Within the last seven years, many little periodi- excursion, we recommend them to breakfast with cals have risen and flourished for a time, and then what appetite they may; and, “according to their been forgotten. But good they must have done, several circumstances,” make preparation for the even the humblest of them; and their effects, creature-comforts of the day, whether in huntingthough they may never become visible or tangible, pouch, fishing-basket, or the neat willowy reticule are no doubt beneficially felt in some quarter or borne by more delicate fingers. And now we stride other. The cause of failure, generally speaking, off

, all through Lady Nicolson's Park, and down the has been the want of some presiding mind to give Cross-Causey : the Castle of Clouts' towers in the little work tone and consistency of purpose. sight, Gibbet Toll, “ that was,” in the distance. They were generally some third or fourth-rate There are many things here to awaken boyish rebookseller's temporary speculation, who employed miniscences. There were bickers in those days! some poor literary wight, who cut with the scissors, Under the auspices of St. Catherine of Sienna, right and left, without either judgment or discri- the patroness of skirmishing, how often has our mination, as long as any one would buy.

side beat them back from the sacred precincts

named for her, which stocking-weavers call the HOLYDAY RAMBLES ROUND EDINBURGH. Sciennes, and march-of-intellect men, not quiet

perfect in their orthography, Science Street.BY ZACHARY ZIGZAG, ESQ.

But these glories are all past : their memory we leave in charge of

JS, best No. I.-The RAIL-WAY.

of local antiquaries—the modest, unknown AshNo eity like to thee, our own dear and venerable mole of Edina ; and the new streets and feus to Mother! whether in variety, beauty, or scope of the care of Mr. Grubb, and the Improvements' scenery. Youth, gaiety, and fashion are prome- Commission ; for we are now at the Depot, in the nading in thy most princely Prince's Street-love midst of coal cabinets, coal binge, .coal carters, and romance strolling in thy parks and gardens, black, grey, and red, and waggons of every form bravery and hoar tradition are enthroned on all thy and hue, -where, some five years back, we could sit encircling hills! What picturesque outstepping, under trees, or in hop-vine bowers, sucking honey

-round the fringed, breezy brow of thy Corstor.blobs, and green Gascoignes ; another sense regaled phine, looking smiling down on the blue smoke of all the while by the profuse fragrance of Mr. Ba. quiet Craigcruik !-round the coroneted front of chelor,-gentlest name, of gentlest culler of simples thy stately Salisbury, or the crest of thy couchant for the maidens and matrons of Edinburgh. But Lion, thy peerless, noble Arthur! Well do we here comes the Waggon ;, and as the eyes of th know all thy beauties; and fondly and reverently world are on us, we must now act, if possible, lik could we expatiate on them, and the delights they a rational creature. We are snugly dove-taile.., have yielded us, since at four we could just toddle about sixteen Christian souls in the space allotted over the stiles, and tumble our short length into to ten bodies ; but good-humour is a first-rate the daisied lap thou spreadest for thy children in bundler :-so off we go !--The rolling down the thy King's Park

Tunnel* is not quite the MOUNTAINS at Paris ; but Speering no bold Baron's leave

it is a much finer thing in its way. Still finer is it to till the bold Saturday, school-boy ventures, of reck any part of the Whig administration in the Tunnel, and

* Mr. Fox, we understand, denies the breaking down of less twelve, explored thy remoter and more bidden I we must believe what we wish true.

