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white draperies, sky and back-ground. There Vandyck used cold purple, lilac, blue and place them in such friendly relation to their is more joy of the heart, more dancing spirits, black draperies, to give a relative warmth to intended points of opposition, as might be and vigor of chiaro-scuro, in No. 256: more the flesh-tints in faces of this delicate fair-productive of richness and harmony. Owing airy vivacity in the masses, aud a sprightlier ness.

This counter-effect of the red in the to this they have, with a few petty excepplay of pencil in this. The countenances are turban upon the light carnations, is however tions, no relative value. Instead of being very fair, and painted in cool, clear tints of a so very slight as to be scarcely perceptible, invited by a mellow combination of skilful low sweet tone, upon which the roseate hues and the grace and beauty of this lovely por- oppositions, we are repelled by a pie-bald of the cheeks, and humid crimson of the lips, trait fix the eye, and are calculated to make discord of irreconcileable and isolated anomellow with much freshness and beauty. a long impression.

malies; a clashing of hungry, dead lights, The blue eyes of the girl leaning, in a front No. 223. “ Benevolent Ladies relieving a and sluggish, opaque shadows, without glow, view, give a livelier charm to her colouring, distressed Family, by. S. DRUMMOND." We transparency, breadth or coherence. Every and the blue is spread by a bit of bright ri. poticed, in a former communication, the thing is in spots and pulches. The yellow band on her arm-knot, which mingles with merits of this artist's whole length of C. shawl on the matron is a patch; her deep the blueish tints of the sky and distance. PHILLIPS, Esq.; and, in the invention and crimson dress is a patch; the green bed-curThe hair is a light brown, executed with a circumstances of this story, there is much tains are a patch; the child in the cradle is touch so loose and sharp, and yet so broad fine feeling and fancy. The pallid head of a patch; the red coat on the old man; the and thin, that one would think it might be the sick young man asleep in bed, and the pale clammy blue in his pantaloons, and the blown about with a breath. A bushy bit of tender anxiety expressed by his old mother, same sickly colour in the boy, are all so landscape, surrounded by felicitous combina- with a lea-cup in one hand and the other many patches. To sum up this account of tions of tint; soft, broad, negligent, touched gently laid upon his breast, watching to shreds and patches, although we are happy by the hand of taste itself, peeps upon us in the moisten his lips in the intervals of his slum- to repeat that the selection of the subject, middle distance. Bebind the girls and their bers, are sufficient to stanıp a value upon and the invention of the incidents, do feathered captive, the trunk of a tree rises, this performance. The young lady cutting honor to the head and heart of the arenriched with foliage and the wanton tendrils a loaf for a meagre hollow-eyed little buy; tist; and that the drawing, grouping, exof a vine, whose broad leaves of golden yel- the greedy action of whose hands and raven- pression and characters, in all that does not low brighten, in vivid opposition to the ous gestures, show that he is ready to tear it depend upon the colouring, manifest no commasses of a

summer sky. In from her, is another affecting and well told inon skill, and are deserving of warm combreadth, feshiness, lovely colouring and incident. The gratitude of the poor old fa. mendation, yet, in whatever relates to the tasteful handling, there is nothing to be ther, whose eyes and clasped 'hands are colouring, we are under the painful necessity wished for in this fine specimen; but the raised in thanksgiving to heaven, is also of observing that it is unworthy of his gesentiment is not so well defined as in No. 256 ; expressed with much truth and feeling. The nius, and rank as an associate of the acadeit is neither a joy for the acquisition of the group with the matron and her daughter my. Mr. Drummond has also several other red-breast, nor a concern for its captivity, giving money and the bible to the kneeling pictures in the Exhibition, wbich evince his The expression is dugue, and wherever that wife of the sick son, is cleverly disposed, already invention and mastery of hand; but is the case, however admirable the execution though the expression is not so strongly in their colouring, partake, in different de. may be, the impressions upon the spectator marked as in the figures already noticed. grees, of the chilling, discords which dismust be vague also. Nevertheless, if we The little innocent asleep in the cradle is higure this pathetic subject. The prevalence consider them simply as portraits, which designed with spirit. The various accessa- of sickly blueish draperies in his principal have no incidental character to sustain, these ries in the apartment are introduced in a masses of light, as in the portraits of Mrs. heads are in an exquisite taste. The artist good taste, and with a correct attention to Brooks and her children, is one of his most had a great difficulty to encounter, in avoid-relative propriety; and as far as the choice prominent errors or neglects. In that picture ing unpleasant lines and angles, in the meet- of subject, invention, drawing, characters there is a pleasing disposition in the lady's ing of three hands and arms, about the and expression, this composition is highly figure, and a graceful spirit in the turn of Robin. No degree of skill could, perhaps, creditable to the artist's humanity and pro- her head; but she is in a dull, leaden, blueish wholly overcome this difficulty. Mr. Phillips fessional abilities. There are genuine strokes dress, with the contrast of an unwashed curhas exerted his powers, and we wish that we of nature in it, which come home to the tain of dingy yellow above her head, as if could compliment him upon an entire vic. heart and lay a-strong hold on our kindlier to render the chilling, heavy effect of her tory. But the eye is still sensible of some sympathies. As an excitement to charity, drapery, more offensive. No. 293, the whole constraint and complexity, which is more it is a practical act of virtue, which must length portrait of a child embracing her obvious, as it occurs in the centre of this very work good by example. We bear this testi-doll, is designed with much playful grace, attractive picture.

