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festant, and as she was educated in her had this day listened to all that seemed so Lard Mowbray, a perlert Pruleus when he mother's persuasion. No further ditti unlikely to interest a boy of my age, my wished to please, strated his mantet sexe culty remains, and Harrington receives attier, with a smile and a walk, and a sute couvely from that of ite se lamentas lover the hand of his mistress.

nod of his head, not meant, I suppose, for to that of the pulite Balans, and aestholm It will add to the interest of thuis en puinted me out to the company, hy whon ipucered, he had recourse tw philwauptes, ica

me to see, but which I noticed the more,fed man of the world, and when this did the tertaining tale to know, that it was writo was unanimously agreed that my attention son, and benevolence. trn in consequence of a letter which Miss was a proof of uncutomun abilities, and an about, whxh cuotin; anul achieste.1.14 Edgeworth received from an American carly decuded taste tur feabilic benespture to tuis purpose, was lost opussa M. Jewers

, complaining of the illiberality with Young Lord Mowbray, a boy some year way. Mrs. tales iad waruied nie da! which the Jewish nation bad been treated older than moselt, a gawkee schwebtwy, was Miss Musienetu was tomashy on the Jewish in sotue of her former works.

present; and had, duning this long hour Aapier, aud bis kurdskup was aware at * 45

atter dinner, manifested sundry symptoms as the champun of the Jews that it is? We now proceed to make some ex ot impatience, and maje mariy vaio e tutto teen faventally reprvenied to Jacobs, and tracts,

to get me out of the room. After crackioz tavourabiy received by Jer Montenete, The scene where his father strengthens tots nuts and his nul-shells, and the crack wa Lord Huwbrar a peared to te deeply his juvenile antipathy towards Jews is ing the cracked, after suppressing the trek interested, and deeply sean m everything well described.

coming yawns that at last wuld no longer for that had been written in their favour. There was at this time, during a recess of suppreswd, he had risen, writted, etreiched, lle tumarloves Toscyand () niew,

, and Parliament, some intention among the Lon and had tarly taken hun et out of the rout Presvley's better to the Jews, atid I'he latters dua merctatits to send addresses to Govern. And tw be just perped in, to see if he could of certaint Jean de Ul. Je l' Umure, weseluarkan neat in larutir of the Jews; and address lempt me forth to play.

whub be low cultuually quoted 10 tier. *ete to be procured from the country. The

"No, no," chied me father, " you ll not get salsun. country members, and among them, of course,

llarrington, I'm atrand, he is too deep here in With great address loe muadered that le twy tailur, were willen to; but he was politics--but, however, Ilarnington, my dear hou never ha pescu w meet with them t..! fuímusiy agajust the naturalisalon : he con bowy, 'lis but the thoug for your young conpawels, and contened, that he teisesed Le sadered all who were for it as enemies to non-foot and play with duwbray--but never stod have to be ut reading them, Hugiand, and, I believe, to religion. He ran way, torst, the mouse been one of us so bul that really the subject head ul iale beste duwu to the (vuntry to take the sense of his lonx, *val lave we teen talkin: up *** Cutiaiituents, or to impress them with his

" I he Jews, to be sure, Papa."

so ableresting mense of the business, Previous to some in.

" Right," cued my tallet --" and what Jews, and of the thing at Prussia • 1 * **

Of Voltarr's tuberal attacks ngare the Ieladed cuatry merung; there were, i se about them, my deard mel<r, vannis dinners of constituents al

** Whether they ought to be let live in

ance towards tivern, le coudrerer eur my tatt.er's, and attempts after dinger over a England, of any where

sut*x seul detestatson, nor and te erst dulb buttee of wine, tu «tuvince them that thry bizhe 184in, that is right in the main,"rently estu (umbertami a " Biese veest werp, we ought to be of my father's opinwon, cried my father thurugh that is a larger Quvlat solis

tretie use of the vihet see on.com that they had better all juin hun in the view of the subject than we touch." last of " s'ke Jeas are down, and keep'em * And what reasons did you heas ** sadalay to readiness

, uttered with all the ar Quan gentleman in conspany.

of a twin so deepeş im popesad with <<maia A sus' sect apparently less likely to interra! ** Reasons !'* interrupted my father, -0h

I sentiments, that they thrusunanay mint

from him on every wiastuu. Tulevard a stade of my abe, than thorn Act of ParliaSi, to call upon the boy for all the teamas E": atade ihe naturalisation of the Jews, top has heard. - but you'll not pose hum perceive to be in ita: a.sauf what lorem

had seen tue,

rith the, ainda tuta K.'! boardins lucer imagined, but from my pereak out, speak up, Harrington, my house ** ou at asuxiatuns it duet attract my attention

"l've notting to say about reasonin..ST.

