網頁圖片
PDF
ePub 版

5. 4. 182.

word under I; the noun some- between meals; sweetmeats, times meant the person attempt- dessert: 1. 3. 41. ing murder.

Barbary, n., ta Barbary horse, Assure, v., tto secure or make a barb: 4. 1. 102.

sure the possession or reversion Bare, adj. or adv., Iwith head of; to convey property by deed :

uncovered : 3. 3. 75.

Bason, n., basin : 3. 5. 86. At, prep., to: 3. 5. 73, 74. Cf. Bate, v., to make a reduction in, Abbott, § 143.

to lessen: 3. 4. 45. Attachment, n. (Law), taking Battell, n., a fight between two into the custody of the law the

persons: 4. 2. 108. person or property of one already Baud, n., pander : 2. 2. 131. Both before the court, or of one whom masc. and fem. before 17th it is sought to bring before it; century; after that time always a writ for the accomplishment fem. Of uncertain origin ; of this purpose : 4. 7. 16.

earliest example is in Piers Attone, v. +(tr. with a personal Plowman, 1362, where one MS.

object), to set at one, to bring reads Bawdstrot. into accord : 4. 5. 163.

Bayes, n., the crown of laurel or Audacious, adj., confident, in- bay worn as a reward by contrepid : 2. 5. 32.

queror or poet, used figuratively tAuthenticall, adj., real, actual, for fame: PROL. 3. genuine : 3. 2. 28.

Beare-ward, n., the keeper of a Author, n., tinstigator, autho- bear, who leads it about to exrizer, prompter : 1. 2. 9, II.

hibit its tricks : 1. I. 176, 4. 2. Azure, n. (Her.), the blue color 109.

in coats of arms, represented in Because, conj., tin order that: engraving by horizontal lines: 4. 5. 274. 1. 4. 41.

+Bedpheere, n., a bedfellow :

2. 5. 49. [OE. gefera, comBait, n., refreshment, slight re- panion, fellow.]

past: 1. 3. 43. Century gives Beg, v. +(tr. with impersonal this word as still colloquial in direct obj.), to beg a person provincial England.

meant to petition the Court Balle, n., a spherical piece of of Wards (established by soap: 3. 5. 75.

Henry VIII and suppressed Band, n., the neck-band or collar under Charles II) for the cus

of a shirt, originally used to tody of a minor, heiress, or make it fit closely, later ex- idiot, as feudal superior or as panded for ornamentation. In having interest in the matter : 16th century synonymous with 2. 2. 45, 4. 7. 5.N.E. D. does ruff, in the 17th with the drooping not recognize the use of the collar which gradually took the impers. dir. obj., but it seems to place of its stiffly - starched, have been common.

'stand-up' predecessor: 3.1.42. 4. 7. 5. Banquet, n., ta slight repast Bell-man, n., a man employed to

Cf, note,

go about the streets at night as Very common c. 1600; still used a watchman : 1. I. 166.

as an historical term.] Benefit, n., Ikindness, favor : Brief, adj., tto be brief means to 2. 4. 20, 22, 3. 7. 30.

be expeditious or hasty : 5.4.29. Beshrew, v., used only as here Briefly, adv., tsoon, at once :

in the imperative with the force 3. 2. 18, 4. 5. 237, 5. 3. 76. of an imprecation,‘Evil befall': +Brown baker, n., a baker of 2. 6. 29.

brown bread : 2. 5. 120. Biggen, n., a child's cap. Here Buckle, v., tto fasten up in any figuratively as the sign of

way : 1. I. 146. infancy: 3. 6. 82.

By, adv., near, ready-in comBlanket, v., to toss in a blanket mand stand by : 2. 1. 29, 4. 5.

as a rough punishment: 5. 4. 302. 13.

By and by, adv., tat once, imBodies, n., a variant of bodice mediately: 4. 5. 345.

from the original plur. a pair of bodies, meaning 'a pair of +Calliuer, n., a light kind of stays'. Formerly always treated

Cf. note. as a plur. even with spelling Carpet, n., ta thick fabric worked bodice, and originally referring into covers for tables, beds, &c. : to the part of a dress covering 4. 5. 253. the body as distinct from the Carriage, n., Imanner of conarms: 2. 5. 77.

musket: 4. 5. 110.

ducting oneself socially: 2. 5. Boy, n., page: 1. I. I. Cf. note.

51, 5. 3. 51. Brake, n. Cf. note, 4. 6. 27. Cast, n., the number of hawks Brasier, n., one who works in cast off at a time; a couple : brass : 1. I. 158.

4. 4. 192. Braue, adj., Esplendid, capital: Cast, v., tto anticipate, forecast : 2. 2. 24, 4. 5. 231, 5. 4. 59.