mony to Mr. Drummond's benevolent con- and an elegance of fancy, which would do No. 266. “ A whole length of a Boy, a ception and genius with sincere pleasure; credit to the pencil of any British Artist; native of New Guinea,is not a favorable but when we have done this, we are con- but still this lively little baggage is too coldly subject for colouring, but Mr. Phillips has cerned to add our fear that not one tenth of and carelessly coloured; and is oppressed by a made it a picture of much merit and interest. its merits will ever be looked into, on ac- weight of greasy blue tinis, in the landscape. In No. 104., a three-quarter length por-count of its cold repulsive colouring and total If the former works of this artist did not trait of Lady Ridley, he has displayed a want of even any approach to union. It would warrant a high opinion of his powers, we large share of tasteful feeling. The draw. be an abuse of words to say that the tints should have passed by his pictures in silence; ing, attitude and accessaries, are worthy of are distributed or massed. They are scat- but we have received too mucii pleasure from his pencil. The execution is firm and sweet, tered and broken, like the party-coloured his various compositions to abandon him and the whole picture marked by his un- bits upon a thrifty housewife's quilt, who now to the freaks of his caprice; the errors or alterable love of truth. The tone of the head has made up her bed-covering from a collec- neglects of his practice. His battle of Wateris clear and mellow; but not quite so rich tion of shreds and cuttings out of the trash-loo, last year, contained more bold thinking, as the tone of the heads in No. 277. The bags of every good woinan in the parish. clever drawing and composition, although oppositions of colour are complex, and not so They appear as a sort of chance-medley rather too coldly coloured, than some fifty of effective. Although the delicate fairness of assemblage thrown in, with little if any re- the pictures then in the rooms. In 810, he the flesh is contrasted by the cool green dra- lation to the colours around them. Many had one of the best historical compositions in peries; that aid is checked by the quantity of the principal lights offend the eye by the British Institution—"The commission of of red ant yellowish tints on the turban and watry chilling colours. A dull greasy blue Diego Leiva and Camillo de la Torre to seother parts. The latter certainly mellow the is very conspicuous in the draperies. The cure the young Princess of Mantua and red on the cheek; but they also form a warm brightest hues are placed where they are Montserrat.”- That fine picture is thus decontrast with the light carnations of the face, cut off from support. They are left without servedly recorded in a critical publication of which lose some of their value by the com- a sufficiency of intermediate auxiliaries or that day." The costume is picturesque, and parison, and appear proportionally cold. shadowy assimilations to subside upon, and although the green, crimson, orange and

w.

of England, as we have shewed, are tra- and countries. It is an eternal truth, that a course ofinquiry,and to employ himself upon duced, rendered objects of suspicion, and divided people can neither acquire liberty, much laborious calculation. His son bas jealousy; and held up by malignant infer- nor retain that inestimable blessing. They very properly favoured the public with four ence, to their husbands, fathers, brothers, must be either amicably joined in the bonds volumes of his revered father's discourses and lovers, as the most depraved and im- of a common interest, by nature, reason, and and some other of his erudite performances, modest of their sex in Europe. The men the dictales of huinanity and religion ; or but one thing remains for filial duty to disof England are blackened and stigmatised by an over-ruling Power, in fetters of an op. charge, and he is hereby respectfully called to the people of Scotland, Ireland, and the posite kind. An empire composed of differ- upon to remember that time is passiog away whole world, as dolts, dupes, blockheads, bulent nations requires the pen and voice of and that many are hastening to the grave, lies, and by palpable inference, cowards; the mild, persuasive Eloquence, to charm away who would be glad to contribute their assismost dishonest, base and bloody-minded their prejudices and melt them into one peo-tance in enriching a memoir which, properly people in Christendom. The Irish, in their ple. The unhappy divisions of the several executed, cannot fail to be one of the most turn, are calumniated and rendered objects states, which composed the commonwealth, valuable in the English language. of public odium to England and Scotland, as overthrew the liberty of Rome; and finally May 9, 1817. a people, in a good natured way, ready to lend subverted the empire. Those incendiaries a hand to any villany or atrocity through an who would excite popular divisioas are pub PROGRESS OF THE ARTS AND incoherence in their understandings, a want lic enemies. The British Writer, who can

