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liament, therefore I feel roused to a degree of eight syllable -Upon the above passage, your Correspondent has inverse; and as for old English, it has become quite indis- sinuated a heinous charge against her son Richard Brinspensable, ever since the battle of Trafalgar.” Thus, Sir, ley Sheridan, namely that of having, defrauded his deyou see, the conclusions follow each other as naturally as ceased mother of the fame due to this finished comedy, by the quotient produced from multiplying by the shovel and suppressing the manuscript, and pilfering from it the tongs, and dividing by the poker. Of course the old idea basis or materials of bis comedy of the Rivals! I give here is entirely exploded, that arts flourish most when arms the words of this infamous accusation—“What" is "more have ceased.

probable than that Mr. Sheridan, who certainly has been But the mischief, which, according to this new doctrine, esteemed not scrupulously nice respecting such subjects, we must expect, is, that, now we are no longer at war, should take advantage of a manuscript of this description our poetry will dwindle once more into mere Queen existing in the family, to raise himself a reputation as a Anneism ; that Lord Byron will forthwith put his pen upon dramatic writer, without the labor and anxiety of being the peace establishment, and Walter Scott himself turn one ?"--Now, Sir, I shall first notice that Dr. Watkins, who, Pastoral Master-General to the department of rills and in his interesting work, has certainly manifested no bias in roses. Nay, the great Review, too, must partake of the favor of the late Mr. Sheridao, does not hint any such odisoft infection; and even now, the symptoms are apparent; ous charge against him; and I shall shew by a few facts that ivasmuch as that very work, which, animated of course by the whole known chain of circumstances and probabilities the war, had formerly eulogized Pope with such eloquent are against the insinuated accusation of your correspondent. enthusiasm, has already, since the piping times of peace, Iu the beginning of 1762, Richard Brinsley Sheridan was lowered its lofty phraseology, and talked of bis powers sent to school at Harrow, where he remained until his with tameness and indifference.

eighteenth year, which was in 1769. During that time I am, Sir, your obedient servant, COLLATOR. he was at a distance from bis parents. In September

1764, they took his elder brother and his sister with them SHERIDAN VINDICATED.

to France and settled at Blois. Within less than two To the Editor of the Literary Gazette. years after her arrival there, she wrote the "finished Sir, I read with much pleasure in your first num- comedy," mentioned by your correspondept, called " A ber, your just condemnation of a recent attempt to exalt Trip to Bath ;” and the two last volumes of Sidney the character of the Writers of Scotland, by a grave asser- Biddulph. This fact is proved by her husband, who in. tion in the Edinburgh Review that “the Writers, who a letter from Blois to Mr. Samuel White of Dublin, in adomed the beginning of the last century, have been August 1766, says, she wrote them "since our arrival eclipsed by the Writers of our own time.” I admire the here." Thus the “ finished comedy" was written in rich imagination of Scott, the tender pathos of Camp. France, while her son Brinsley was in England ; and bell, the fine fancy and feeling of Byron and Moore, and when he was only in his fifteenth year. In that same the devotional fervor and chaste flights of Montgomery, letter, her husband states I am reduced to my last without losing my relish for the works of Dryden, Pope, Louis," and adds, “I must conjure you by all that is Addison, Parnel, Gay, Swift, and their select contempo- sacred in friendship, to raise a hundred pounds for me as raries. I consider every attempt to rob our ancestors of speedily as possible, and convey it to W. Whately, Esq. their fame, as an attempt to rob our common country, Banker in London, for my use.” In the midst of his distress, which is entitled to the sum total of all our glory in arts in a strange country, before he received the requested and arms.

