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Death and]
2 CORINTHIANS.

. (judgment.

the selfsame thing is God, who also CHAP. V.

hath given unto us the earnest of the

Spirit. FOR we know that if our earthly 6 Therefore we are always congI house of this tabernacle were dis- dent, knowing that, whilst we are at solved, we have a building of God, an home in the body, we are absent from house not made with hands, eternal in the Lord : the heavens.

7 (For we walk by faith, not by 2 For in this we groan, earnestly sight:) desiring to be clothed upon with our 8 We are confident, I say, and house which is from heaven :

willing rather to be absent from the 3 If so be that being clothed we body, and to be present with the shall not be found naked.

Lord. 4 For we that are in this taber- 9 Wherefore we labour, that, whenacle do groan, being burdened : not ther present or absent, we may be acfor that we would be unclothed, but cepted of him. clothed upon, that mortality might be 10 For we must all appear before swallowed up of life.

the judgment seat of Christ; that 5 Now he that hath wrought us for every one may receive the things done

EXPOSITION—Chap. IV. Continued. The apostles preached not to advance their and instruments of eternal life and sal. fame, their interest, or their authority; vation.' but as the faithful servants of Christ, solely The apostle then states what it was that to promote the glory of their Master and supported him and his colleagues under all the salvation of mankind. For our parts their trials- it was looking from things (as if he had said), we are but frail and temporal to thiogs eternal; and weighing carthen vessels, of little value and of less against their present momentary afilicstrength; yet, worthless as we are, to us tions, a vast, accumulating, and eternal is committed the invaluable treasure of weight of glory. the gospel; and we, therefore, in the midst (though continually exposed to

........ "From dreams on earth ve more, death) of dangers and of enemies, are And wake through death to endless life above." preserved that we may be to you the means

Parall.

NOTES.

CHAP. V. Ver. ). If our earthly house of this tabernacle.-The Hebrew term for house"(Beth) is of very extensive use. It seems used for a tent, Gen. xxvii, 15 ; compare Heb. xi.9. Mr. Harmer says. * The Persians call a richly ornamented tent a house of gold.” Mackn. renders this verse, “ When our house, which is a tent, is destroyed." So the Greek particle (can) is used for when, John xii. 32; 1 John iii. 2. We also prefer " destroyed ” to dissolved," because the word strictly means to take or throw down, or pall to pieces, which is pe. culiarly applicable to a tent."

Ver. 2. For in this (tabernacle or tent] ne groan earnestly; desiring to be rlothed. To be is clothed with a bouse," seems a barsh figure to us, but is qnite in the Jewish taste; the Book Zohar, on Exod. xxiv. 18, says, Moses was clothed with the cloud : “ so we read in the book of Revelations, of an angel 4 clothed with a cloud," and of a woman « clothed with the sun.” (Rev. x. l: xii. 1.) The word “house," is also used for any part of dress: a veil is the house of the face;" a grote, the "mouse of the topgers." The sacred writers also apply the term clothed, as we do habit; so they speak of being clothed with humility, or

with shame (1 Pet. v. 5; Ps. XXXV. 26), moches we talk of a habit of virtue and of vice : and not only so, but they speak of being clothed with righteousness," or with trembling" (Job xxix. 14; Ezek. xxvi. 16); and (perhaps the boldest metaphor of all the neck of the war horse is described As being clotbed with thunder.” (Job xxxix. 19. See ag interestiuz Note in Townsend's New Test Arr, vol. ii. p. 347.

Ver. 5. The selfsame thing.-Mackn." This very (desire)."--The earnest of the Spirit-See chap i. 22.

Ver. 6. Whilst we are at home in the body, are absent-Mackn.“ from home”-frou tkr Lerd; i, e, while at our enrthly, we are necessarily fres our heavenly home.

Ver. 8. Absent froin the body, and to be present with the Lord.-Mackn." From home out of the body; and to be at home with the Lord."

Ver 9. Welabour.-Mary. “Endeavour." Macka.

Strive earnestly." Doddr.“ Make it the heigbt al our ambition." . Whether present or ancat.

Mackn. Whether it home or from home We may be accepted of him.Macka." acceptabie to him."

Arguments to]

CHAP. V.