Dottie flattered Biyolinerrig. that bro.. I *: curling to know what my father and

** So; that was tout à fait question and

was utk kui riced it but a n by

the countertest Ite after ab 4* **** al the gentlemet eie w in abunut the father but my boyu

fully manage with a deels of lus uutta afs Jees as the dinners, trom which uy mother wihale you are, dont vous in and the lacties were excluded I was eager

* To be sure, on your side, father."

ner, il vugla tle winste presvug an auf s sam my privadeze of watching into the

“ Tia tight-bravo !-lo know

nature and (Lausteix-liial ke hal al

lhe appearance of a persaluse ter daing room alles donner, and taking in wo side oix is, is one great point in hte lawlee my fall.er's ell, and then I

* And I can feil on whxt de every one

stan!... 16.11aly hleraie land, at vim pallia wull gradual i polip myself on, all I 2018 loete is 'I hen going tuund the table,

(ular select, bra subur..y Watled and peu oftalt lis chair, atod establitora touxe hed the shoulder oi cac to of the company. Thasted by the passata uf duvé.

The centrstent was w exquisite, 11 at 1 a plate but my ellow on the table Item&INK, " Jew, "--"* Su Jew," and bursts vi

withstanding mv (or Duence in her fators bazewkes one day sung tur an bonut lisgriber, "pprune ensures ap 35, &c. Bisiteston Invas wir bernua watulber as eacts The following account of Lord Mow.penetratuan, and to her talent of dem erste #fake, txapelor of cuiuperbe inding theu ar- bray's attacks ou the heart of Berenier wisat was batutai and strat *** a ***, ! Faalisent, but fully under landing the ve deserve insettun.

dreaded best tey sudd bwib bornfessed

up. Resuene of their tsines, and »mpattusinsin Lund Chesterfield's style of conversation, tl vanlig capresswa of passion, and as and that of any of the propte in empeon's

li las ofteabroo nd, the four love nord Bu test, quite satished with making out you adre, cousd not be these diterenie, ons tot wat we mur et lustray tiad as an wter to speaker was fur, and whaaha aamuse, es cueu paribie, than the simpuesty at Nis seen! ***?, tuit vel i *48 16 ***** the Jews Vontrnero, and the wit ut luxd Nowbray.

curnt tur ais tasime 2

*** Al tiwne bo were against the Jews, I I never saw a man of wit so furried anet

He retra dute!! a. ' * *!** ses Bodered as my talher's frienals; all these provoked as he was bv a chanter of ge ut tiesin , fut doub'! ! it w were in the Jews, I called by a communaune simply. He was as much west

1.tr'it 11, 1. pisl, le 1.08 €11, of me 1:36:viny of the passas, my hnee met wit's such a phawit. as any web muured thal n.1 aly, but lue 1.'. et's er pres, teclise my talles was the front buren in Humuli'nin tale, Ikotgut that any tinh cuand bar seu lupe ..! thor enemy To lering of party am wand bette. Ute with a flaman up a bref that puadial ! le fue the team af retro wted to a cambit by ctub'seni as que hly as refsan ma'no-4* mun h at a la as vu ! "e tous

u koum 1, eräsity ** tetraed by 0.5, w cuated the true gre temen in winteplass alle lis, 2 al anut every lacks & 16 stressgtl.eu si utc, auj w elavpetals my night tid taimselt, if consemed to be ablative tu lle* ** $7.1. but... ey pref***8.3.

parte maison de lanbides vi Soptasses quest*, in whale ilgil 30. W.1200 Aslväsiutu wy Uit alles with wuch ljus o Ludzpulet,

tatu au bis diughiu had two cou, houd

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party spirit and his want of toleration for bility, and wild and boundless exultation to | When first they strove their downward gace to other sects broke out. p. 323, &c. a popular mind, of all others the deepest and till

We find we must defer our Review of firmest to receive the mightier impressions. With the full grandeur of their glorious prize " Ormond" till our vext number.

On this intellectual ocean the tempest of a Paris!-the name that from their cradle still time unequalled in human vicissitude, was let Stung them in dreams: now, glittering in their

eyes, PARIS, IN 1815, A POEM.

