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beautifying the skin : 2. 2. 140. (L. fucus, rock-lichen, red dye,

rouge ... N. E. D.] +Furder, adv., further: 4. 5. 40.

naughtie actes; wicked; un

gracious'. [L. facinorosus.] Fain, v., tform of feign: AN

OTHER 10, 2. 4. 11; faign : 2. 2. 102; faine: 1. I. 21, 3. 2.

77, passim. Fame, n., reputation, good or bad:

Dedic. 14, 4. 6. 32, 5. 4. 242,

248; report: 5. 2. 61. Family, n., fthe household, ser

vants of the house : 4. I. II. Far fet, adj., far-fetched : PROL.

21.

Fauour, n., tleave, permission :

Galley-foist, n., a state barge,

2. 4. 88, 3. 2. 87, 5. 3. 87. Festiuall, adj., tglad, merry:

2. 4. 119. Fift, adj., fifth: 5. 3. 136. The

normal form fift still survives in dialects; the standard form, which first appeared in the 14th century, is due to analogy

with fourth. [OE. fifta.] Flock-bed, n., a bed filled with

flocks : 2. I. II. [OF. floc, lock

of wool.] For you, prep. phr., with you,

ready to act with you : 1. 3. 12,

2. 6. 21. Cf. Abbott, $ 155. Foresaid, adj., aforesaid : 4.2. 76. Forsooth, adv., tin truth, truly:

4. 4. 122. Fortune, n., pure chance: 2. 4.

73, 74, 3. 4. 3. [L. fortuna, re-
lated to forti-, fors, chance, and
ferre, to bear. N.E. D.]
Foule, adj., ugly: 1.1.115,2. 2.69.
Free, V., fto absolve, to acquit:

Dedic. 14.
Frequent, adj., tabundant: 4. 1.

59.
Fright, v., to frighten: 2. 5. 98,

111, 4. 5. 220 MN., 4. 7. 13. From, prep., apart from: 1. I.

77. Cf. Abbott, $ 158. || Fucus, n., paint or cosmetic for

esp. as here, the one used upon the Lord Mayor's Day, when he was sworn into his office at Westminster. 'A foist, a light galley that hath about 16 or 18 oares on a side, and two rowers to an oare.'—Cotgrave :

4. 2. 127. Gamester, n., gambler ; merry,

frolicsome person: 1.4.23, 3. 1.

37. Genius, n., a good spirit presiding

over a man's destiny: 2. 4. 76. Gentlenesses, n. pl., elegancies:

4. I. 52. This seems a unique

instance of the word. Gird, n., Ia gibe, taunt: 2. 5. 48. Gods so, interj., variant of

Gadso, after oaths beginning with God's. Gadso is a variation of Catso through false connection with other oaths beginning with God. Gad is minced pronunciation for God: 2. 4. 101,

4. 2. 27. Godwit, n., a marsh bird, genus

Limosa, formerly of great repute for the table. In 16th and 17th centuries used to render L. Attager, Spanish Francolin :

1. 4. 46. Goe away, tto die : 4. I. 20. Grace, n., tto do grace, to reflect

credit: 3. 6. 26; to do a favor :

4. 3. 31. Graft, v. i., fto give horns to, to

cuckold : 3. 6. 108. Cf. note

under hornes, 3. 6. 109. +Groates-worth, n., as much as

is bought or sold for a groat; of Great Britain, of the value of 4. 2. 97. two shillings and sixpence : 3. Honest, tv., to confer honor 1. 36.

a small amount. The English +Hart, interj., Heart! an oath groat was coined in 1351-2, equivalent to God's heart! It valued at fourpence. In 1662 is found also as Ods heart, it was withdrawn from circula

's heart !: 1. 3. 50. tion, and not afterwards coined Hau’-boye, n. (haut-boy), a

under that name : 4. 4. 107, &c. wooden double-reed wind inGroome, n., ta man-servant: 2.2. strument of high pitch, having

15,108, 3. 6. 107, 4. 3. 23, 5.4.11. a compass of about two and Guift, n. (tform of gift): 3.6. 87. a half octaves forming a treble Guilder, n. (tform of gilder), one to the bassoon ; modern oboe ;

who practises gilding as an art here used for the player : 1. I. or trade : 1. I. 120.

