網頁圖片
PDF
ePub 版

118.

5. I. 26.

of physic), medicine, drug : 2.2. Poulder, n. (+ form of powder): 157, 5. 2. 62.

4. I. 106, 4. 5. 214, passim. Pick-tooth, n., ta tooth-pick: Poxe, n., a disease characterized 2. 4. 143.

by eruptive pocks or pustules Pike, n., a weapon made of a upon the body; an English

single spike, flat as the lance name for the Gallicus morbus, was, used previous to the which is the significance here. bayonet by the infantry. In In the 16th and 17th centuries length it was twelve to fourteen it usually means small pox : feet. Under George III it be- 3. 5. 68. (The spelling is ircame extinct: 4. 5. 109.

regular for pocks, pl. of pock.) Pipkin, n., a small earthen pot Poxe, interj., an imprecation :

with or without a cover, and 1. I. 86, 4. 2. 79, passim. with a horizontal handle: 2. 5. Precise, adj., tthe quality of being

a Precisian, a Puritan : 2. 2. 80. +Playse mouth, n. (+ form of Preferre, V., tto recommend : plaice-mouth), having a small 2. 5. II. wry mouth like a plaice, or flat- Presently, adv., tinstantly, imfish: 3. 4. 41.

mediately: 2. 1. 18, 2. 4. 62, Pleasant, adj., witty, facetious : 2. 5. 93, passim.

Pretious, adj.,(tform of precious): Poast, v. i. (+form of post), to 4. I. 115. [L. pretiosus.] travel rapidly: 2. 4. 104.

Prime-men, n., principal men: Point, n., a lace with tags at the 5. I. 34.

end, about six or eight inches Primero, n. Cf. note: 4. 4. long, made of silk, leather, or 167. of three differently colored Principall, n., chief, leader : 2. 5. threads of yarn twisted together 69; original : 4. 5. 102. and having their ends wrapped Prize, n., a contest: 1. I. 181. with wire. They were used to Proctor, n., an officer of the fasten clothes together until the admiralty and ecclesiastical 17th century, when pins were courts, whose duties and busiintroduced. Sometimes used ness correspond exactly to those as small stakes at gambling : of an attorney at law or solicitor 3. I. 54.

in chancery.--Black, Dict. of Politie, n., +policy : 3. 1. 20. Law : 4. 7. 17, passim. Porcpisce, n. (+form of porpoise), Profess, V., to pretend, to assume:

a North Atlantic cetacean of 2. 4. 42. the family Delphinidae: 4. 4. Progresse, n., a journey or circuit 144. [L. porcus, hog; piscis, of state : 2. 2. 117. fish.]

Propertie, n., a tool: 3. 3. 24. Post, n., a messenger : 2. 4. 11. Protested, ppl. adj., +publicly Post-horse, n., a horse kept or avowed : 4. 5. 71.

hired for forwarding post-riders Pure, adj., tfine ; clean : 4. 6. 29. or travelers with speed: 1. I. Purely, adv., greatly, remark27.

ably : 2. 6. 18.

[ocr errors]

n.,

100.

Purse-net, n., a net the mouth +Reformado, n., a military officer

of which may be drawn close whom disgrace had deprived of with cords : 3. 3. 94.

command, but retained his rank Put i' the head, phr., to be and perhaps his pay: 5. 2. 68.

angry: 3. 3. 4. No dictionary Religion, + conscientious recognition of the phrase.

scruple : 3. 5. 47. Put to, v., to apply (to the test): Relique, n. (tform of relic): 5.4.

2. 3. 10; (with a pers. obj. of 74. the verb and of the prep.) to Resolue, V., to express by resoluconsign to: 4. 4. 101; (with a tion or vote: 4. 5. 140; fto free pers. obj. of the verb and an from doubt, to inform : 3. 2. 25, impers. obj. of the prep.) to try, 4. 7. 19; to prepare : 5. 4.

to test: 2. 5. 65. Put vpon, V., to palm off on : 2. 4. Resolution, n., tdecision, judg42, 3.6.43; to set on : 4. 2. 149. ment: 5. 3. 37, 5. 4. 147.

+Resty, adj. (a reduced form of Quarter-feast, n., a feast cele- restive), stubborn, obstinate : brating Quarter-day, which was

1. I. 175. one of the four days fixed by Reuell, n., a kind of dance or custom as marking off the choric performance often given quarter of the year on which in connection with a masque or tenancy of houses usually begins pageant : 3. 5.50. [L. rebellare, and ends, and the payment of same word as Mod. E. rebel, rent and other quarterly charges which is the learned as revel is falls due; in England and Ire- the popular word through the land these are Lady Day, Fr.] Mar. 25; Midsummer Day, Rouersion, n. (Law), the residue June 24; Michaelmas, Sept. 29; of an estate left in the grantor,