[induce repentance. in his body, according to that he hath 11 | Knowing therefore the terror done, whether it be good or bad. (E) of the Lord, we persuade men ; but

EXPOSITION.
CHAP. V.

ferred from our Lord's promise to the peni(E) Ver. 1-10. T'he desire of immor- tent thief, when on the cross; on which turn tality, the expectation of a future judg- also to our Expos. of Lukexxiii. 39–43; as ment, and the practical influence of these also from the dying words of Stephen, Acts doctrines. In the opening of this chapter vii. 29. 4. That the consideration of this inthe apostle draws a beautiful comparison termediate state was a great support to Paul between the feeble body which we here himself, is abundantly evident from his inhabit, and which he compares to a tent desiring tu “ depart and be with Christ," -which is a temporary erection easily re- which would he very unaccountable if he moved ; and the permanent babitation did not hope to meet with him till the the everlasting mansions which our Saviour resurrection, which it is evident from his is gone to prepare for all his people. This own writings he did not expect for many tent of human flesh is (as we may say) far years, if not any centuries, to come. See from weather-proof; it is liable to cracks, 2 Thess. ii. 1-12. Tbis doctrine receives and rents, or (to drop the metaphor) it is farther confirmation from chap. xii. 1-4; exposed to a variety of mortal ills, as well Phil. i. 20—23; 1 Peter i. 8, 9; Rev. ii. 7, as to the attacks of cruel enemies. We, vi. 9. And there are many passages in therefore, “groan, being burthened," not the devotional parts of the Old Testament, merely from a desire to rid ourselves of already noticed, which plainly indicate a "this mortal coil," but from a desire to like desire to be absent from the body and enter into that immortal residence which present with the Lord,” as Psalm lxxxiv. is provided for us in another world-where- 11, &c. into Christ, our fore-runner, is for us en The practical influence of this doctrine, tered.

in exciting to diligence and activity, is a We here pause a few moments to remark strong presumption of its truth, which may upon the evidence which this chapter af be farther strengthened by considering fords of an intermediate state between the benumbing consequences of the condeath and judgment. Dr. Sam. Clarke, in trary hypothesis. Try the effect of telling a judicious discourse from this text re- a wicked man that he shall be puuished at marks-“1. That we must all shortly bc the end of a thousand years or more, and absent, or separate from the body. 2. That will it not harden him in sin? This is this state is not a state of absolute inseu. Dot the way in which the apostles preached sibility; but, 3. to good men, a state of the “terror of the Lord," in order to pergreat happiness, a being present with the suade men to repentance. (ver. 11.) Lord. 4. The consideration of this inter To that end the apostles urged the most mediate happiness is a great comfort and important doctrine of a future judgment; support against the fear of death, we are and, instead of placing at a great and unconfident, and willing rather to be absent certain distance that awful period, hring from the body, &c. 5. This intermediate it near : “ The day of the Lord is at hand" state, though a state of happiness, is by no -" The judge standeth before the door." ineans equal to that bappiness which good (Rom. xiii. 3; James v. 9; Heb, ix. 27.) men shall be possessed of after the resur. And this they might do with the greatest rection." (See Robinson's Claude, vol. ii. propriety, since the day of death is thus p. 397, Note 1.)

near, which we have reason to believe fixes Of these propositions we shall here offer the happiness or misery of every indivisome confirmatory proofs. 1. That there dual of mankind, by a scrutiny equally is an interovediate state is clear ; for, when decisive, though not equally publie, with we are "absent from the body," we are the last judgment. Whether the passage present with the Lord;" apd, 2. that it is now before us (ver. 10) refers to the former not a state of mere insensibility is most or latter event, we presume not to decide. evident, from the parable of the rich man The one will fix the other : for the deci. and Lazarus, on wbich see our Expos. of sions of the Supreme Judge admit neither Luke xvi. 19-31. 3. That it is a state of of revision nor appeal. happiness to good men may be safely in.

NOTES. Ver. 10. Judgment seat.- Doddr. and Macka. Ver. 11. The terror of the Lord--that is, luister "Thbugal,'' Sce Matt. xxv. 31–46.

rible judgments against siu. See Heb, X. 31.