loose, and when its magnificent heavings had It has been justly observed, that English subsided, its old boundaries were to be found Now won-won by the Victory of Victories! poetry has, within these few years, changed no longer; the innumerable little erections for this, had bled their battle round the world; its characteristics. From the laborious that idleness or absurdity had erected as if For this, they round the world had come to war pomp

of Johnson, and the polished epigram to limit that vast and unfathomed mass of Some, with the shattered ensign that unfurled of Pope, down to the affected sentiment of force had been carried away, and a new soil And some, the blue Atlantic stemming far; the Hayley

and Della Cruscan school, all created for a new and boliler architecture. And somne, a matchless band from swarthy Spain, has been cleared away, and the ground úlled other causes may have assisted in the great with well-worn steel, and breasts of many a up with a “ building of immortal verse," developement of the English mind within that restoring us to the natural and vigorous the last quarter of a century;—but in our And all their plains to their last conquering

plain tastes of the English mind, promises to live poetry the result has been a passion for as long as nature in its vigour has power thought, for nervous compression, for daring Were sport, and all their trophies to this trophy

vain. beyond feeble and quaint affectation. All originality, for the out-pouring of the whole our tastes had hitherto been imported. Our feeling of the whole man, even in its rude- And there are symbols round the Mount that

sbow admiratiou had been solicited to faded copies ness, if in its truth; and an utter loathing of French and Italian design. The sickly of the old affectations of language, and sen- What terror on the boastful land has been; and artificial forms of feeling in those arti-timent, of full-dress phrase, and sickly sen-Glares from its embrasures the iron row,

With scarp and fosse is cut the tender green, ficial countries had been erected as standards sibility:

Our limits in this review are restricted by The steel-barb'd frize, the pyramid of ball,

The howitz watches down the spiked ravine, for the stature and proportion of English gevius, and the highest praise of the poet the variety of matter which it is the pur- Start on the eye from cot and vintage-screen: twenty years since was to have left no line pose of our Journal to lay before the reader

, And from the summit tower, the flag-staff tall unpainted by personal satire, pedantic conand we shall therefore make our few extracts Lifts England's banner'd cross —

- triumphant ceit, or fashionable allusion. We had from the poem of“ Paris in 1815," without

over all. learned grimace froin its regular professors, further observation than that in a brief pre- The gale has come —at once the fleecy haze and a Court dress was indispensable for the face it announces itself as the writing of Floats up,--then stands a purple canopy, poetry which desired to be received

among

a visitant at Paris in the memorable year in Shading the Imperial City from the blaze. the wise or the wealthy, the fair and the which the concluding blow was given to Glorious the vision! tower and temple lie polite, the accomplished distributors of Napoleon, that it gives descriptions of the Beneath the morn, like waves of ivory, praise, and the potent wielders of patronage. prominent objects of the capital, and that with many an azure streak, and gush of green, Where the inspiration was administered by ihe author's view of them is taken chiefly in As grove and garden on the dazzled eye drawing rooms, excellence must be gradu- connexion with their revolutionary celebrity. Rise in successive beauty, and between, ated by the connexion of the poet with high We make the extracts as they casually meet Flows into sudden light the loog, slow, serpent

Seine. life; the boudoir was thus ihe Parnassus.us. The first view is at morning from

The traveller then leaves the Mount and In this arrangement the multitude were ex- Montmartre, at that time a British quarter. cluded. The infinite and splendid resources The spectator is glancing round the horizon plunges into the darkness and crowd of of poetic feeling open through the outer still shadowed with the early vapours. Paris, sees the Abbaye prison, and recollects of society, general, rich, and powerful St. Cloud ! How stately from the green hill's sketches the general aspects of the Streets

the detail of massacres of September; range as the sunlight and the air, were contemned side in the eagerness to force a meagre and Shoots up thy Parian pile! His transient hold, from them all' by meeting the Royal Pro

and the people, and is suddenly abstracted exotic luxuriancy in the narrow confine of Who wore the iron crown of Regicide! art and ceremonial that struts in upper life, He treads its halls no more--his hour is told.

cession on its way to Notre Dame, previously

to the opening of the Chambers. We have and poetry was rapidly degenerating into The circle widens ; Sevres bright and cold the state where its most illustrious employ- Peeps out in vestal beauty from her throne, room only for ihe stanzas in which he speaks ment would be found amolig birthday odes, Spared for Minerva's sake, when round' her of the Church service. elegies on lapdogs, mottos for Albums, and from yon high brow the Invader's fiery zone,

The pile is full; and oh, what splendoars there sonnets to “an eye-brow.” We have sud- Resistiess, as can tell thy faded towers, Mendon! The Gothic shapes, fantastic, yet austere ;

Rush in thick tumult on the entering eye! denly plunged into a different order of being. A trumpet!-at the sound Mont Martre's spread, The altar's crown of seraplı imagery; The poetry of England, as if by an irresisti- With martial crowds, a glittering, crimson tide Champion and king thai on their tombstones bile sympathy, sprung into strength and Pouring incessant from its sun-bright head lie, splendour with the national cause, and the Part, that in splendour deepen down its side,

Now clustered deep with beauty's living bloom; most signal struggle that ever tried and en- lo square and line, and columo wheeling wide And glanced from shadowy stall and alcove nobled the arms of a people, seemed sent not To many a solemn touch of harmony.

high, less to elevate the national genius to the Part, to the far champaign that clanging ride, Like new-born light thro' that mysterious gloom, most stately supremacy.