A sentiment in your last paper fully ex- loan, Mrs. Sheridan died almost suddenly, on the 26th of presses mine--"We would divide our own time from September 1766 : and as already noticed, her son R. the past, not to overturn the monuments consecrated to Brinsley did not join his father's family until three years the dead, but to do justice to the fame of the living.” after, in 1769 ; during all which time the entire of his I am sorry to perceive by a letter under the head of She- mother's manuscripts remained out of bis reach ; at a 'ridan's Rivals,in your last Gazette, that the wish to rob distance from him; and exposed to all the hazards of the dead of their fame is not contined to the Edinburgh his father's itinerant life from France to England and Reviewers. The Writer states that, “ Mention is made,” Ireland, and from Ireland to England again. The cir. in Dr. Watkins's Life of Mr. Sheridan, “ of a finished cumstance of the finished comedy," baving never after comedy called • A Trip to Bath left by Mrs. Sheridan, been brought forward by her husband, fully warrauts a mother to the subject of the Biography, at her death." belief that the manuscript was mislaid or irrecoverably lost, Her husband bad mentioned this finished comedy in his let- in bis removals from place to place during so many years. ters from Blois in 1764. Your Correspondent quotes from Mrs. Sheridan had made a very large sum by the upDr. W.'s work—" It is known to baye obtained the sanc- precedented success of her first comedy, "The Distion of Garrick and Murphy, and through them, I believe, covery." She had, also, received the profits of a benefit Dr. Johnson was prevailed upon to give it a perusal with night; the purchase money of the copy-right from Millar, his judgment upon its merits, which was decidedly in its the bookseller, and a free gift of one hundred pounds favor. Notwithstanding the stamp, which this manuscript more from him, for the “uncommon great” sale of her received from such high authorities, it never made its ap- second comedy “The Dupe,The saleable quality of pearance before the Public; this is the more unaccount- Mrs. Sheridan's dramatic works was tbus established in able, considering the peculiar circumstances and profes-1763. It is not at all probable that her busband, if the sional pursuits of Mr. Sheridan, who caused the two re- finished comedy had not been lost, would have retained it maining volumes of Sidney Biddulph to be printed, but sin his hands for three years from her death, in 1766, totally neglected the other literary remains of the Author.” until the return of his son, Richard Brimsley, from Harrow,

in 1769, without endeavouring to convert it into money, of letters. By this institution might be brought together, from while her dramatic fame was still fresh in the mind of the all parts of the world, persons versed in every art and science, public. This is rendered still more improbable by the and in every branch of literature. Some would doubtless facts that her husband was pennyless when she died; attend, without any specific mission, and attracted only by the was obliged to borrow money to defray the expences of universities, academies, and literary corporations; but all should

pleasure of being present; others might be sent to represent her funeral, and continued to struggle with want, debts, possess an equal right to be present at the sittings of the asand difficulties during the three years before Richard's sembly. The genius which creates, the liability, which brings return. He must also have felt an anxious wish to add to perfection, the imagination which embellishes, and the to the fame of his deceased wife, by giving publicity to philanthropy

, which converts the whole into fresh means of the finished comedy, the Trip to Baih, if it had not been human happiness, thus united, would derive new energy, and mislaid or lost. We are told that this comedy had been act with increasing intensity, from the concentration of instruc approved of by Garrick, Murphy, and Johnson. Her tion, and from the interchange of sentiment. husband, therefore, if he had had the manuscript at her Christianity adopts and sanctifies every institution that tends

Essentially allied to knowledge and to virtue, the genius of death, must have been certain by its success, on the stage 10 enlighten and to ameliorate the condition of humanity. and in the closet, of about a thousand pounds. It remains, Hostile alone to error,' it opens its boson to the wanderer, therefore, for the defamers of her son in his grave, to shew whatever be his sect, his colour, or origin; and enjoins towards any probability for a supposition that her husband had the would be to deny the spirit of the Christian doctrine. Nor are manuscript for three years after she died, and that be chose the principles of sound policy at variance with Christianity, so far to suppress her fame, and continue to struggle in thus understood. For, reposing upon the same bases, it will distress, in preference to raising a large sum by selling it always lead to consequences, favourable to liberty and to to the managers and booksellers. All my reasoning is public order. The Evangelists must ever indeed form a bulstrengthened by the fact, that he sold the two last volumes wark against despotism, which constantly endeavours to found of her Sydney Biddulph after her death; and that the itself upon a supposed demonstration of the will of heaven in

its favour.2 property and retention of her manuscripts rested with bim for two and twenty years afterwards, until his decease in notwithstanding their severity; for it would avow the objector

No one, I delight to believe, will complain of these truths, 1788.

C. Y.

an accomplice in the guilt they denounce. Time may perhaps Plan of a general Association of learned und scientific men, and loves, without restriction, the liberty of the press, and for his

produce the phænomenon,-as yet unseen, of a prince, who of Artists of all Nations, for accelerating the progress of Civis name history preserves an unsullied page. That name (had lization, of Morals, and of Illumination. By the Abbé Gregoire, the king, who illustrated it, lived in our days,) would have been Er. Bishop of Blois. Translated and arranged by Sir T. Charles Alfred, he who wished his subjects to be free as their thoughts. Norgan, M.D. (Continued.)