Death and]
2 CORINTHIANS.

. (judgment.

the selfsame thing is God, who als CHAP. V.

hath given unto us the earnest of the

Spirit. FOR we know that if our earthly 6 Therefore we are always cons. + house of this tabernacle were dis- dent, knowing that, whilst we are at solved, we have a building of God, an home in the body, we are absent from house not made with hands, eternal in the Lord : the heavens.

7 (For we walk by faith, not by 2 For in this we groan, earnestly sight:) desiring to be clothed upon with our 8 We are confident, I say, and house which is from heaven :

willing rather to be absent from the 3 If so be that being clothed we body, and to be present with the shall not be found naked.

Lord. 4 For we that are in this taber- 9 Wherefore we labour, that, wie nacle do groan, being burdened : not ther present or absent, we may be a for that we would be unclothed, but cepted of him. clothed upon, that mortality might be 10 For we must all appear befa swallowed up of life.

the judgment seat of Christ ; 14 5 Now he that hath wrought us for every one may receive the things da

EXPOSITION—Chap. IV. Continued. The apostles preached not to advance their and instruments of eternal life and a same, their interest, or their authority; vation.' but as the faithful servants of Christ, solely The apostle then states what it was to promote the glory of their Master and supported him and his colleagues ainda the salvation of mankind. For our parts their trials-it was looking from (as if he had said), we are but frail and temporal to thiogs eternal ; and weig earthen vessels, of little value and of less against their present momentary strength; yet, worthless as we are, to us tions, a vast, accumulating, and even is committed the invaluable treasure of weight of glory. the gospel; and we, therefore, in the midst (though continually exposed to

.........“From dreams on earth we more, death) of dangers and of enemies, are And wake through death to endless life abon preserved that we may be to you the means

NOTES.

CHAP. V. Ver.). If our earthly house of this tabernacle.-The Hebrew term for house" (Beth) is of very extensive use. It seems used for a tent. Gen, xxvii. 15; compare Heb. xi.9. Mr. Harmer says, " The Persians call a richly ornamented tent a house of gold.” Mackn. renders this verse, “ When our house, which is a tent, is destroyed.” So the Greek particle (can) is used for when, John xii, 32; 1 John iii. 2. We also prefer “ destroyed ” to dissolved," because the word strictly means to take or throw down, or pill to pieces, which is pe. culiarly applicable to a tent."

Ver. 2. For in this [tabernacle or tent) ne groan earnestly; desiring to be clothed.--To be is clothed with a house," seems a barsh figure to us, but is quite in the Jewish taste; the Booh Zohar, on Exod. xxiv. 18, says, Moses was “clothed with the cloud :" so we read in the book of Revelations, of an angel “ clothed with a cloud," and of a woman “clothed with the sun.” (Rev. x. 1: xij. I.) The word "house," is also used for any part of dress: a veil is the house of the face:"A glove, the house of the fingers.” The sacred writers also apply the term clothed, as we do habit; so they i speak of being clothed with humility, or

with shame (1 Pet. v. 5; Ps. XXXV. 26). 23
we talk of a habit of virtue and of vice:
only so, but they speak of being “ clotrend
righteousness," or with trembling" (Jab
Ezek. xxvi. 16); and (perhaps the boldest w
of all the neck of the rar-horse is descr:
being clothed with thunder.” (Job Tit
See an interesting Note in Townsend's Mer
Arr, vol. ii. p. 347.

Ver. 6. The self same thing.-Macka. Tu
(desire)."--The earnest of the Spirit-
i. 22.

Ver. 6. Whilst we are at home in the time are absent-Mackn." from home”-frontal i. e, while at our enrthly, we are necessary our heavenly home.

Ver. 8. Absent froin the body, and to be with the Lord.-Mackn. From home out body; and to be at home with the Lord."

Ver 9. We labour-Marg. Endeavoar." “ Strive earnestly." Doddr. * Make it the our ambition." . Whether presenter -Mackp. Whether at home or from a We may be accepted of him, Macka. to him."

guments to]

CHAP. V.