Like the long flashes of the Summer sky, The gleam of warrior steel, the toss of warrior All our present poetry has been born and Like fresh pluined eagles from their aery high. plume. matured with the war against France. Ba- The British bands ! a power is in the sound ! The organ peals ;-at once, as some vast ware, con observes that inind like the works of It speaks of freedom, virtue, valour nigh Bend to the earth the mighty multitude, nature enlarges in all its proportions toge- It calls up England upon foreign ground ! Silent as those pale emblems of the grave ther. The war which raised up among us Far be from us the false philosophy

Io monumental marble round them strew'd. in thay hour of the world's darkness, the That owns not Country's nobly-partial tie ! Low at the Altar, forms in cope and hood successive splendors of those statesmen and in distance and in death to fix the eye

The thoughts that like a second nature come Superb with gold wrought cross and diamond heroes, whose light is still living on our On the heart's classic soil,-by temple, tomb,

twine, eye, though their forms have obeyed the By all Jove's names endeard--by all in one, Toss their untiring censers ronad the shrine,

As in the pile, alone with life endued, general law, and gone down from before us, gave energy to the whole spirit of the peo- War has its mighty moments :- Heart of man!

our Home.

Where on the throne of clouds the Virgin sits

divine. ple. The occasional privations, the fierce Have all thy pulses vigoar for a thrill hazards, the dazzling successes of that mys- Prouder than thro' those gallant bosomis ran,

Gorgeous! but love I not such pomp of prayer;

Il bends the heart mid mortal luxury, terious and soleinn time, were made to give When first their standards waved above wiat Rather let me the meek devotion share, boldness and majesty, tragic depth of 'senși bill ;

Where in their silent gleos and thickcu hight,

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testant, and as she was educated in her had this day listened to all that seemed so Lord Mowbray, a persect Proteus when he mother's persuasion. No further diffi- unlikely to interest a boy of my age, my wished to please, changed his manner succulty remains, and Harrington receives father, with a smile and a wink, and a side cessively from that of ihe sentimental lover the hand of his mistress.

nod of his head, not meant, I suppose, for to that of the polite gallant, and accomplish

me to see, but which I noticed the more, ed man of the world, and when this did not It will add to the interest of this en-pointed me out to the company, hy whom it succeed, he had recourse to philosophy, reatertaining tale to know, that it was writ- was unanimously agreed that my attention son, and benevolence. ten in consequence of a letter which Miss was a proof of uncommon abilities, and an No hint, which cunning and address could Edgeworth received from an American early decided taste for public business. improve to his purpose, was lost upon MowJewess, complaining of the illiberality with Young Loid Mowbray, a boy some years bray. Mrs. Coates had warned me that which the Jewish nation had been treated older than myself, a gawkee school-boy, was Miss Montenero was touchy on the Jewish in some of her former works.

present; and had, during this long hour chapter, and his lordship was aware it was We now proceed to make some ex-of impatience, and made many vain efforts heen favourably represented by Jacob, and

after dinner, manifested sundry symptoms as the champion of the Jews, that I had first tracts.

to get me out of the room. After cracking favourably received by Mr Montenero.The scene where his father strengthens his nuts and his nut-shells, and thrice crack - Soon Lord Mowbray appeared to be deeply his juvenile antipathy towards Jews is ing the cracked, after suppressing the thick interested, and deeply read in every thing well described.

coming yawns that at last could no longer be that had been written in their favour. There was at this time, during a recess of suppressed, he had risen, writhed, stretched, He rummaged over Tovey and Ockley; and Parliament, some intention among the Lon- and had fairly taken himself out of the room. Priestley's leiters to the Jews, and The Letters don merchants to send addresses to Govern. And now he just peeped in, to see if he could of certain Jews to M. de Voltaire, were books ment in favour of the Jews; and addresses tempt me forth to play

which he now continually quoted in conver. were to be procured from the country. The

“ No, no," cried my father," you'll not get sation. country inembers, and among them, of course, Harrington, I'm afraid, he is too deep here in

With great address he wondered that he my father, were written to; but he was politics—but, however, Harrington, my dear had never happened to meet with them till furiously against the naturalization : he con- boy, 'tis not the thing for your young compa- lately; and confessed, that he believed he sidered all who were for it as enemies to nion-go off and play with Mowbray—but never should have thought of reading them, England; and, I believe, to religion. He ran stay, first, since you've been one of us so but that really the subject had of late become down to the country to take the sense of his long, what have we been talking of?"

so interesting constituents, or to impress them with his

“The Jews, to be sure, Papa.”