But whatever be the disposition of rulers, it is not in the na

ture of things that the press should continue shackled. In The schools of antiquity formed an assemblage of scholars spite of every obstacle it will burst forth; as air, when conderived from several different nations; and in the periodic fined, acquires new elasticity by its compression. The liberty festivals of Greece and Rome (the Olympic and Secular games) of the press is dangerous only to the perverse and to the designthe learned found a place, as accessories to the ceremony; but ing: it can never injure a government, founded on the prinneither of these institutions forin an exact type of the Congress ciples of justice. It would, on the contrary, mark the errors, under consideration.

which are thrown into circulation, make manifest intrigues, At the commencement of the last century, Italy abounded in indicate abuses for reformation, and useful projects for adops academies, which held meetings for the recitation of sonnets, tion; and thus it would contribute to the glory of the governand for reading solemn and formal discourses. MURATORI feel- ment and the happiness of the people; for ihe interests of ing the inutility of establishments thus arranged, proposed to both are the same, since it is so contrived by Providence, that unite them into one society, which, being open to every species nothing is really useful, but that which is at the same time of talent, should interest itself in the perfection of all. This just and true. plan would have embraced the whole literary republic of Italy, When England began the discussion of the first principles of of which Murators himself would have been the principal lier government, James II. asked his courtiers if the soveornament. It was not however part of his plan, to hold meet- reignty really vested of right with the people. “That,” said ings, in any fixed place, but to unite the members, scattered the party addressed, “is a point for kings to believe, but not a over the whole of Italy, hy the establishment of archons, (one subject to be dwelt upon by the people." The answer was of whom he designed to be president) of counsellors, censors, and a secretary, whose functions were to bave been triennial. ' How unfortunate the discrepance between the principles This project, though rich in profound views, was never put and practice, in all sects of religion! into execution.'

2 In point of fact, the Christian religion has subsisted under At Olten in Switzerland, there existed, for many years, an every form of government; and its doctrines have been wrested assembly (purely national indeed) but which in some measure to support every system in its turn. Where the superior clergy realized the ideas of Muratori; and at the end of the last have prevailed in the hierarchy, they have united with the century, the arrival of many foreigners of scientific distinction government against the people, and have advocated divine right, at Paris, to assist the French philosophers in fixing the fund-though contradictory at once to natural religion and to reveamental unity of their new system of weights and measures, lation. Where the inferior clergy have become powerful, they gave a still clearer image of the proposed Congress.-On the have sided with the people and have made Christianity a repubbasis of these facts, rests the possibility of assembling a diet, lican code. Generally speaking, the existence of the Christian which might form an ecumenical representation of the republic hierarchy has been favourable to liberty, by the establishment

of an imperium in imperio, a third order in the state, neutralizing - Reflessione sopra il buon gusto intorno le scienze e le arte, the power of the sword, and preparing mankind for the empire di LAMINDO PRITANJO the academic appellation of Murators, of learning, which has gradually migrated into that of opinion. 12mo. Venezia 1708. reprinted with augmentations in 1766. The clergy struggled for power for themselves, and the people Venezia, 2 vols. in 12mo.

have in many countries profited by their conquests. Tr.

more

liament, therefore I feel roused to a degree of eight syllable -Upon the above passage, your Correspondent has inverse; and as for old English, it has become quite indis- sinuated a heinous charge against her son Richard Brinspensable, ever since the battle of Trafalgar." Thus, Sir, ley Sheridan, namely that of having, defrauded his deyou see, the conclusions follow each other as naturally as ceased mother of the fame due to this finished comedy, by the quotient produced from multiplying by the shovel and suppressing the manuscript, and pilfering from it the tongs, and dividing by the poker. Of course the old idea basis or materials of bis comedy of the Rivals! I give here is entirely exploded, that arts flourish most when arms the words of this infamous accusation—“What” is “ have ceased.