4. 5. 214. Brauely, adv., Iworthily, well: Casuist, n., a theologian or other 4. 1. 12, 5. 3. 12.

person who studies and resolves Brauery, n., tgallant, beau : 1. I. cases of conscience, or questions

78, 1. 3. 30, 2. 3. 55, 2. 4. 120; of duty and conduct : 4. 5. 4.

ostentation, finery: 4. 6. 6. Catch, n., song, originally a short Brauo, n., a bravado, a swagger- composition for three or more

ing fellow: 3. 6. 112. [Ital. voices, which sing to the same bravo. Earliest English usage, melody, the second singer be1597. N.E.D.]

ginning the first line as the first Bricke-bat, n., a fragment of goes on to the second, and so brick: 2. I. 12.

with each successive singer : Bride-ale, n., a wedding-feast :

3. 4. 1o. 2. 6. 32; brideale : 3. 6. 73; Censure, v. i., fto judge ; to give bridall: 4. 5. 48. [OE. bryd- an opinion: Dedic. 16. ealo, literally 'wedding-ale'. Certificate, n. (Law), a writing The analytical form with the made in any court, and properly stress on the ale never died out. authenticated, to give notice demning; tin pl.: 4. 5. 68. Comely, adj., appropriate, proper: Content, ppl. adj., agreed, used 2. I. 21.

that a fact has or has not taken Comment, n. 'Sometimes it is place : 4. 7. 15.

taken to be a lie or feigned Chance-medlee, n. (Law), acci- tale' (Bullokar, 1616; also in

dent or casualty not purely acci- Cockeram, 1623). [L. comdental, but of a mixed charac- mentum]: 5. 4. 55. ter, chiefly in manslaughter by Comming, ppl. adj., tinclined to chance-medley, for which later meet advances, complaisant: writers use chance-medley itself. 5. I. 78. -Cowel : 3. 5. 117.

Commoditie, n., ta quantity of Charge, n., theed, attention : 2. goods sold on credit to a person

2. 98; pl. expense : 5. 4. 209. wishing to borrow money from + China house, n., a place where a usurer, and resold immediately

Chinese merchandise was ex- for some cash at a lower price : hibited: 1. 3. 38, 4. 3. 24. Cf. 1. 4. 69, 2. 5. 118. note, 1. 3. 38.

Companion, n., tfellow, used as China-woman, n., the owner or a term of contempt: 2. 2. 19,

keeper of a china-house: 1.4.26. 5. 4. 5, 154. +Christen-name, n., Christian Compendious, adj., texpeditious, name, the name given at

direct: 2. I. I. christening : 1. 3. 45.

Composition, n., t constitution of Circumstance, n., Iceremony, body : 2.5.17; ta mutual agree

ado: 2. 5. 55 ; pl. details: 5. 3. ment or arrangement between 44.

two parties, a contract : 5. 4. Citation, n. (Law), the production 209.

of or reference to the text of Conceipt, n., tpersonal or private acts of legislatures, treatises, opinion: 4. 5. 264. &c., in order to support pro

Conceited, ppl. adj., tclever, positions advanced : 4. 7. 15. witty: 2. 5. 57 +Citie-wire, n., a

of Conceiue, V., to grasp with the fashion: PROL. 23.

mind (of a thing I): 2. 5. 5, 9, Citterne, n., #cithern, an instru- 12, passim.

ment of the guitar kind, strung Condition, n., tcharacter, diswith wire, played with a plec- position : 2. 5. 15; provision: trum, very popular in 16th and

2. 4. 45, 137. 17th centuries; modern zither : Confound, V., to discomfit in

argument, to silence: 1. 2. 60. ||Clogdogdo, n. Cf. note, 4. 2.75. Conscience, n., consciousness, Coacted, ppl. adj., enforced, internal conviction : 2. 5. 58. compulsory: 3. 4. 54.

Consent, n., Iagreement, accord : Coate, n. (Her.), coat-of-arms,

4. 6. 103. escutcheon : 1. 4. 40.

Contayne, V., fto keep under Collier, n., a man engaged in the control (of the mind): 5. 3. 49. coal trade; a term of reproach : Contempt, n., action of con

woman

3. 5. 62.

in exclamations: 2.4.158,5.4.16.

3. 5. 116.

I.

Content, v., fto please, delight: Cunning woman, n., tfortunePROL. 2.

teller, conjurer: 2. 2. 127. Conuayance, n. (Law), the trans- Curious, n., tcareful, studious:

fer of the title of property from 4. I. 38. [L. curiosus.] one person to another : 2. 2.

142. Conuiction, n. (Law), that legal Damasque, n., a rich cloth, manu

proceeding of record which factured originally at Damascus, ascertains the guilt of the party very fashionable in James l's and upon which the sentence time: 3. 2. 68. or judgment is founded : 4. 7. Decline, v., tto avert: 2. 2. 101. 16.

Delicate, adj., tdainty, fine (of Correspondence, n., + relation horses) : 1. 4. 5, 2. 4. 103, 3. I.

between persons or communi- 24. ties; usually qualified as good, Demand, v., tto ask (dir. obj. friendly, &c. : 3. 3. 87.

the person, ind. obj. the thing): Cosen, n., a relative (cousin) : 3. 2. 22.