Of Voltaire's illiberal attacks upon the sense of the business. Previous to some in

Right,” cried my father—" and what Jews, and of the King of Prussia's intolertended country meeting; there were, I re

about them, my dear?" member, varios dinners of constituents at

“Whether they ought to be let live in sufficient detestation, nor could he ever suffi

ance towards them, he could never express my father's, and attempts after dinner over a England, or any where?"

ciently extol Cumberland's “ Benevolent bottle of wine, to convince them that they

. Right agaia, that is right in the main," Jew," or Lessing's “ Nathan the Wise." were, or ought to be of my father's opinion, cried my father, though that is a larger Quotations from one or the other were conand that they had better all juin him in the view of the subject than we took.” toast of The Jews are down, and keep 'em

" And what reasons did you hear?" said a of a man so deeply impressed with certain

tinually in readiness, uttered with all the air down."

gentleman in company. A subject apparently less likely to interest “Reasons!" interrupted my father, _On sentiments, that they involuntarily burst

from bim on every occasion. This I could a child of my age, than this Act of Parlia-Sir

, to call upon the boy for all the reasons also perceive to be in invitation of what he ment about the naturalization of the Jews, he has heard. -- but you'll not pose him had seen succeed with ine; and I was not a could hardly be imagined, but from my pe- Speak out, speak up, Harrington, my boy." culiar associations it did attract my attention.

“ I've nothing to say about reasoning, Sir."

little fattered by observiog, that Berenice I was curious to know what my father and

No; that was not a fair question," said the counterfeit. The affectation was skil

was unconsciously pleased if not caught by all the gentlemen were saying about the my father" but, my boy, you know on fully managed with a dash of his own manJews at these dinners, from which my mother which side you are, and the ladies were excluded. I was eager

To be sure, on your side, father."

ner, through the whole preserving an air of

nature and consistency-so that he had all to claim my privilege of marching into the

“ That's right-bravo !-To know..con the appearance of a person whose underdining-room after dinner, and taking my

which side one is, is one great point in life.” stand beside my father's elbow, and then I

“And I can tell on which side every one cular subject, been suddenly warmed and

standing, naturally liberal, had, on one parti, would gradually edge myself on, till I got

here is." Then going round the table, I exalted by the passion of love. possession of half his chair, and established touched the shoulder of each of the company, a place for my elbow on the table. I re- saying, " A Jew,"_" No Jea," and bursts of The counterfeit was so exquisite, that not

withstanding my confidence in her father's meinber one day sitting for an hour together, applause ensued.-p. 35, &c. turning from one person to another as each

The following account of Lord Mow- penetration, and is her talent of discerning spoke, incapable of comprehending their ar- bray's attacks on the heart of Berenice dreaded lest they should both be imposed

what was natural and what was affected, I guments, but fully understanding the ve-deserve insertion. hemence of their iones, and sympathising in Lord Chesterfield's style of conversation,

upon. . the varying expression of passion; and as and that of any of the people Xenophon's

It has often been said, that liars lave need to the rest, quite satisfied with making out Cyropædia, could not be inore different, or

of good memories. Mowbray had really an which speaker was for, and which against, less compatible, than the simplicity of Miss excellent memory, but yet it was not suffithe Jews. Montenero, and the wit of Lord Mowbray.

cient for all his occasions. All those who were against the Jews, I I never saw a man of wit so puzzled and

He contradicted himself sometimes withcousidered as my father's friends ; all those provoked as he was by a character of ge- uut perceiving it, but not without its being who were for the Jews, I called by a common muine simplicity: He was as much out of perceived. Intent upon one point, he la misnomer, or metonymy of the passions, my his element with such a character, as any of boured that admirably, but he sometimes father's enemies ; because my father was the French lovers in Marmontel's tales forgot that any thing could be seen beyond their enemy. The feeling of party spirit, would be tête-à-tête with a Roman or a Gre that point-be forgot the bearings and come which is caught by children as quickly as it can matron-as much at a loss as one of nexions. He never forgot his liberality is revealed by iner, now combined to the fine gentlemen in Congreve's plays about the Jews, and about every thing ree strengthen still more, and to exasperate my might find himself, if condemned to hold lative to ļlebrew ground; but on other raely prepossessions,

parley with one of the heroines of Sophocles questions, in which he thought Mr. MonteAstonished by the attention with which I or of Euripides,

nero and his daughter had no concern, bis

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It has been justly observed, that English subsided, its old boundaries were to be found for this, had bled their battle round the world,

party spirit and his want of toleration for (bility, and wild and boundless exultation to | When first they strove their downward gaze to other sects broke out. p. 323, &c.