probable than that Mr. Sheridan, who certainly has been But the mischief, which, according to this new doctrine, esteemed not scrupulously nice respecting such subjects, we must expect, is, that, now we are no longer at war, should take advantage of a manuscript of this description our poetry will dwindle once more into mere Queen existing in the family, to raise himself a reputation as a Anneism; that Lord Byron will forthwith put his pen upon dramatic writer, without the labor and anxiety of being the peace establishment, and Walter Scott himself turn one ?"-Now, Sir, I shall first notice that Dr. Watkins, who, Pastoral Master-General to the department of rills and in his interesting work, has certainly manifested no bias in roses. Nay, the great Review, too, must partake of the favor of the late Mr. Sheridan, does not hint any such odisoft infection; and even now, the symptoms are apparent; ous charge against him; and I shall shew by a few facts that ivasmuch as that very work, which, animated of course by the whole known chain of circumstances and probabilities the war, biad formerly eulogized Pope with such eloquent are against the insinuated accusation of your correspondent. enthusiasm, has already, since the piping times of peace, In the beginning of 1762, Richard Brinsley Sheridan was lowered its lofty phraseology, and talked of bis powers sent to school at Harrow, where be remained until his with tameness and indifference.

eighteenth year, which was in 1769. During that time I am, Sir, your obedient servant, COLLATOR. he was at a distance from bis parents. In September

1764, they took his elder brother and his sister with them SHERIDAN VINDICATED.

to France and settled at Blois. Within less than two To the Editor of the Literary Gazette. years after her arrival there, she wrote the "finished Sir, I read with much pleasure, in your first num- comedy," mentioned by your correspondent, called " A ber, your just condemnation of a recent attempt to exalt Trip to Bath ;" and the two last volumes of Sidney the character of the Writers of Scotland, by a grave asser-Biddulph. This fact is proved by her husband, who in tion in the Edinburgh Review that.“ the Writers, who a letter from Blois to Ms. Samuel White of Dublin, in adorned the beginning of the last century, have been August 1766, says, she wrote them "since our arrival eclipsed by the Writers of our own time." I admire the here." Thus the “ finished comedy" was written in rich imagination of Scott, the tender pathos of Camp. France, while her son Brinsley was in England; and bell, the fine fancy and feeling of Byron and Moore, and when he was only in bis fifteenth year. In that same the devotional fervor and chaste flights of Montgomery, letter, her husband states “I am reduced to my last without losing my relish for the works of Dryden, Pope, Louis," and adds, “I must conjure you by all that is Addison, Parnel, Gay, Swift, and their select contempo- sacred in friendship, to raise a hundred pounds for me as raries. I consider every attempt to rob our ancestors of speedily as possible, and convey it to W. Whately, Esq. their fame, as an attempt to rob our common country, Banker in London, for my use." In the midst of his distress, which is entitled to the sum total of all our glory in arts in a strange country, before he received the requested and arms. A sentiment in your last paper fully ex- loan, Mrs. Sheridan died almost suddenly, on the 26th of presses mine—“ We would divide our own time from September 1766 : and as already noticed, her son R. the past, not to overturn the monuments consecrated to Brinsley did not join his father's family until three years the dead, but to do justice to the fame of the living." after, in 1769 ; during all which time the entire of his I am sorry to perceive by a letter under the head of “She- mother's manuscripts remained out of his reach ; at a 'ridan's Rivals," in your last Gazette, that the wish to rob distance from him; and exposed to all the hazards of the dead of their fame is not contined to the Edinburgh his father's itinerant life from France to England and Reviewers. The Writer states that, “ Mention is made," Ireland, and from Ireland to England again. The cirin Dr. Watkins's Life of Mr. Sheridan, “ of a finished cumstance of the finished comedy," baving never after comedy called A Trip to Bath left by Mrs. Sheridan, been brought forward by her busband, fully warrants a mother to the subject of the Biography, at her death." belief that the manuscript was mislaid or irrecoverably lost, Her husband bad mentioned this finished comedy in his lęt-in bis removals from place to place during so many years. ters from Blois in 1764. Your Correspondent quotes from Mrs. Sheridan had made a very large sum by the un. Dr. W.'s work—“ It is known to bave obtained the sanc- precedented success of her first coinedy, "The Distion of Garrick and Murphy, and through them, I believe, covery." She had, also, received the profits of a benefit Dr. Johnson was prevailed upon to give it a perusal with night; the purchase money of the copy-right from Millar, his judgment upon its merits, which was decidedly in its the bookseller, and a free gift of one hundred pounds favor. Notwithstanding the stamp, which this manuscript more from him, for the “ uncommon great” sale of her received from such high authorities, it never made its ap- second comedy The Dupe.” The saleable quality of pearance before the Public; this is the more unaccount Mrs. Sheridan's dramatic works was tbus established in able, considering the peculiar circumstances and profes- 1763. It is not at all probable that her busband, if the sional pursuits of Mr. Sheridan, who caused the two re- finished comedy had not been lost, would have retained it maining volumes of Sidney Biddulph to be printed, but sin his hands for three years from her death, in 1766, totally neglected the other literary remains of the Author." until the return of his son, Richard Briosley, from llarrow,