SCIENCES, of virtue in their heads. The ScotCH, not- subdue a local prejudice or national dislike,

Tin Mines. The simplest events in dowithstanding the clearness of their

heads, in the breasts of Englishmen, Irishmen, and mestic economy are often conducive to gehave come in for their full share or defama- Scotchmen, is the true friend to his country; neral welfare and internal emolument. of tion with the Irish and English, as equally and will merit more than a statue of gold; this nature is a recent discovery, that the dangerous, equally ready for any villany or the gratitude of the latest posterity. These Coal Gas, though corrosive of copper, has atrocity, whenever the selfish depravity of are the victories which are to our taste, but yet no mordent effect upon Tin. The result their impulses" puts them in the way of we have the will only without the power. may be beneficial to our Cornish Mines of a profitable robbery, assassination, or any other These are the glories of which a friend to the latter article. heinous crime. In this latter concluding re-humanity, a man of real genius, might well

The system by which Cottons are printed capitulation of the parts only to which we be proud. Our voice is weak, and our hope in varied colours, has been applied by Mr. have hitherto adverted, we are obliged, as humble, but we shall repeat, again and again, W. Savage to the colouring of Prints in imi. of their words and malignant inferences, with sity, and introduces tranquillity and affection other words, the print both in outline

and a reference to the preceding extracts and among his countrymen, does more for the colour is worked off by successive applicareasoning, in this and our two former let- public security, than a general who wins a tions of wooden blocks cut and tinted in a ters; and as their essays are before the pub- dozen bloody battles, fills a country with wi- manner so progressive as to produce the lic, every man who sets

a value upon the dows and orphans, and conquers a kingdom, effect required. Our fair readers will at once morals of his family, can form his judgment in a distant part of the world.

see that this idea has partly been practised by their own words, by the letter and the spi

A New EXAMINER.

in the progressive application of colour, rit of their whole publication. A full and

through the vacancies cut in plates of copimpartial comprehension of their work, in

BISHOP HORSLEY.

per, so as to produce ornamental Aowers on parts and as a whole, in its direct and ulti

To the Editor of the Literary Gazette. muslin and tiffany trimmings. mate tendency to injure public manners Sir,-Allow me through the medium of Steam Boats. Since the approach of and morals, can easily

be acquired by a com- your excellent journal, which appears to be a summer has put all our Steam Boats in moparison of its letter and spirit, which in many proper vehicle for eliciting literary information for Margate and the other marine wastriking passages will be found to preserve, tion, to enquire whether there is any likeli- tering places, it has been proposed to obviin appearance, a guarded separation, al. hood that the world will be favoured with an ate all danger of explosion, and to encourage though they work together in the ininds of ample memoir and correspondence of the the timid, by substituting the mechanical the reader. The words “ On good nature," late learned Bishop Horsler ! It is truly to action of hydraulics for the impulse pro prefixed as a litle to one of their essays

, be lamented that in this age of Biography, duced by steam. It is true that the first were made use of to introduce their false when so many insignificant characters are impulse given by the latter mode is not so and infamous attack upon the Irish and eulogised with as much pump and parade as rapid;

but all mechanists know the mode of Scotch; so in their scoffing attacks upon re- if they had been persons of the first distinc- multiplying power and increasing, rapidity; vealed religion, and their impious mockery tion in science, eight years should have pass- so that the only objection can be the in, of the Deity, which require a distinct expo- ed away without any detailed account of one creased expense of machinery, which would sure, the letter and spirit will be found to of the brightest ornaments the English be saved in fuel in a few seasons. be as cautiously set at a seeming distance. Church ever enjoyed. The excellence of the

ANTEDILUVIAN DISCOVERIES.-It has been When the benevolent mind of Addison Bishop of St. A saph was not confined to his suggested lately by Mr. Musher, in conse forewarned the people, in his essays, that, peculiar profession, for it is well known that quence of analysing some native Iron disif ever the liberty of England should be de- he was a mathematician of the first rank, covered in Brasil, that such specimens are stroyed, it must be by their own party ani- and a scholar of almost universal knowledge. actually the remains of Antediluvian Metalmosities and national divisions, he little His writings will ever speak his praise, and lurgy, and not resulting from the chemistry foresaw that, in another century, English the journals of parliament exhibit ample of nature. This idea struck him from its Writers would be found, under the pretext proois of his diligence as a member of the resemblance to the residuum so often found of publishing a series of similar papers,” to House of Peers, and of his powers as an ora- in blast furnaces; particularly as similar make a mockery of the Scriptures; and blow tor of the most commanding eloquence. In masses are often found where an ore of iron into a flame all those fatal prejudices and private life he was truly amiable, and I can is abundant on the surface, perhaps the national divisions, against which, as the most cheerfully bear testimony to the suavity scoria of former works ! grave of freedom, he so earnestly admonish- of his manners, and the liberality of his dised his country. Yet all the anti-social male position. He held a very extended corresvolence and sneering contempt for revealed pondence with learned men abroad and at