Christmas, Dec. 25: 2. 4. 110. to commence in possession after Quit, v., tto acquit: 1. I. 161; the determination of some parthe form of this flower, worn on Sharke, n., ta sharper, cheat hat, gown, or shoes: 2. 2. 68, swindler: 4. 4. 166. 70, 2. 5. 79.

to requite : 3. 3. 59 ; fto be free, ticular estate granted out by rid of: 5. 4. 30, 188.

him ; the return of land to the

grantor and his heirs after the Rankness, n., textravagance : 4. grant is over; sometimes the 5. 346.

promise of an office to an Rarely, adv., excellently, finely: aspirant after the resignation

4. 4. 64, 4. 5. 233. Very common or death of the present inin 17th century.

cumbent : 2. 2. 45. Recouer, v., to get for, return to: Ring, n., a set of bells tuned to 4. 7. 36.

each other: 2. 1. 8. Though Reference, n. (Law), in contracts, Jonson seems to mean simply

an agreement to submit to a bell, such as is common on certain arbitrators matters in doors. dispute between two or more Rooke, n., ta simpleton, gull: 1. parties for decision and agree- 4. 78, 3. 3. 2. ment: 4.7. 16.

Rose, n., a ribbon gathered into the language of the time: 1. I. Sargeant, n., ta bailiff: 4. 5. 191. 187. 'Saue, interj. (abbreviation for the +Birrah, n., a word of address

Shoo-thrid, n., a shoemaker's Ruffe, n., a projecting band or

thread: 4. 2. 90. frill, plaited or bristling, worn Showe, v. i., to appear, to look : about the neck: 2. 5. 79, 3. 2. 1. I. 63. 22, 72.

Shroue-tuesday, n., the Tuesday Rushe, n., a plant of the order before the first day in Lent, or Juncaceae, formerly used for Ash Wednesday, so called from strewing floors by way of cover- the custom of making confession ing, in houses, the stage of the on that day: 1. I. 160, 3. 1. 7. theatre, &c. : 1. I. 22, 65.

[OE. scrīfan, to shrive.]

Sicknesse, n., the plague; a speSadnesse, n., +gravity, earnest : cific application of the word in 4. 3. 13.

greeting), God save : 1. 4. I, here equivalent to 'fellow', passim.

often to'sir', with a contempScandale, n., offence : 4. 2. 139. tuous force: 2. 5. 95, 3. 4. 51. Scene, n., a stage, the place Sixt, adj., sixth : 5. 3. 137. [OE. where dramatic pieces are per

sixta.] formed : ANOTHER 1. [L. Sleek, v., to iron, to smooth: 2.

scena, stage.] Sciruy (+form of scurvy): 4. 2. 75. +'Slid, interj., exclamation ab+8empster, n., a man or woman breviated from God's (eye)lid:

employed in sewing : 2. 2. 110. [OE. seamestre.]

Slight, n.(tform of sleight), a trick, Seruant, n., professed lover, contrivance: ANOTHER 11.

authorized admirer (correlative 'Slight, interj., a contraction of of mistress): 1. I. 126, 2. 2. 129, by this light, or God's light: 2. 3. 15, 17, passim.

2. 3. 5, 2. 4. 25, passim. +Sess, V., assess, tax: 4. 5. 112. Smocke, n., chemise: 2. 6. 42, Set, v., to stake at play, wager : 5. I. 54.

Snuffe, n. (from the phrase to take +Sew, V., to serve at table, as by it in snuff, to grow angry), to go

carving, tasting, &c.: 3. 7. 17 away in snuffe : 4. 5. 170. MN.

So, adv. (phr, or so), or about +Sewer, n., á servant who waits thus; or thereabouts; or some

at table: 3. 3. 66, 98 MN, 3. 7. thing of that kind : 5. 1. 54, 19.

5. 4. 114. Shame-fac'd, adj., modest: 3. 7. Sooth, n., tcajolery, blandish

28. [Formerly shamefast. Fast ment: 5. 2. 82. is adj. meaning 'confirmed', Sound, v. i., to cause something and shame'modesty'in a good (as an instrument) to sound or sense.]

play: 4. 2. 19. U

6. 42.

I. 2. II.

4. 4. 166.

1. 19.

5. 4. 108.

ence :

Squire, n. (+form of square): 5. Target, n., a shield of any form,

used in 17th century by inState, n., testate, income: 2. 2. fantry soldiers as a substitute

144; style of living, mode of for body armor : 4. 4. 18. life: 2. 1. 15. Besides these Tell, v., to command: 4. 5. 298. Jonson uses the word in all its Tempt, v., #to try, test : 4. 5. 152, varied senses. Cf. for its history

W. and their Ways, p. 235. Terme, n., a term of court: 1. 1. 50. Stentor, n., a person having a Terme time, n., time during a

powerful voice: 4. 2. 125. [L. term of court: 2. 5. 108. Stentor, Gr. Erévtwp.]

Then, adv. conj., than : 2. I. 1, Stiffely, adv., stubbornly: 1. I. 3. 5. 23, 3. 7. 6, 4. 6. 29, passim. 154.