in 1709, without endeavourng to convert it into money, of letters. By this institution might be brought together, trumn while her dramatic fame was still fresh in the mund of the all parts of the world, persona verurd in every art and usene, puble. This is rendered still more improbable by the and on every brand of literature. Some would doubtless facts that her husband was pennvless when she died: attend, without any specific ruwon, and attracted suiv by the *** obliged to borrow money to defray the expences of ubesettetot being present, others might be sent to represent her funeral, and continued to struggle with want, debis. possess an equal right to be present at the sittings of the as and dificulties during the three years before Richard' sembiv. The geous which creates, the inability which brings retum. He must also have felt an anxious wish to add to perfection, the imagination which embe ihshes, and the to the fame of bis deceased wife, by giving publicity to pulanthropy which couverts the whole into trust means of the timeshed comedy, the Trip to Bain, if it hard not been human happiness, thus unned, would derive new energy, and misand or lost. We are told that this comedy bad bren act with increasing intensity, fr-tn the concentratum of instruc apprord of by Garrick, Murphy, and Johnson. Her

tion, and from the interchange of sentiment.

Essentially alised to knowled:e and to virtue, the groun of busband, therefore, if he bad had the manuscript at her Christianity adopts and sanctifies every institution that trnds death, must have been certain by its success, ou tbe stage to enlighten und w ameiwrate the condition of humans. and in the closet, of about a thousand pounds. Je remains, Hosule alone to error,' it opens its boson to the wanderri, therefore, for the defamers of her son io bis grave, to show whatever be his sect, his colour, of origin; and enjoins towards ey probability for a supposition that her husband had the buna benevolence and chants--to insusi longer want this point, manuscript for three years after she diert

, and that be chose the principles of sound policy at vananer with e tretant;

would be to deny the spint of the Christian doctrine. Nor are so far to suppress her fame, and continue to struggle in thus understood. For, reposing upon the same bases, it word distress, in preference to raising a large sum by selling it always lead to consequences, tavourable to litzerty and to to the managers and booksellers. All my reasoning is public order. The Evangelists must evet indeed surm a boule strengthened by the face, that he sold the two last volumes wark againsi de polism, whucha constantly endeavour wf-und of ber Sydney Biddulph after her death; and that the liselt upon a supposed demonstration of the will of heavea in property and retention of her manuscripts rested with bim "es tavour.' for two and twenty years afterwards, until his decease in notwithstandmg their severity; for it would avow the ol vertur

No one, I delight to believe, will complain of these iruthia, 1759.

C.Y.

an accomplice in the guide they denounce 1me may for than Pienos general Asocielton of learned and wantific men, and loves, without restration, the blerty of the preos, and to live

produce the pha nomenon,-.* yet unseen, of a petr, * * Alusta af eil Nelsons, for accelerating the progress of (ozon name history preserves an unsullied page that name Isad dasan, af Morals, and in Illumination. Buide Abbe Groport, the king, wlio illustrated it, loved in our day) woodlave brea

: Husky of Blus. Translated and arranged by Sir T. Charles ALFRED, he who wished his subper is to be tree as then the abis. *2*, Al. D. (Conunued.)

But whatrver be the deposit of rulers, it is not in the

ture of things that the press should continue startled in Tesci.cols of antiquity formed an assemblage of scholars spite of every obstacle it will burst furth: as air, wheti curr Sorvet tri mn several different nations; and in the periodic tined, arquites ner elastucity try its compression. The her: test als of Greece and Rome (the Olympic and Secular games of the press is dangerous only to the perverse and to the desi. ta barard forind a place, as accessories to the ceremony: being: i can never injure a government, tuutided on the proerer at these institutions forin an exact type of the Congress ciples of justice. It would, on the cun'rary, mark the crrors, et te nation.