Salisbury, 27th May, 1819. religion, in the Round Table, is set forward lome, upon all subjects of literary impor. Mr. Editor,-No problem has more en under the mask of philanthropy. Our stream tance, and he was to my knowledge always gaged the attention, puzzled the hrains, and of thinking is not muddied by the petty punctual in answering any letters that he baffled the efforts of Mathematicians and interests or Auctuating maxims of parties in received, though frequently he was called Mechanical Men, for these two thousand or out of power. We speak in the spirit of upon to give his opinion upon compositions years past, than the celebrated problem of history, and our reasoning applies to all ages which obliged him to enter into an elaborate a Perpetual Motion, I hnd in a late dum.

PERPETUAL NOTION.

ber of your valuable Literary Gazette, that Lov'd, fast Alesul-on whose gentle heart

keeping: a deficiency of taste, and of the * a Monsieur Louis, of Valence, has con. Heaven has abandant poard its kits divine qualities that inspire love: they will be siructed a machine that is said to solve, as An, why did tate thy mond tous worth imparti careless in everything. The guíof eighfar as may be reasonably expected, the no

Yet cast my lot so far from table problern of perpetual moliun." - Vow

teen, who desires pof 10 please, will be a Sit, a gentleman of any acquaintance has

Thou com'st, sweet Spring !, but I upbraid no slut and a shrew at twenty tive. Pay

more, poreded in discovery to at least an equal

attention, young med, to this sign; it extent with this persevering, and ingeniou In vain, alas' thou wouldse may peace restore,

For ibou a sympathetic look dost wear!

nerer yet was known to deceive," Huse fureigner: his machine will regulariy and Io vaia thou seem'st to pity my despair.

bands, as well as lovers, are gratified and ur nierruptedly proceed, without the inter

delighted in seeing their partners handportion of any external cause : all supplies with liogering glance, on yonder rasset plain

somely adorned, and I anı well convinced, from foreign or external causes being, of Thou still appear'ut reinctantly to shae : course, excluled in a perpetual motion, and. Perhaps thou may'u lameat the fasthlut swaa, that many a beart, now roving in quest of thus tas, all well. One sad obstacle how Whom love and mutual truth bad chusen mine. vaniely, might have been delawed in wille ever arises, and, it is thought, ever must

ing capuriyat bome, by the silken chalas anse to prevent the completion of the ub. But domfell discord, and the din of arms ject in view; I allude to the impossibility o

Far off have se s'd, and bone my love away moral duties of every married woman,

of personal decoration. It is one of the bosing in this world materials of an impe.

Alike we fall, in prime of nature's charms, nisbatle tature. Pray, Mr. Editor, will you

To glory one--and one to griel a prey!

always to appear well dressed in the preor any correspondent inform me (and the so opes the lily to the solar beam

sence of her busband To ettect this, Information inay be acceptable as well to

expensiveness of ature is by no means

Her silver ball, rofeut its warmth to woo; utbers as myseit) what reward is held up to Yet droop dejected ere its siting glearn,

requnite. The simplest robe u av evince the vag'agres of the man, who fancies be And in the blesung meets affliction too!

the wearer's taste as pobly as the most can with Pythagoras exclain ela, pya!

gorgeous brocade. With respect to reignand also if any reward has been claimed and

MORNING.

ing fashions, it must never be considered, allowed tur laudatle approaches towards the Now dewy Nature starts from her repose--

that solution of this fand problem.

Already bus ibe bee her task begun,
I am, Sur, your obedient servant,

And Flora's image upon earth, the rose, " One form of dress prescrib'd can rust with
A ACILIMLDES, Jun.
Bursis iniu likeauty with the tuftiiug sua.

Oor ongbtene seines when wealth and art cum
A thonund zephyrs now are bovering there,
Witba is inviable to earthly nie,

To make the finished piece remplately fine,
POETRY
To cat ta and wat ber odoun through the air,

When least adornd, another stalı our tartı,

As streaming from her lovely breast thry nise. And, rachata nalive beauties, was ta sutasin LINES, by the late Cot'NTES B

In some are sucho fraisuusa tær bruni, * Primavera' gioventu dell'anno." CLARINI. Fair flowers leu lovely, haodmaids to their that in act dirasa they we sure to w suts.