2. 2. 103 ; cosin, 3. 2. 18, passim. Desperate, adj., tirretrievable, Cosen, v., to cheat: 2. 2. 43, 86, irreclaimable : 2. 5. 50. passim.

Desperately, adv., excessively: +Costard-monger, n., a street 4. 2. 46. vender of fruits :

1. 155

Deuis'd, ppl. adj., invented, con(costard, apple).

trived: 2. 2. 148. Countenance, n., bearing, de- Diet, n., tboard: 2. 5. 108. meanor: 4. 6. 76.

Discontentment, n., displeaCourse, n., tcharge, onset; bout, sure, vexation : 4. 4. 181. encounter : 4. 2. 9, 145.

Discouer, V., Ito reveal, make ||Courtlesse, adj., wanting in known : 1. I. IIO, 121,5. 4. 250;

courtliness : 2. 5. 30. N. E. D. to find out: 3. 3. 7. and Century have no record of Discourse, n., tconversational the word elsewhere used.

power: 5. I. 40; conversation: Courtling, n., a gentleman of the 2. I. 4, 2. 4. 86, passim.

court : 4. 1. 131. An unusual Discourse, V., Ito tell, narrate word to which Jonson always (with direct obj. of the thing): attaches a disparaging meaning.

4. 5. 246. Cf. Cyn. Rev. 5. 2, p. 316, Epic Disease, n., fault: I. 1. 57; grams 52, 72.

eccentricity : 1. I. 149, 3. 6. 66. Crowne, n., an English coin, gold Disfurnish, V., to deprive of:

or silver, worth five shillings, 4. 6. 48. first coined by Henry VIII in Dispence, v. i., to excuse, pardon gold, in imitation of the French (used with the prep. with): écu au soleil of Louis XII or 1. 4. 12. Francis I. Since Edward VI Doctrine, n., +discipline; lesson, it has existed in silver : 1.4. 57.

precept: 2. I. 28. Cu er, n., trouble, distress : + Dor, n., scoff, mockery; used as 5. 4. 189.

a light imprecation : 2. 3. 45 ; auricularia, so called from the actions, is the mode of obtaining notion that it penetrates into the debt or damages or other the head through the ear : thing recovered by the judg5. 4. 7.

5. 69.

to give the dor to, to make Epithalamium, n., a nuptial song game of: 3. 3. 26.

or poem in praise of the bride Dote, n., natural gift or endow- and bridegroom, and praying

ment (usually pl.): 2. 3. 100. for their prosperity: 3.6.91, 93. Doublet, n., ta close-fitting body- Erection, n., texaltation : 4.6.79.

garment, with or without sleeves, Errandst,adj.(tvariant of arrant), worn by men from the 14th to thorough-going, unmitigated : 4. the 18th centuries; rarely applied to women's garments Estate, n., ta condition of existof the same sort: of men's, 2. 2. ence, physical or social: 3. 4.

68, 3. 1. 53; of women's, 3. 2. 76. 47, 4. 5. 28, passim. Dressing, n., artificial aid to good +Estrich, n., ostrich : 4. 1. 50.

looks ; cosmetics, &c.: 1. 1.105, Example, n., precedent: Dedic. 6. 4. I. 37, 104.

Except against, to take exception Drone, V., tto smoke : 4. 1. 66. to: 5. 4. 129. Cf. note.

Excursion, n., digression, devia

tion (upon words): 5. 3. 75. Eare-wig, n., an insect, Forficula Execution, n. (Law), in civil

ment; it is either for the plaintiff Eater, n., ta menial, servant: or defendant. For the plaintiff 3. 5. 33.

upon a judgment in debt, the Election, n., discrimination : 4.7. execution is for the debt and 47.

damages, for the goods, or | Elephantiasis, n., a name given their value, and costs : 2. 5. 106,

to various kinds of cutaneous diseases which cause the skin Exercise, n., a recreative employto resemble an elephant's hide: ment, a pastime: 4. 4. 103. 5. 3. 184.

Exhibition, n., maintenance, Enable, v., tto empower, qualify: support: 3. 1. 59 (cf. late L. ex

hibitio et tegumentum, food and +Engle, n., catamite : 1. I. 25. raiment). Ensigne, n., #token, sign : 3. 6. Expect, v. i., fto wait: 5. 3. 145; 72.

v. t., fto wait for, await: 5. 3. 37. Entire, adj., devoted, intimate: Expresse, v. i, for reflex, use, to 2. 4. 43

put one's thoughts into words: Entreat, v., to invite: 1. 1. 176,

1.4. 8, 3. 3. 114, 4. 5.47, passim ; Extemporall, adj., textempointreat: 2. 5. 2, 4. 4. 76. This raneous : 2. 3. 10. word Jonson uses constantly in the exaggerated speech of the +Facinorous, adj., infamous, vile: court.

2. 2. 54. This very common Entreaty, n., treception, enter- word in 17th-century usage tainment: PROL. 11.

Cooper defines as 'full of

4. 5. 18.

5. 4. 218.

3. 2. 26.

« 上一頁繼續 »