which are thrown into circulatan, make maustest intrigues, A. the currucement of the last century, Italy absordbeid in indicale abuses for smlormatwn, and useful pruge te for vide por

ties, whwh held meetings for the recitation of annels, cson; and thus it would contribute to the glory of the governo *****11ng solemn and formal dis ourses MURATORI !eel meat and the happiness of the peuple ; for the interests ! * nometriity of establishments thus arranged, prufcard to buth are the same, since it is so cvatnsed by Providetur, that Stem into one society, which, being open to every species nothing is really wetul, but that what is at the same tine mont, amid interest itself in the perfection of all. 1b just and true. 1% Vltave einbraced the whuie lulerary repabíu of Ilals, When England began thir discussion of the forst principle of - 1 M: LATORI himselt would have beca the prinupa hver govertiment, James II asked his courtiers at the surr

neat I was not however part of his pian, tubo meet-reigisty really vesied of night with the people "Thar," sald 8*81, 12 ary fue piace, but to uute the members, waltered the party addressed, " is a funnt for kroga to believe, but er the whole of Italy, by the establishment of archons, (one subject to be dweit urrun by the propie." The answer *** pre bombe designed to be president of counsellors, censora,

& artury, www functions were to trave been liirenital How unfortunate the discrepance between the principles 1.8 progewi, though rich in protound views, was never put and grectue, m all sorts of religini bersama

. In por out of 14:1, the Christian melipun has subestrid ur des A: ().Ts in Switzerland, there existed, for many years, an every fórrn of a vertiment; and its durtrutors have trou wreste of

a purely natronal indeed, but which in some measure to support every system in its turn lete the tipe?. leren pea'zof the weas of Miratori; and at the end of the just have prevailed to the herare bv, they have en tred with the ro', the arwal of many foreigners of scientific dietineewn covernment against itse people, and love art sted derene nahk, *1*, to assist the French phucphen in fring the fund.libouch annitatu tery at once to natural tangan and to revena ***** of their new system of weights and measupra, lat. Wiere the inverror clergy to sve les ene puertort, ibry De il clearer ima e of the proposed Congress. ---On the have sided with the purple and have madbe ( tafsat.ty a sfoglia

** of true fers, tests the possibility of assembling a diet, lucan code. Generally speaking, the eustener ut the it....n 2*gst turma a er« umenu al representataso of the sepuble hierarely ha' been tavourale interiv, vitoresla'. one of

of an imperium in imeria, a fi ord order in the latr, tur atpa 17. Resume sopra il buon go intorno le scienze e le ante, he power of the wind, and preparing mankind ter the e" : " * Paranio the academie appellation of ME KALORI, I learning, which has gratuia!!: einmased into that of copas •

l'eneru 1704 reprinted with triginestaisnis in 1706 The clerky struggled for power for themselvre, and the pers pie 14 ! rot in itmo.

have in many cuntrie* prubied by their conquefTR.

LETTER IV.

fallacious, and contrived by a truc courtier, to elude the ques- the good and the evil, and weigle advantages against inconvetion. If princes were, indeed, penetrated with this truth, they nience. If no novelty should be adopted, but such as is absowould associate theniselves with all that is truly grand and lutely free from objection, the world would inevitably reinain generous, and would call forth and recompense every species at its minimum of improvement. Let us then proceed to conof talent which tends to the perfection of civilization; and insider the composition of the congress, and to make some thus recognizing the delegated nature of their authority, they necessary remarks on the literary character. would find in the love of the people a principle of security and

(To be continued). of permanence, to which despotism, from its very nature, must ever be a stranger. On the other hand, it requires but little

LETTERS FROM LONDON. foresight to perceive the impossibility of re-establishing arbitrary power upon the basis of ignorance; and of replunging My hostess having procured some passes from her Evrope into the darkness of the middle ages. To reduce these observations to our subject, it must be re- of amusement called the Opera, and seated ourselves in

ladies' music-master, we went last night to a place

young marked, that an unlimited freedom of discussion is necessary to the utility of the congress. If, instead of an asseinbly of the pit, whence we commanded a prospect of the whole frecmen, it should be sought to procure the fattery of a troop house. You cannot imagine a finer sight. Hundreds of of slaves, it would be infinitely better that the project remain little rooms, lined with crimson, stood piled one over the for ever unexecuted. Nor would the public authorities bave other, and were full of feathers, diamonds, and ladies. any thing to fear from an assembly, over whose proceedings Some of these rooms stood on the stage itself, which was they would necessarily have a control, if they tended to dis-quite proper, considering that the people in them were turb the public tranquillity: and there is, indeed, little danger evidently actors. Indeed, so the whole company appeared of such an event from speculative opinions confined to points purely abstract, and discussed by individuals who would be, too, and perbaps, those who trod the stage were the ouly er professo, bound to respect the civil power, and to obey the real spectators ; at least, they were the only persons prelaws.