Quern,

1 hari perte i torma ali tereign aits despese Thea com'et, sweet Spring' but com't not now l'aclone their eyes and weep the dew away,

And gema bat borrow alre from the r...** the same

And lift tbeu leads late drospingo at the green, / The Batural tigure of a woman n of the A. late I uw thee Winter's frowns remove, And sweetty welcome the approach od day. fint importante i determining the slvie Whre sportive bours all jocund with thee carne, And drooping nature wak d to hide and more. What vaned strains are gathering in the sky

of her dress. What sight, fue ustale Wbra charm'd by thee, my rural pipe I sought,

The pisu glumans wlustle and the iark's shrill can be more propensletves than that of a

short, thick, broad-shoulder d. fat tenale And did the vallies all thy prases brar, The rood's discordant anewer to the cry Won from the tuneful tribe well plud, I

to a spenser! - It has been well oberted, Of nuiny nestlingo helpless and alone.

too, that " short wonra destroy their Soune aivan notes the learly dale to cheer. Sow A rating far, the fall and mellov pote'

*ymetry, and enx umbes their harus

01 piping biack bard, peredad npon the thorn, by all redundanı y of onament i aud W na lastning my mphas adornd my flowing hair And twiftening straim from many a luuetul, that " a bulle woman, frattered and turn

With garianda gav tlaat with thy blumea glow d. throat, fase attas that to promne tabirssona'd treat and

belowed, looks like a qurea of the Bac. Max in the concert of the merry morn. hir,

tam inobe, and we dare et approach ter, But never fruit or lasting sweets bestow'd') And ol' what eye could case on such a scene, for frar of rustling ter teatters

And casting view the laule thare danplay d. Se have my fates theat flattering sales with Her rainbow dots, lat 16*t prevailing ****,

los is the substance of wlore b dresses Arun,

ase composed unworthy of notke. Mak

( taste in the night, and meluw in the shadeTaula gratle once they ket'd serene and

ing due allowance for the raw, that Woods slowly waving to the cented pale, which will display, or sulten, uie (uuluur 4. it the sun, that gila a joy fal dawn,

And imaged, wsving in the stream below, of the form, with most pospreman meen brooding clouds obscure bus noon-tide Flores calin by browsing ie the ouwelip dale, rtiert, should alwave the perferred. ibe

With freers brighteard by the malsa gew.

Homan ladies bad their pulus listadas, Thor exon 'st, sweet Spring --but bringest not Halenata, May 16, 1817

and their linca webula -- boru so the as The precious gifta ere now profanety shed;

ON LASIE IS FEMALE DRESY to a quire the games -- -; a.nl, ir in A tramadol m.2014, kay mith, aneb lilcity

Comiuded from our last lumber.) the transparrut asuslu, to tbe substant al but rather thrse at thy approacta are the d.

Personal neatness may alınost be claus sulk, the merino and kerseylere, ou

ed with the carvinai virtues. It was as variety of feature is almost whaste. Ilus, Surn Winter's fiests have far less cruel been. Jobservation of Lavater's, that persons ha wbude the ph formed manden may be

Though bong theu ngors whitend o'er the bitually attentive to dress, display the atbrwed to ti net in posames, the more ale were my horko beneath the sewling seeme, same regulanly in their domestic affans. matured and partly fe inale shound adopt Asi beak my cottage-ared thea ta bore! Young women,' says be, " w bo neglect a labru breiter suled to ber sur, be

ibeir loubelle, and 'maninst litibe con agure, and ber the of life. Brabe blee'd the tart, the social board appear's cern about dress, indicale ma thus very With reais piety, and with joy supplar d.

I barte u both perhaps, mare d!!.. T* i** Aleus every sadness cheerd, particular, a disregard of order, a mund cult of choice, or more deiusne to the

Not thea formar is spring we must divide! bat ill adapted to the details of bous wearer, than coloan; and quihuing more

seen

offensive to the educated eye, than co-manner, this head proves that facility, the above, and gives additional clearness and lours ill-choseu, ill-adapted, or ill-com- firmness of a draftsman, and taste, may solidity to this admirable portrait.

No. 199. Aourish together. Its pure and unaffected bined.

« Portrait of W. Q. Diek," “ Let the fair nymph, in whose pluinp cheeks is spirit opposes a consoling contrast to those not quite a half figure. Mr. Phillips has

loose and undefined scumiblings, which are painted this gentleman in a loose Vandyke A constant blush, be clad in cheerful green;

obtruded upon the public, as specimens of a drapery of a warm shadowy purple, wiih a In such a dress the sportive sea-nymphs go ;

inasterly execution. Although unlike the style broad linen neck-band turned over and tied So in their grassy bed fresh roses blow."

of Titian or Reynolds, and evidently a style with tasselled lace. The action is graceful In has been remarked, however, that formed, altogether, upon a close study of and spirited; the person seen in profile; the

nature, it possesses, with its own distinct face turned round in a full three-quarter grass-green, though a colour exceedingly character, a depth of colour equal to that in view, as if addressing the Spectator; the pleasing and refreshing itself, jaundices the portraits of the former, with much of near arm buried in the loose folds of his the pale woman to such a degree, as to the warm feeling of the latter. But Mr. robe, and the other raised, holding the draexcite little other sensation but compas- Phillips's own fine taste, his chaste feeling, pery with one finger, gently pointing as if to sion in the beholder.