Thriftily, adv., *punctiliously: Stile, n. (tform of style) : 2. 2. 5. 4. 238. 118.

|| Tinke, n., a tinkling sound : 2. Still, adv., always, ever: AN- 3.41. This onomatopoetic word

OTHER 3, 2. 1. 31, passim. seems to be another Jonsonian Stinkardly, adj., stinking, mean: coinage. 4. 2. 109.

To, prep., with : 3. 5. 88. Cf. || Stoicitie, n., stoical indiffer- Abbott, § 185; for: 1. 3. 56,

1. 1. 66. A Jonsonian 4. 4. 74, 4. 5. 288; against : 1. coinage.

2. 64. Cf. Abbott, 186. Suffer, v. i., to undergo punish- Tother, in the expression the ment: 4. 5. 263.

tother', a corruption of 'that Sufficient, adj., qualified, com- other': 2. 2. 119, 2. 5. 80. petent: 4. 7. 20.

Trow, interj. (abbreviated form Superstitious, adj., tover-exact, of I trow), I wonder : 4. 5. 38,

scrupulous, beyond need : 5. 3. 5. 2. 65. 129. Cf. note.

Truncheon, n., a staff of authoSure, adv., surely: 4. 5. 208, 5. 3. rity : 1. 3. 54. 239.

Trunke, n., ttube. Here a speakSwabber, n., one who uses a ing tube : 1. I. 194, 2. I. 2.

swab; hence, in contempt, a Turbant, n. (+form of turban), fellow fit only to use a swab: 'a Turkish hat of white and

fine linen, wreathed into a

rundle ; broad at the bottome Take, v., to please, attract : 1. I. to enclose the head, and lessen67, 101.

ing, for ornament, towards the Take up, v., fto stop: 4. 5. 41; top'.-Cotgrave: 1. 1. 145.

to borrow or obtain for the pur- Twanging, adj., tfine, swinging : pose of borrowing : 1.4. 66, 67, 5. 3. 10. Cf. note. 71, 2. 5. 118. Cf. commodity, Tyranne, n. (+form of tyrant) : and note: 2. 5. 118.

2. 2. 73; tyrannie: 3. 2. 10. Tame, adj., sane: 4. 4. 102. Tyre, n., attire; headdress : 3. 3. Tane, p.p. (abbrev. form of) III, 4. 1. 61, 118 (a simplified taken: 2. 6. 61.

form of tiara).

4. 4. 168.

a

+ Tyre-woman, n., female Well, adj. (used pred.), happy, dresser, a lady's maid: 2.2. 110. well off : 2.6.66; out of trouble :

4. 2. 147, 5. 3. 179. +Vegetous, adj., vigorous, active: Welt, n., Ian applied hem, a 2. 2. 67.

bordering, fringe : 4. 7. 43. Venter, v. i., venture: 1. 2. 21, Whiniling, adj. Cf. note, 4. 5. 2. 2. 6.

231. Visor, n., pretence: 2. 4. 36, 4. 5. Whitsontide, n., the season of 62.

Pentecost, comprehending the Vnder-take, v. i., to assume a entire week following Pentecost

responsibility: 4. 5. 318; to Sunday: 3. 1. 7.

promise, warrant: 5. 4. 252. Whitsun - holy - day, n., the Voyce, n., fterm, word: 4. 7. seventh Sunday after Easter, in 15.

commemoration of the descent Vp-braid, v.i., to offer as a charge of the Holy Spirit on the day of

against something: 4. 5. 275. Pentecost : 3. 1. 48. Cf, note.

+Whorson, adj., bastard-like, Vpon, prep., at: 4. 5. 330. Cf. scurvy : 5. 3. 193. Abbott, $ 180.

Will, v. (used tr, with pers. obj.), Vrge, v., fto provoke, incite, ex- to bid, request : 3. 3. 12. asperate : 4. 1. 10.

+Windore, n. (a perversion of Vsher, n., gentleman-usher : 2.2. window): 1. I. 179, 189, 2. 2. 26. 109. Cf. note, 1. 4. 58.

Wind-sucker, n., a hawk known Vtter, v., 7to dispose of to the as wind-hover or kestrel : 1. 4.

public in the way of trade : 4. 77. Cf. notes, 1. 4. 77, 4. 4. 192. 6. 4. Cf. note.

Wire, n., material used to stiffen

garments, and to dress hair Waight, n. (tform of wait), night upon: 2. 5. 78, 3. 2. 72.

musician, street player : 1. I. With, prep., to: 2. 6. 52. Cf. 164. Cf. note.

Abbott, § 194 ; by, used very Water-man, n., a boatman or rarely with an agent: 5. 2. 24. ferryman of the Thames : 3. 4.

Cf. Abbott, $ 193. 31.

Witty, adj., twise, clever : 4. 1. Weake, adj., injudicious : 2. 4. 94. 26, 71.

Wood, n., a crowd : 2. 2. 82.

« 上一頁繼續 »