sent, who passed altogether unnoticed, and seemed quite With respect to situation, those cities which unite the pur- unconnected with the entertainmeut of the evening. Nosuits of literature with the operations of commerce, will, by body, except some foreigners who sat about me, paid any their habits of pecuniary calculation, at once perceive the ad-attention to the stage ; however, their enthusiasm alone vantage resulting to the chosen seat of such an assembly. In the very nature of things, it would become an established mart all besides. I know not what they meant by a tenor and

was more than sufficient to compensate for the neglect of and open fair for literary productions.

Among the possible obstacles to our project, it will not be a baritono, but from what they said, I could gather that expected to place those which arise from great and rare casual- the civilization of society depended in a great measure ties. Lisbon may experience another earthquake, Smyrna a upon them. One singer, they asserted, had the happiness plague, London a fire, or Paris an invasion. Such events come of heaving up her notes from a considerable deptlı. Yet not into the ordinary calculations of life; yet even these might I pitied her extremely, for, by the faces she made, it was be foreseen and obviated, in the details of organization, which evident the process put her to great pain. the congress would discuss in their first sittings. The greatest obstacle to the regular assemblies of the literati,

Ah, Madame, is it not a charming soprano?” exclaimlies in the frequency of European wars; but we may yet hope ed a yellow little foreigner, turning short round upon me. that war will not always produce an indiscriminate carnage, Really,” replied I laughing, “I must say 'tis one of the confounding sex and age; and that it may become a prin- tinest asthmas I ever heard in my life.” ciple in the law of nations, to consider the children of science about, my dear ?” cried my female companion, quite shockas at peace with the whole world. It may be asked if the present be a fit time for the execution wittiest lady in the world !”

ed. "About!” echoed the bowing Frenchman, "about the of our plan; and there is no reason why the question may not be answered in the affirmative. The exaggerated feelings of

Delighted with his repartee, he naturally became pleased the revolution have relapsed into a calm, and the nations of with the object of it, so began chattering away, and soon Europe feel intimately the necessity for repose. A closer cal- ivitiated me into the mysteries of the whole Italian Opera ; culation of interests has taught them the absurdity of destroy- which is, indeed, a most comical device. The dialogue ing each other in the quarrels of a few individuals—in quarrels being in Italian, not one in a hundred can know the plot of which would very soon be adjusted if the world once agreed to the play-a great advantage to the author, who may thus follow the example of that tribe of the Franks who, as AgaTHIAS relates, forced the parties concerned to descend person

write regular nonsense with impunity. The dramatis perally into the arena, and to fight it out with each other. The sonæ consist, for the most part, of distressed kings and operation of recent events has, however, tended so to mingle princesses, who conduct their affairs in recitative, and on the nations of Europe together, that they have become less all trying occasions, come out with a song. The fate of French, Englislı, or German, and thereby are rendered more an empire is sometimes announced by a cadenza. Is the European.

heroine in a fret? she sings. Is the hero in a rage? he It has been asserted that the project of a congress would meet with opposition even amongst the learned themselves,

sings too. Does he purpose to attack a citadel ? he sings and the objection affords a new motive for laying it open for to liis soldiers on the breach, and his soldiers sing to him, their consideration. It is, however, more probable, that to and the enemy on the battlements sing to both, and then establish such an assembly would anticipate and realize their all three sing to each other; after which, the battle goes general wish. The restlessness of talent, the spirit of investi- on swimmingly. gation, the incessant desire of extending knowledge, would People may say that this is unnatural. But if the rolling find, in the execution of this design, a means of satisfaction spheres themselves are set to music, why should not an and of fi:l6lment. Among the members of the republic of let-affair of state have its music too? Certain I am, that a ters, there doubtless would be found some who would attach little or no value to the proposal. If it be bad, their reasonable few fiddles at St. Stephen's would do as much service to censure would condemn it; if good, it would still be improved the nation as half its orators. kw the discussion. In the scales of the balance we must place As soon as the opera was over, the house began to fill,

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