and his jealous attachment to simplicity and mark the particulars of his reasoning. The Maids grown pale with sickness or

truth, are its essential beauties. Its style is mild inflection of the brow is that of a person despair,

as original as that of the Countess of Cassilis, conversing. The expression is altogether in The sable's mournful dye should chuse to wear;

by Mr. Owen, or of Anucreon Moore's por- accord. The head is finely drawn; the penSo the pale moon still shines with purest light,'trait, and that of Ellis, by SHEE.. This ori- çiling soft and large; the carnations clear, Cloath'd in the dusky mantle of the night.”

ginality is valuable, not only for its merits, inclined to sanguine; and forming, with the

but because it is an additional safeguard to linen, a bold light in perfect union with the Ladies of a pale complexion, I con- the British School, from the nice otomanner purplish shade of the dress. The fragment ceive, should seldom, if ever, wear a dress which corrupted the Schools of Italy, and to of a ruined building wrapt in deep obscurity; of an entire colour. Their white drapery, which all schools are prone. We repeat this and the louring solemnity of a dark cold sky, at least, might be relieved, and animated, observation, with a particular stress, at this with ruddy gleams breaking through the by ribbons, flowers, &c. of delicate tints; moment, from a conviction that it is neces- grey clouds on the horizon, throw a sentisuch as light pink, or blossom-colour. sary. The rage for copying the style of ment into the accessaries, and give an effect On the other hand,

some one master of celebrity, must produce of grandeur to the whole. Mr. Phillips has

an abandı nmnent of nature; a mistake of the also, No. 163, nearly a whole length portrait " The lass, whose skin is like the hazel brown; surface for the principles;' and a disgusting of J. Brookes, Esq. “ painted by desire of the With brighter yellow should o'ercome her own!" sameness of manner, in the majority of those, Students of Anatomy under his tuition."

She may even, without fear of offence, who, even with the best advantages, are bred This is a capital specimen of truth. The atassume the orange, the scarlet, the coque-l in the same school. As the population of a titude, expression, accessaries, light and licot, the flame-colour, or the deep great capital, like London, is principally kept shadow, are in a pure style. But we conrose; either of which will heighten the up by provincial settlers, so an original cha-ceive that the general effect would, perhaps, animated hue of her complexion, and im- racter in a School of Painters, is, perhaps, be more spirited if a greater portion of cold part a more dazzling lustre to her eye.

best maintained by the intermixture of or cool-colours had been introduced. The It is not within the province of an old young and able artists from a distance, who grey tints in the back ground, the glass jar,

have formed an independent style of think- and other accessaries, with the small bit of man, Mr. Editor, to descend into the ing and painting before their arrival

. Such green cloth on the table, are not suficient minutiæ of female attire, to prescribe the artists prevent the students from all running to give value to so large a preponderance of cut of a robe, the fall of a mantle, or the after one model, and bring a treasure into warm assimilations. The introduction of shape of a bomet. These points may

the school for that which they receive from the small bit of green cloth indicates that the

it. very safely be left to a consultation be- other distinguished provincials, besides Mr. colour; bui we cannot help thinking that so

Chantry, Mulready, Shee, and many Artist sought a balance or opposition of tween the lady and her dress-maker; the Phillips, are instances of this original power. scanty a morsel of that tint is of small weight cultivated taste of the former regulating There is a gentle facility in the execution of in the scale. We are aware that Chastity in and checking the meretricious fancy of this portrait, which shows that the painter Ait is his idol; yet Chastity may smile and the latter. In the hope that the hints did not study to niake the mere mode, or sparkle without losing its innocent attracwhich I have offered may prove of some boldness, of his handling, the first attraction tions. We cannot resist a conviction that utility,

to the eye of a spectator. The penciling is upon the judicious use of the cool or cold I remain, &c. SENEX.

not so distinct as that in his never-to-be-colours, depends much of the brilliant effect forgotten portrait of Mr. Hatchet, last year. and vivacity of a portrait. Take away the

It is more soft and large, and the effect of cold stormy back-ground from the portrait of FINE ARTS.