emerge from its gloom, with the giant iron Ribs of sible-looking person of fifty, or, by're lady, inSampson, two hundred feet almost sheer overhead, clining to threescore. The swell of his breastand neighbouring them the fretted rock-work of pocket shews a well-stuffed pocketbook, under the breechless western hip of Arthur. The scene the broad-skirted pepper-and-salt coat, and bodes nere is indeed striking. The beautiful grounds of corn exchanges in the market-place of Dalkeith, Prestonfield, or Priestfield, on the right, and on before the dinner hour, with the farmers of Ford, the other hand, the upward magnificent sweep of Crichton, Borthwick, Temple, or Newbattle paArthur's Seat, leading on by the little placid Loch, rishes. He is a middle-man, between the granaries to the romantic village church of Duddingstone, and of the Lothians and the devouring maw of the the plantations of Lord Abercprn. We might pause manufactories of the West. He is a stanch Radi. here, but could not get beyond the city of the bone- cal, I find, on every point save the Corn Laws; of bridges of antiquity, and of the “ roaring curlers” that only he is “ not clear.” This may account of modern times, for this week, were the tempta- for his observations to my inquiring neighbour the tion not manfully resisted : :-so turn we to willowy matron, as, waving his umbrella-staff abroad, like Pepper or Peffer Mill, with its cool cattle-pool and a magician's wand-paying his way, and careless natural meadows, finer to our thinking than any of who hears, he cries :—" Ay, all that good corn. young upstart villa of its acquaintance. The Rail- land, every rig, from his gate in the high street of way here is most enviously shut up by high dead Dalkeith, down to Inveresk Kirk—the manors o' stone walls. The same spirit has been at work, Smeaton and Castlesteads or were they baronies ? which has demolished the stiles, and shut up the old locked into his park; and two running water: keppt pleasant path leading across the meadows to Dud- in't for his pleasure. What a sight o' mills and dingstone. Say, ye Road Trustees, whither has engines that stretch o' ground might support ! it vanished ?—that sweet path “ traversed so oft in what a bee-hive of industry, and nest of comforlife's morning march.” With the recollection of table homes for hundreds on hundreds o'puir its delicious freshness the veteran L had bodies, and their bits o' bairns !” cooled himself in the burning plains of India. “ What a quantity of oatmeal they would conWhen he returned three years ago, and found this sume !" cried a somewhat waggish youth on my haunt of boyhood for ever gone, the echoes of Arthur right, whose japanned case boded botanical research, prolonged the Soldier's malison,—which we must not though a small copy of Grahame's Birds of Scotrepeat, lest Mr Thomson, who, from yon distant land starting from the waistcoat pocket, spoke of upper window of the Manse, is doubtless making something else on an idling holyday. a sketch of the Waggon, might overhear the some “ Ay, just sae," said the man of meal-the what profane denunciation of all heartless, fanci. champion of productive industry-quite satisfied less, brainless Road Trustees. The sketch, which with this ironical crowning of his climax ; but my we shall perhaps see in the Exhibition next spring, matron neighbour put in a woman's word for “ the if “ nobody buys” before then, comprehends Our Duke.” She had seen “ the Park in auld Deuke Waggon, sweeping through the thick foliagem Henry's time, and in the time o' the auld Duchess ; Craigmillar Castle in the distance—Priestfield in and a beautifu' sight it was, with the hairy man, the middle distance, and here and there, a chance- [orang-outang,]the hermitage, and the creatures o' bedropt tree ;-storied Craigmillar, where “beau- deers-hundreds o' them, like sheep." teous Mary' bathed in wine, saith tradition, and “ And would five hundred, or, as John Storie became more beautiful even in the cruel languish.. has calculated,' nearer five thousand, men, wives, ment of her imprisonment !

and bairns, with their bits o' snug cot-houses and It is only now that we find time to look round kail-yards about the banks and holms; their rose

our travelling companions. A respectable bushes, grozerts, and apple-renzie, as ye see in the young shopkeeper, his wife, and three children ; West; and may-be a pig and a bees' skep or twam Peggy, the lass, too, her hands full enough with the no been as bonny a sight, think ye, gudewife, baby and the basket. There is a younger sister whether taking their stoup o' wholesome ale, after also, and a young man, likely enough, if things go their labours were over on a Saturday night, or well, by the diligent culture of five years, to ripen praising their Maker in the Kirk on a Sabbath ?" into a sober lover. It is a family holyday. That said my friend, who, spite of his comfortable conold lady in the dark shawl, her smile of quiet ex- tours, and good cleeding, I now suspected of invecitement only now taking place of the rigid hor- terate radicalism. rors of the tunnel, goes but as far as Lugton-Path, “ That's the sight I ne'er saw there," replied the to see an old neighbour, and obtain change of air matron meekly ; so I cannot say. But the auld for her grandchild, the sickly, pale little girl who Duchess was a kind woman to beast and body. leans on her. She has not been this way since her And what this man has is his own, surely?" daughter (“the lassie's mother") married; but “Ay, so it is, mistress; but how came it to be “this is so reasonable ;” and she speaks of the Rail- sae-sae muckle o't ?-can ye tell me that?" way Waggon affectionately as of an obliging living “ From his forbears, I daur-to-say; and I hope female creature, and the “ power of good she he remembers who is the Giver of all, and is a kind would do the bairns.”

man to the poor, and to his tenantry." Opposite me is a sturdy, square-set, 'spon “ And where got they—the forbears, I mean

on

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