a popular mind, of all others the deepest and fill We find we must defer our Review of firmest to receive the mightier impressions. With the fall grandeur of their glorious prize “ Orniond" till our vext number. On this intellectual ocean the tempest of a PARIS!--the name that from their cradle still time unequalled in human vicissitude, was let Stung them in dreams: now, glittering in their

eyes,
loose, and when its magnificent heavings had
PARIS, IN 1815, A POEM

Now won-won by the Victory of Victories ! poetry has, within these few years, changed no longer; the innumerable little erections its characteristics. From the laborious that idleness or absurdity had erected as if For this, they round the world had come to war of Pope, down to the affected sentiment of force had been carried away, and a new soil And some, the blue Atlantic stemming far; pomp of Johnson, and the polished epigram to limit that vast and unfathomed mass of Some, with the shattered ensign that unfurled the Hayley and Della Cruscan school, all created for a new and boliler architecture. And some, a matchless band from swarthy Spain, has been cleared away, and the ground blled other causes may have assisted in the great with

well-worn steel, and breasts of many a up with a building of immortal verse,'

developement of the English mind within that restoring us to the natural and vigorous the last quarter of a century ;—but in our And all their plains to their last conquering

plain tastes of the English mind, promises to live poetry the result has been a passion for as long as nature in its vigour has power thought, for nervous compression, for daring Were sport, and all their trophies to this trophy

vain. beyond feeble and quaint affectation. All originality, for the out-pouring of the whole our tastes had hitherto been imported. Our feeling of the whole man, even in its rude-And there are symbols round the Mount that

show admiration had been solicited to faded copies ness, if in its truth; and an utter loathing of French and Italian design. The sickly of the old affectations of language, and sen-Wbat terror on the boastful land has been ; and artificial forms of feeling in those arti-timent, of full-dress phrase, and sickly sen-Glares from its embrasures the iron row,

With scarp and fosse is cut the tender green, ficial countries had been erected as standards sibility.

Our limits in this review are restricted by The steel-barb'd frize, the pyramid of ball,

The howitz watches down the spiked ravine, for the stature and proportion of English genius, and the highest praise of the poet the variety of matter which it is the pur- Start on the eye from cot and vintage-screen : Ewenty years since was to have left no line pose of our Journal to lay before the reader, And from the sumınit tower, the flag-staff tall unpainted by personal satire, pedantic con- and we shall therefore make our few extracts Lifts England's banner'd cross – triumphant ceit, or fashionable allusion. We had from the poem of“ Paris in 1815," without over all. learned grimace from its regular professors, further observation than that in a brief pre- The gale has come,-at once the fleecy haze and a Court dress was indispensable for the face it announces itself as the writing of Floats up, then stands a purple canopy, poetry

which desired to be received among a visitant at Paris in the memorable year in Shading the Imperial City from the blaze. the wise or the wealthy, the fair and the which the concluding blow was given to Glorious the vision! tower and temple lie polite, the accomplished distributors of Napoleon, that it gives descriptions of the Beneath the morn, like waves of ivory, praise, and the potent wielders of patronage. prominent objects of the capital, and that with many an azure streak, and gush of green, Where the inspiration was administered by ihe author's view of them is taken chiefly in As grove and garden on the dazzled eye drawing rooms, excellence must be gradu- connexion with their revolutionary celebrity. Rise in successive beauty, and between, ated by the connexion of the poet with high We make the extracts as they casually meet Flows into sudden light the long, slow, serpent

Seine. life; the boudoir was thus ihe Parnassus.

The first view is at morning from

The traveller then leaves the Mount and In this arrangement the multitude were ex- Montmartre, at that time a British quarter. cluded. The infinite and splendid resources The spectator is glancing round the horizon plunges into the darkness and crowd of of poetic feeling open through the outer still shadowed with the early vapours. Paris, sees the Abbaye prison, and recollects range of society, general, rich, and powerful St. Cloud ! How stately from the green hill's sketches the general aspects of the Streets

the detail of inassacres of September; as the sunlight and the air, were contemned side in the eagerness to force a meagre and Shoots up thy Parian pile! His transient hold, from them all' by meeting the Royal Pro

and the people, and is suddenly abstracted exotic luxuriancy in the narrow confine of Who wore the iron crown of Regicide! art and ceremonial that struts in upper life, He treads its halls no more-his bour is told.

cession on its way to Notre Dame, previously and poetry was rapidly degenerating into The circle widens ; Sevres bright and cold to the opening of the Chambers. We have the state where its most illustrious employ- Peeps ont in vestal beauty from her throne, room only for the stanzas in which he speaks ment would be found amolig birthday odes, Spared for Minerva's sake, when round' her of the Church service. elegies on lapdogs, mottos for Albums, and from yon high brow the Invader's fiery zone,

The pile is full; and oh, what splendours there sonnets to “an eye-brow.” We have sud- Resistless, as can tell thy faded towers, Meudon! The Gothic shapes, fantastic, yet austere;

Rush in thick tumult on the entering eye! denly plunged into a different order of being A trumpet !-at the sound Mont Martre's spread, The altar's crown of seraph imagery; The poetry of England, as if by an irresisti. With martial crowds, a glittering, crimson tide Champion and king that on their tombstones ble sympathy, sprung into strength and Pouring incessant from its snn-bright head lie, splendour with the national cause, and the Part, that in splendour deepen down its side, Now clustered deep with beauty's living bloom; most signal struggle that ever tried and en- lo square and line, and column wheeling wide And glanced from shadowy stall and alcove nobled the arms of a people, seemed sent not To many a solemn touch of harmony.

high, less to elevate the national genius to the Part, to the far champaign that clanging ride, Like new-born light thro' that mysterious gloom, most stately supremacy.