sharpness is produced without any over- Mr. Quinten Dick, and you take away half

charge of colour, or display of touch; all the life from that speaking picture. This REVIEW OF PAINTINGS the features are correctly drawn, and deter- Artist has also Nos. 256, 277, 266, and 104,

mined with masterly precision. There is in the Exhibition. In No. 256, “ Muy Ella, No. 73. Portrait of T. Murrock, Esq.” but one mass of light, which is composed in with ter gude grey Katte," the little Brunette by 'T. Phillips, R. A.: a head in a three-a rich, vigorous breadth, by the flesh, cravat is seated in a playful posture, pressing her quarter view, of a complexion originally san- and top of a yellow waistcoat. This single- favorite to her bosom. The light of a smile guine, embrowned by travel. The tone of ness in the chiaro-scuro, produces the im- sparkles in her countenance, and the exthe flesh is low and mellow. The combina- posing unity in the picture. The light is pression is full of exquisite simplicity. Her tion of breadth and detail, in the carnations diffused and mellowed, below, by some bright forehead is shaded by chesnut curls; the and shadows, is so perfect, and the reflections sharp touches on the buttons; which, with Aesh tints are warın; the cheeks tinged with are so admirably inanaged, that, as in na- the delicate sharpness in the folds of the ruddy health ; the shadows of a clear olive; ture, the light and shadow, and all the forms, cravat, gives a spirit to the subdued move and the innocent archness of Correggio animerge into one. We are instantly struck ment of hand in finishing the flesh. The mates her whole figure. The back-ground is by this singleness of object, and the union is next subordinate mass is composed by the close and dark, excepting one picturesque so entire, that it is only on a near inspection upper part of the dark purplish coat, united break, and the light is thrown in broad the parts admit of a separate examination with some faint dun reflections ou a dark, bright masses upon her person. To those, who, in their imitation of the indistinct piece of carving or furniture be

No. 277. “ Portraits of two young girls, tasteful fascinations of Reynolds, cover the hind. A strong accidental shadow across with a Red-breast;” is of a different characwalls with pictures in a spongy or woolly the arm and breast concentrates the light ter. The light is broadly diffused on the

IN THE EXHIBITION AT SOMERSET-HOUSE.

azure

white draperies, sky and back-ground. There Vandyck used cold purple, lilac, blue and place them in such friendly relation to their is more joy of the heart, more dancing spirits, black draperies, to give a relative warmth to intended points of opposition, as might be and vigor of chiaro-scuro, in No. 256: more the flesh-tints in faces of this delicate fair- productive of richness and harmony. Owing airy vivacity in the masses, and a sprightlier ness. This counter-effect of the red in the to this they have, with a few petty excepplay of pencil in this. The countenances are turban upon the light carnations, is however tions, no relative value. Instead of being very fair, and painted in cool, clear tints of a so very slight as to be scarcely perceptible, invited by a mellow combination of skilful low sweet tone, upon which the roseate hues and the grace and beauty of this lovely por- oppositions, we are repelled by a pie-bald of the cheeks, and humid crimson of the lips, trait fix the eye, and are calculated to make discord of irreconcileable and isolated anomellow with much freshness and beauty. a long impression.

malies; a clashing of hungry, dead lights, The blue eyes of the girl leaning, in a front No. 223. “ Benevolent Ladies relieving a and sluggish, opaque shadows, without glow, view, give a livelier charm to her colouring, distressed Family, by S. DRUMMOND.” We transparency, breadth or coherence. Every and the blue is spread by a bit of bright ri. noticed, in a former communication, the thing is in spots and putches. The yellow band on her arm-knot, which mingles with merits of this artist's whole length of C. shawl on the matron is a patch; her deep the blueish tints of the sky and distance. PAILLIPS, Esq.; and, in the invention and crimson dress is a patch; the green bed-curThe hair is a light brown, executed with a circumstances of this story, there is much tains are a patch; the child in the cradle is touch so loose and sharp, and yet so broad fine feeling and fancy. The pallid head of a patch; the red coat on the old man; the and thin, that one would think it might be the sick young man asleep in bed, and the pale clammy blue in his pantaloons, and the blown about with a breath. A bushy bit of tender anxiety expressed by his old mother, same sickly colour in the boy, are all so landscape, surrounded by felicitous combina- with a lea-cup in one hand and the other many patches. To sum up this account of tions of tint; soft, broad, negligent, touched gently laid upon his breast, watching to shreds and patches, although we are happy by the hand of taste itself, peeps upon us in the noisten his lips in the intervals of his slum- to repeat that the selection of the subject, middle distance. Bebind the girls and their bers, are sufficient to stamp a value upon and the invention of the incidents, do feathered captive, the trunk of a tree rises, this performance. The young lady cutting honor to the head and heart of the arenriched with foliage and the wanton tendrils a loaf for a meagre hollow-eyed little buy; tist; and that the drawing, grouping, exof a vine, whose broad leaves of golden yel- the greedy action of whose hands and raven- pression and characters, in all that does not low brighten, in vivid opposition to the ous gestures, show that he is ready to tear it depend upon the colouring, manifest no com