163 Gules, n., gullet: 4. 5. 326; Heicfar, n. (tvariant of heifer),

(Her.) red, the heraldic color wife : 2. 5. 68. [OE. heahfore, represented in engraving by heahfru,-fre, of obscure etymovertical lines: 1.4.41. [L.gula.] logy.-N. E. D.] Cf. note.

'Hem, pro. pl. them: 4. 5. 241, Ha', v. (have), Ito take, convey : 244, 246, passim. Cf. Cent.

2. 2. 151 ; (as auxiliary verb) Dict. under He, 1, D, c: Obj. 4. 5. 234.

(dat.) hemt emt 'em. Common Habit, n., #dress: 4. I. 119.

in early Mod. E., in which it Halberd, n., a weapon borne, came to be regarded as a contr.

up to the close of the 18th of the equiv. them, and was century, by all sergeants of therefore in the seventeenth posts, artillery, and marines, century often printed 'hem, and by companies of halberdiers 'em. [OE. him, heom; ME. in various regiments. It was hem, ham, heom, &c.] a strong wooden shaft six feet Herald, n., trumpeter, in length, surmounted by an nouncer of official news : 3. 7. instrument much resembling a 42. bill-hook, for cutting and thrust- Hermaphroditicall, adj., of both ing, with a cross-piece of steel sexes : I. I. 81. less sharp for the purpose of Hilts, n. pl. used for sing. hilt: pushing; one end of the cross- 4. 5. 310. piece was turned down as a Hobby-horse, n., ta foolish fellow, hook, used in tearing down

a buffoon: 4. 3. 55. works : 4. 5. 109.

Hold, v., fto wager, bet : 1. 3. 50; Halfe-crowne, n., a silver coin Ito restrain oneself, forbear:

upon, to honor : 1. 4. 2. +Happely, adv., thaply, by hap +Horse-meat, n., food for horses : or chance : 2. 5. 22.

3. I. 40. Harken, V., tto search by in- Humour, n., caprice, 3. 1. 12;

quiry (used with the preps. out or eccentricity: 4. 4. 169; disafter): 1. 1. 34, 1. 2.24, 4. 1. 133. position : 5. 1. 78.

an

50.

Hunting-match, n., ta hunt Intestate, n. (Law), without a taken part in by a number of

will : 4. 4. 53. persons: 1. I. 34.

It, pro., he, she: 2. 6.6, 4. 5. 280;

poss. pron., his : 2. 5. 107, 109, I, interj. (tform of aye), yes: 1. III, 113, 116, 117.

1. 47, 1. 2. 18, 1. 2. 75, 1. 3. 28, | Iumpe, v. i., tto agree : 2. 5. 42. passim.

Iust, adj., exact : 2. 5. 25. Cf. Idly, adv., tdeliriously, 4. 4. 55. Abbott, § 14. Ierkin, n., a garment for the

upper part of the body worn by Kastril, n., a species of small men in the 16th and 17th cen- hawk, Falco tinnunculus, or turies, sometimes synonymous

Tinnunculus alaudarius, rewith doublet : 1. 4. 60.

markable for its habit of susImpaire, n., impairement: 2. 5. taining itself in the same place

in the air with its head to the Impertinencie, n., irrelevancy; wind; applied to persons with

impertinence : 4. 4. 35, 5. 3. 58, contemptuous force : 4. 4. 192. 85.

Knaue, n., jocularly used withImpulsion, n., incitement: 2. 1. out unpleasant connotation as 29.

fellow, rogue: 2. 5. 19; tserIncommoditie, n., tinjury, dam- vant: 2. 2. II, 3. 4. 51. For the age: 2. 4. 14.

history of this word, and its +Ingine, n., native talent; artful obsolete uses, cf. W. and their

contrivance: 4. 6. 47. Obs. Ways, p. 286. since the middle of the 17th

century. [Lat. ingenium.] Lace-woman, n., a woman who Innocent, tan idiot: 1. 2. 54, works or deals in lace: 2. 5. 71. 3. 4. 39.