Like the long flashes of the Summer sky, The gleam of warrior steel, the toss of warrior All our present poeiry has been born and Like fresh pluined eagles from their aery high. plume. matured with the war against France. Ba- The British bands ! a power is in the sound ! The organ peals ;-at once, as some vast ware; con observes that inind like the works of It speaks of freedom, virtue, valour nigh Bend to the earth the mighty multitude, nature enlarges in all its proportions toge- It calls up England upon foreign ground ! Silent as those pale emblems of the grave ther. The war which raised up among us Far be from us the false philosophy

In modamental marble round them strew'd. in that hour of the world's darkness, the That owns not Country’s nobly-partial tie ! Low at the Altar, forms in cope and hood successive splendors of those statesmen and

The thoughts that like a second nature come Superb with gold wrought cross and diamond heroes, whose light is still living on our On the heart's classic soil,--by temple, tomb, In distance and in death to fix the eye

twine, eye, though their forms have obeyed the By all love's names endeard--by all' in one, Toss their untiring censers ronnd the shrine,

As in the pile, alone with life endued, general law, and gone down from before us,

our Home.

Where on the throne of clouds the Virgin sits gave energy to the whole spirit of the peo-War has its mighty moments :

divine. ple. The occasional privations, the fierce Have all thy pulses vigour for a thrill

Heart of man! hazards, the dazzling successes of that mys- Prouder than thro' those gallant bosons ran,

Gorgeous! but love I not such pomp of prayer ;

Ill bends the heart mid mortal luxury. terious and solemn time, were made to give When first their standards waved above that Rather let me the meek devotion share, boldness and majesty, tragic depth of sensi

Where in their silent gleos and thickets high,

us.

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England, thy lone and lowly chapels lie; himself to the dull country life here; many examining, an eruption of Vesuvius the
The spotless table by the eastern wall, pine after home. The farmer is, as I have victim of imprudent curiosity, this circum-
The marble, rudely traced with names gone by, already said, bis own master, he sells his stance alone would not perhaps have entitled
The pale-eyed pastor's simple, fervent call;

corn very well, pays his taxes, and does not him to hold a higher rank than Empedocles; Those deeper wake the heart, where heart is all want to buy any thing. The soil produces but he commanded the fleet of Misenum, in all,

him everything, and with a small capital, and if his first emotion was that of curiosity The poem then gives a rapid glance at the a laborious farmer can in a very short time on the sight of the phenomenon, his second Temple, where the Royal family were confined, prosper. An acre of uncleared land in a fine feelings prompted him to attempt the rescue at the Margue or receptacle for Suicides, the country and good soil costs two or three dol- of his vessels and the inhabitants of the Boulevards, the Tuileries, the Royal Apart- lars, of which ihe half is paid directly, and the towns on the coast. After having given ments, and the throne of Napoleon. This other half in six months. The population every necessary direction, he hastened to evidently comprehends but a portion of the of the United States is now eight millions; save one of his friends, who resided in a sights and singularities of the French me- but if the Europeans will continue to come retired spot, and thus perished in the fulfiltropolis

, but a second part is to follow; and as they have done from the year 1800, it will ment of the most affecting duty; it is for the subject may still have no fear of being in a short time be increased beyond calcula- this that we admire his courage and his exhausted. The present is about the length tion. Pennsylvania alone could maintain death. of Lurd Byron's minor poems.

on an extent of twenty-seven millions of The history of Ines de Castro offers a sub

acres, fourteen millions of men. There is ject which belongs of right to the province EXTRACTS of LETTERS from a Swiss Tra- therefore room enough for new comers. of Romance; it is even astonishing that it

VELLER in NORTH AMERICA in the The climate here is not the most agreeable, should have so long escaped the observation
Summer of 1816.

on account of the sudden changes of the air of the authoress of so many novels. The (Concluded.)