masses of a summer sky. In from her, is another affecting and well told mon skill, and are deserving of warm combreadth, feshiness, lovely colouring and incident. The gratitude of the poor old fa. mendation, yet, in whatever relates to the tasteful handling, there is nothing to be ther, whose eyes and clasped hands are colouring, we are under the painful necessity wished for in this fine specimen; but the raised in thanksgiving to heaven, is also of observing that it is unworthy of his gesentiment is not so well defined as in No. 256 ; expressed with much truth and feeling. The nius, and rank as an associate of the acadeit is neither a joy for the acquisition of the group with the matron and her daughter my. Mr. Drummond has also several other red-breast, nor a concern for its captivity. giving money and the bible to the kneeling pictures in the Exhibition, wbich evince his The expression is dague, and wherever that wife of the sick son, is cleverly disposed, al- ready invention and mastery of hand; but is the case, however admirable the execution though the expression is not so strongly in their colouring, partake, in different de. may be, the impressions upon the spectator marked as in the figures already noticed. grees, of the chilling, discords which dismust be vagué also. Nevertheless, if we The little innocent asleep in the cradle is figure this pathetic subject. The prevalence consider them simply as portraits, which designed with spirit. The various accessa- of sickly blueish draperies in his principal have no incidental character to sustain, these ries in the apartment are introduced in a masses of light, as in the portraits of Mrs. heads are in an exquisite taste. The artist good taste, and with a correct attention to Brooks and her children, is one of his most had a great difficulty to encounter, in avoid-frelative propriety; and as far as the choice prominent errors or neglects. In that picture ing unpleasant lines and angles, in the meet- of subject, invention, drawing, characters there is a pleasing disposition in the lady's ing of three hands and arms, about the and expression, this composition is highly figure, and a graceful spirit in the turn of Robin. No degree of skill could, perhaps, creditable to the artist's humanity and pro- her head; but she is in a dull, leaden, blueish wholly overcome this difficulty. Mr. Phillips fessional abilities. There are genuine strokes dress, with the contrast of an unwashed curhas exerted his powers, and we wish that we of nature in it, which come home to the tain of dingy yellow above her head, as if could compliment him upon an entire vic. heart and lay a-strong hold on our kindlier to render the chilling, heavy effect of her tory. But the eye is still sensible of some sympathies. As an excitement to charity, drapery, more offensive. No. 293, the wholeconstraint and complexity, which is more it is a practical act of virtue, which must length portrait of a child embracing her obvious, as it occurs in the centre of this very work good by example. We bear this testi- doll, is designed with much playful grace, attractive picture.

mony to Mr. Drummond's benevolent con- and an elegance of fancy, which would do No. 266. “ A whole length of a Boy, a ception and genius with sincere pleasure; credit to the pencil of any British Artist; native of New Guinea,is not a favorable but when we have done this, we are con- but still this lively little baggage is too coldly subject for colouring, but Mr. Phillips has cerned to add our fear that not one tenth of and carelessly coloured; and is oppressed by a made it a picture of much merit and interest. its merits will ever be looked into, on ac- weight of greasy blue tints, in the landscape. In No. 104., a three-quarter length por- count of its cold repulsive colouring and total If the former works of this artist did not trait of Lady Ridley, he has displayed a wunt of even any approach to union. It would warrant a high opinion of his powers, we large share of tasteful feeling. The draw. be an abuse of words to say that the tints should have passed by his pictures in silence; ing, attitude and accessaries, are worthy of are distributed or massed. They are scat- but we have received too mucii pleasure from his pencil. The execution is firm and sweet, tered and broken, like the party-coloured his various compositions to abandon him and the whole picture marked by his un- bits upon a thrifty housewife's quilt, who now to the freaks of his caprice; the errors or alterable love of truth. The tone of the head has made up her bed-covering from a collec- neglects of his practice. His battle of Wateris clear and mellow; but not quite so rich tion of shreds and cuttings out of the trash-loo, last year, contained more bold thinking, 25 the tone of the heads in No. 277. The bags of every good woman in the parish. clever drawing and composition, although oppositions of colour are complex, and not so They appear as a sort of chance-medley rather too coldly coloured, than some fifty of effective. Although the delicate fairness of assemblage thrown in, with little if any re- the pictures then in the rooms. In .810, he the flesh is contrasted by the cool green dra-lation to the colours around them. Many had one of the best historical compositions in peries; that aid is checked by the quantity of the principal lights offend the eye by the British Institution-" The commission of of red and yellowish tints on the turban and watry chilling colours. A dull greasy blue Diego Leiva and Camillo de la Torre to seother parts. The latter certainly mellow the is very conspicuous in the draperies. The cure the young Princess of Jantua and red on the cheek; but they also form a warm brightest hues are placed where they are Montserrat.”- That fine picture is thus decontrast with the light carnations of the face, cut off from support. They are left without servedly recorded in a critical publica:ion of which lose some of their value by the com- a sufficiency of intermediate auxiliaries or that day. "The costuine is picturesque, and parison, and appear proportionally cold. shadowy assimilations to subside upon, and although the green, crimson, orange and

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