The British Poets: Including Translations ...

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C. Whittingham, 1822
 

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第 190 頁 - The impetuous song, and say from whom you rage. His praise, ye brooks, attune, ye trembling rills; And let me catch it as I muse along. Ye headlong torrents, rapid and profound; Ye softer floods, that lead the humid maze Along the vale; and thou, majestic main, A secret world of wonders in thyself, Sound His stupendous praise, whose greater voice Or bids you roar, or bids your roarings fall.
第 225 頁 - I care not, Fortune, what you me deny : You cannot rob me of free Nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face ; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve: Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave : Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
第 190 頁 - Works in the secret deep ; shoots, steaming, thence The fair profusion that o'erspreads the Spring ; Flings from the Sun direct the flaming day ; Feeds every creature ; hurls the tempest forth ; And, as on earth this grateful change revolves. With transport touches all the springs of life.
第 198 頁 - Sent forth a sleepy horror through the blood ; And where this valley winded out, below, The murmuring main was heard, and scarcely heard, to flow.
第 17 頁 - He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius; he looks round on Nature and on Life with the eye which Nature bestows only on a poet; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which imagination can delight to be detained, and with a mind that at once comprehends the vast, and attends to the minute.
第 163 頁 - Attract his slender feet. The foodless wilds Pour forth their brown inhabitants. The hare, Though timorous of heart, and hard beset By death in various forms, dark snares, and dogs, And more unpitying men, the garden seeks, Urged on by fearless want. The bleating kind Eye the bleak heaven, and next the glistening earth, With looks of dumb despair ; then, sad dispersed, Dig for the withered herb through heaps of snow.
第 34 頁 - Deep-struck, and runs out all the lengthened line ; Then seeks the farthest ooze, the sheltering weed, The caverned bank, his old secure abode;* And flies aloft, and flounces round the pool, Indignant of the guile. With yielding hand, That feels him still, yet to his furious course Gives way, you, now retiring, following now Across the stream, exhaust his idle rage ; Till, floating broad upon his breathless side, And to his fate abandoned, to the shore You gaily drag your unresisting prize.
第 174 頁 - We, shifting for relief, would play the shapes Of frolic fancy ; and incessant form Those rapid pictures, that assembled train Of fleet ideas, never join'd before, Whence lively Wit excites to gay surprise ; Or folly-painting Humour, grave himself, Calls Laughter forth, deep-shaking every nerve.
第 190 頁 - Where, o'er the rock, the scarcely waving pine Fills the brown shade with a religious awe. And ye whose bolder note is heard afar, Who shake the astonished world, lift high to heaven The impetuous song, and say from whom you rage.
第 164 頁 - Smoothed up with snow ; and, what is land unknown, What water, of the still unfrozen spring, In the loose marsh or solitary lake, Where the fresh fountain from the bottom boils.

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