+Larum, n., alarm: 4. 2. 101. Instruct, V., tto appoint ; to Lasting, n., endurance : 2. 5. 45. guide : 4. 4. I.

Latine, v., to interlard with Latin : Instrument, n., (Law), a writing 2. 6. 26, 53.

which gives formal expression to Leash, n., a brace and a half, or a legal act, or agreement, as set of three, originally used in bonds and wills: 3. I. 32.

sporting language: 3. 2. 78. Insult, v.i., tto vaunt, to triumph: Leg, in phrase to make a leg, to

bow: 2. I. MN., 5. 4. 244. Intelligence, n., tidings (a state Lie (lye), v. i., fto lodge, to term used in affectation) : 2. 5. dwell : 1. 2. 57, 59, 4. 2. 137, 5.

1. 75. +Intergatorie, n., tform of inter- +Linnener, n., a linen draper;

rogatory: 4. 7. 16; pl. (Law), shirt-maker; dealer in linen material and pertinent ques- goods : 2. 5. 70, 4. 1. 105. tions in writing, to necessary Lock, n., a lovelock : 3. 5. 70, 4. points exhibited for the examination of witnesses or persons who Looke, v. i., to stare; to glare: are to give testimony in the case. 3. 4. 41, 4. 3. 3.

3. 7. 16.

72, 3. 3. 86.

6. 39.

Loose, V., to lose, to waste : 1. I.

67, 1. 2. 4. Lotium, n., lotion : 3. 5. 88.

Century does not recognize the

form. Lurch, V., Ito swindle, cheat

(with a dir. obj. of the person): 5. 4. 227.

M., abbreviation for Master: 3.

6. 79.

Madrigall, n., a mediaeval poem

or song, amorous, pastoral, or descriptive: 2. 3. 23, 138, 2. 4.

94, 4. 5. 123. Make, v., fto do; to be occupied

or busied with: 4. 3. 5, 4. 7. I; to make possible the fact that:

Dedic. 1o. Managing, n., management, di

rection: 4. 5. 84. Mandrake, n., mandragora, a

poisonous plant, which acts as emetic, purgative, and narcotic: 4. 2. 91. [OE. draca from L.

draco.] Cf. note. Mankind, adj., mannish : 5.4. 22. +Mannage, N., management : 3.

4. 2. Mannikin, n., a little man, a

pigmy: 1. 3. 26. +Mar'l, n. (marvel), a wonder:

3. I. 43. Marshall, V., to usher: 1. 3. 53. +Mary, interj., the name of the

Virgin Mary, involved in oaths; marry; indeed :

I. 1. 152, passim. Master, n., a title of address now

Measure, n., moderation : 4.1.51. Meat, n., tfood : PROL. 17, 27,

1. 3. 56, 2. 6. 35, 3. 3. 64, 81. Melancholique, adj., Igloomy,

melancholy: 2. 4. 139, 148. Melancholy, n., melancholia, in

sanity: 4. 4. 58. Mercer, n., a dealer in cloths,

esp. silks : 2. 2. 112. Minion, n., ta favorite, a darling :

3. 5. 31. Minister, n., agent, servant: 4.

4. 7. Moneth, n. (tform of month) :

2. 2. 138, 2. 4. 40. More, adj., tgreater (in sense of

size or importance) : 1. 2. 20,

3. 7. 19. Motion, n., ta puppet ; a puppet

show: 3. 4. 38; tendency of desire or passion : 2. 5. 28 ;

a proposal : 4. 5. 236. Mouthe, n., a servant: 3. 5. 33.