The thermometer sometimes changes in one event is as affecting as terrible, the heroine The country round Philadelphia and further afternoon 20°, from warm to cold; the great-excites the liveliest interest; history has not inland is inexpressibly beautiful; all indi- est heat which I experienced here was 950, disdained to preserve her memory; the epic cates great prosperity. Fruit whichónly wants The Winter, they say, is very rough and Muse has strewed Howers over her tomb; to be gathered, and delightful meadows cold, and lasts four or five months. The Go- and finally she inspired Lamotte, to produce. where the finest cattle graze, one sees continu- of Switzerland; one lives quite free, and exciting the highest interest.

verament and its rights are much like those a tragedy, which is never performed without ally; there are also many handsome country is not plagued about pass-ports or any thing houses. The farmer is there his own mas- else. There is no public police : duelling is ties in Mad. de Genlis’ talent: consequently

Elegance and taste are predominant qualiter; he does not want to work, because the forbidden under severe penalties; when she never strays from the busy world and the bour: whoever loves a country life and has they quarrel they settle it after the English court; it may be added, that her figures are plenty of money, does very well to come to cient laws which are partly too mild and prising under that bead the age of Louis

fashion. I see that there are many insuffi- generally all French and all modern, comSwiss arrived here without money and with give the wicked too much liberty; for these XIV. and all that succeeded him down to. out prospects--that is a misery! There

eleven years only one man has been con- the Revolution exclusively; she appears te lately arrived a ship with 500 of these un.

demned to death, and he was hanged a few write from memory rather than from imagihappy people who were not even able to pay murders, many blamed the Government for highly natural and entertaining.

days ago. Though he had committed three nation, and her works are consequently for their passage. Many of them regret their his condemnation; the clergy defended him emigration, but it is now too late. They in the pulpit, the journalists in their papers, to love ; they were the soul of chivalry, and

Women are not less sensible to glory than were sold here as servants. best paid for; girls and boys who are not sident for his release.

Children are and the Quakers sent petitions to the Pre-have frequently exercised the happiest irable to pay for their passage, serve till their

Auence over Princes, by making an advan18th and 21st year, like black slaves

Here are many French refugees; the rich tageous use of the powers of grace and

A healthy and robust man must work four or

buy themselves cstates; the poor live in beauty, to inspire them with noble sentifive years to pay for his passage, which is great misery; about 400 of them

enlisted ments, or to correct their vicious inclina80 dullars. old people cannot find any body themselves in the service of the Spaniards, tions. Mad. de Genlis has endeavoured to to take them ; so that there are now about who by flattering, promises and brilliant present in Ines an additional example of 50 of them on board the ship, who wait

with prospects enticed these poor strangers and these feelings, so honourable to her sex; but an anxious heart to know their fate. If they sent them to Mexico.

it appears to us, that she ought to have find nobody to take them for their passage

made her less imprudent than she is in the money, they are thrown into prison, where Les Tableaux de M. le Comte de Forbin, ou first part of the work. She seems to forgetthey must work with malefactors in sawing la mort de Pline l'ancien, et Ines de Castro, too suddenly the precepts and last commarble, till they have earned enough to par Mad. lu Comtesse de Gentis.

mands of a grandmother, who bestowed on pay for their passage, which may last ten The death of the elder Pliny is one of the lier the most tender cares, and resolves too or twelve years. What barbarians are the finest subjects that can possibly be chosen precipitately to abandon the peaceful abode men, the blood-suckers, who grow rich by for painting:

the idea which Horace in- of her infant years for the splendid tumult such a traffic!—There are some Germans spires of the Philosopher who stands alone of a court. All this, it is true, is managed who do so, and circulate the most tempting amidst the ruins of the world, is there and explained with much nature and delipamphlets. The last who sailed for this rcalized. Pliny the elder resembled those cacy: the character of women, and of young purpose, said, before his departure, that this great men who appeared in Rome and Italy women in particular, is every where well should be his last voyage, and if this one at the period when civilization was first in- maintained; and the spirit of the work is succeeded, he should be rich enough. The troduced into those countries by the arms undoubtedly augmented by those circumship which brought the last refugees gained and arts of Greece. Whether warriors, stances, though they perhaps tend in some at least 30,000 forins. Persons who can statesmen, or philosophers, they were all measure to diminish the interest which Ines pay for their passage and have still a little infinitely superior to the rude and ferocious should inspire. money remaining in their hands to buy a heroes of the early ages of the Republic;

Her first interview with the Prince presmall piece of land and maintain themselves but the spleodor of their rising served only sents a scene full of strong emotion and effor a while do very well; but the others are to mark the overthrow of all ibat was va- fect; and is happily conceived to establish more unhappy than they would ever be in luable in the morals and institutions of their the relations which are thenceforward to Europe. A good workman is not badly off; country.

exist between the hero and the heroine of but these increase very much, and will, in Noble and laudable as a desire to promote the history. In the absence of her guardian the end, have but little profit. Besides, a the advancement of science undoubtedly is, who had gone to Lisbon, to solicit for her a young European cannot so soon accustom yer, if Pliny had perished merely through place near the person of the Queen, Inga

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