A sense not recognized by the

dictionaries. Mulot, v., tto punish : 3. 4. 17. Muse, v. i., fto wonder, to be

astonished : 2. 3. 100, 3. 4. 2.' Mushrome, n. (mushroom), an

upstart: 2. 4. 153. Mutine, v. i., to mutiny: 1. 3. 20.

Neat, adj., tspruce, over-nice :

1. I. 92. Neatnesse, n., over-niceness,

changed to Mister: 1. I. 178, 1. 2. 5, passim; abbrev. to M.:

3. 6. 79; to Mr.: 3. 2. 21. Matter, n., material (used of

persons): 4. I. 59; question under discussion : 5. 3. 17, 32, 5. 4. 245.

finicalness: 4. 6. 30. Neere, adv., comp. of near: 4. I.

68. Neesing, n., tsneezing [OE.

niesen]: 4. 1. 9. Nest, n., a series or set of articles,

generally of diminishing size:

4. I. 21. Nicke, in phrase to set i' the nicke,

to bet at the right moment in a card game): 4. 4. 166.

5. 3. 106.

Note, n., sign, symbol : 4. 4. 38. 71; endowment, quality: 2. 5. Noyse, n., ta company of mu- 28.

sicians, a band: 3. 3. 84, 3. 7. 2. Partake, v., to have a share in, Number, n., measure, rhythm: to share (used tr.): 1. 3. 22, 4. I. 51.

4. 4. 5. Number, v., to summon : Dedic. Party, n., particular person (now II.

only vulgar): 2. 4. 61, 2. 6. 14.

Peitronell, n., a hand-firearm Obnoxious, adj., liable, subject : shorter than the harquebus, but

2. 2. 66; offensive : 3. 2. 3. longer than the pistol, introObstancy, n.,tsubstance, essence: duced in the 16th century. It

was fired by a match-lock, Of, adv., toff: 4. 5. 144; prep., wheel-lock, or other appliance;

concerning : 3.6.16. Cf. Abbott, was fired resting against the § 174.

breast, hence its name. The Offer, v. i. (in the phrase to offer soldier protected himself from

at), to essay, to attempt : 4. I. the recoil with a pad: 4. 5. 45.

IIO. On, prep., of: 4. 1. 14. Cf. Perfumer, n., one whose trade Abbott, $ 181.

was making and selling perOnce, adv., +at once : 4. 5. 121; fumes and cosmetics : 2. 2. 110. once for all: 4. 5. 36.

Perruke, n., an artificial wig: Open, adj., free-spoken : 1. 3. I; 1. I. 16, 119, 132, 4. 2. 89.

frank, ingenious: 5. 1. 79, 80. + Perseuer, v. i. (+form of perseOpen, v., to expound, interpret: vere) : 4. 1. 77.

Perswade, v.i., to use persuasion : Or, n. (Her.), the metal gold, 2. 2. 60; v. t., 5. 4. 6.

often represented by a yellow Pest'ling, ppl. adj., pounding, color, and in engraving con- pulverizing: 3. 3. 103. This ventionally by dots upon a white word is apparently coined by ground : 1. 4. 41. [L. aurum, Jonson, as no other example OF. or, ME. or.)

exists. Or so. Cf. so.

Petarde, n., an engine of war used Ordinance, n., t cannon, ord- to blow in a door, gate, &c., nance: 1. 2. 16.

consisting of a half-cone of Other, adv., Iotherwise : 1. 3. 5. thick iron filled with powder Cf. Abbott, $ 12.

and ball, fastened to a plank ; Other, pro. sing. for pl. others : the latter provided with hooks 1. I. 43, 2. 3. 90.

to be attached to the door or

gate. Use of bombs made the Pageant, n., a play or spectacle petard obsolete: 4. 5. 219, 222.

performed on a movable float Pewterer, n., a worker in pewter : or car: 3. 2. 60.

I. I. 160. Parget, v. i., fto paint; daub Phant'sie, n., fantasy, caprice, with paint: 5. 2. 36.

whim : 1. 2. 52. Part, n., tact; action : 2. 4. 49, Physicke (Physique), n. (+forms

5. 3. 86.

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