[induod repentance, his budy, according to that he hath 11 Knowing therefore the terror ne, whether it be good or bad. (E) of the Lord, wo persuado mon; but

EXPOSITION.
CHAP. V.

ferred from our Lord's promise to the peni E) Ver. 1-10. The desire of immor- tent thief, when on the cross , on which turn ty, the expectation of a future judg- also to our Expos. of Lukexxiii. 39--13, 18 at, and the practical influence of these also from the dying words of Stephen, Acts Frines.- In the opening of this chapter vii. 29. 1. That the consideration of the in

apostle draws a beautiful comparison termediate atau was a great support to Paul ween the feeble body which we here himself, is abundantly evident from baie abit, and which be compares t a tent desiring to “ depart and be with Christ,"

hich is a temporary erection easily re- which would be very unaccountable if he -ed; and the permanent babitation- did not hope to meet with him will the everlasting mansions wbich our Saviour resurrection, which it is evident from his one to prepare for all his people. This own writings he did not expect for many of human flesh is (as we may say) far years, if not many centuries, un come, we

weather-proof; it is liable to cracks, 2 Tbém, ji. l-12. This doctrine posives rents, or (to drop the metaphor) it is farther confirmation from chap 11, 1-4 osed to a variety of mortal ills, as well Pbil. 1. 20-23 ; 1 Peur i,%, 9', kw, 1.7, to the attacks of croel enemies. We, vi. 9. And there are many engem in refore, “groan, being burtbened," not the devotional parts of the Om Textmut, rey from a desire to rid onrselves of already soticed, which plainly indian # Dis mortal ooil,” but from a desire to like desire to be" ahant from the body and er into that immortal residence which present with the ord," ** Palma liust, torided for us in another world-abere. 11, be. Christ, our fore-runder, is for us en The practical influence of this own ,

is exciting diligence a winny, to Se bere paese a few moments to remark strong presumytunod na twth, wloset wwwy se the event which this chapter of be further strengthen try empierw

the bucumbag einum

hy sinh azad gadget. Dr. Esu. Clarke, istrary wy s e, lry then stunt will c ss discourse in this test s 2 wekil was dat hul by puudus

- L Tias se pued borty by those out a shame year wani, mal, se separate friss the budy. 2. Trat di kerfisins doen in ' Taajs #

us that we will syna pin

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Ministers ambassadors) 2 CORINTHIANS. (of Jesus Christ; we are made manifest unto God; and yet now henceforth know we him no I trust also are made manifest in your more. consciences,

17 Therefore if any man be in 12 For we commend not ourselves Christ, he is a new creature : old again unto you, but give you occa- things are passed away; behold, all sion to glory on our behalf, that ye things are become new. may have somewhat to answer them 18 And all things are of God, who which glory in appearance, and not in hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus heart.

Christ, and hath given to us the minis13 For whether we be beside our try of reconciliation ; selves, it is to God; or whether we be 19 To wit, that God was in Christ, sober, it is for your cause.

reconciling the world unto himself, not 14 For the love of Christ constrain- imputing their trespasses unto them; eth us; because we thus judge, that and hath committed unto us the word if one died for all, then were all of reconciliation. dead :

20 Now then we are ambassadors 15 And that he died for all, that for Christ, as though God did beseech they which live should not henceforth you by us: we pray you in Christ's live unto themselves, but unto him stead, be ye reconciled to God. which died for them, and rose again. 21 For he hath made him to be sin

16 Wherefore henceforth know we for us, who knew no sin; that we no man after the flesh: yea, though might be made the righteousness of we have known Christ after the flesh, God in him. (F)

EXPOSITION-Chap. V. Continued, (F) Ver. 11-21. T'he constraining power his glory; and if they were soher and in of the love of Christ, and the doctrine of good earnest, it was for their sakes: "For reconciliation.-St. Paul again assures the (saith he) the love of Christ constraineth Corinthians of his affection towards them, us."-"Whether," says M. Superville (a notwithstanding all the insinuations of his pious Lutheran divine) “we here underenemies. What those insinuations were stand the love of Christ towards us, or we can only gather from his replies : we our love towards him, it is of little im. may fairly infer, however, from ver. 13, portance: we may join both together, for that they brought against him a charge it is certain, that his love and ours mus! similar to that of Festus—that he was mad, meet before our hearts are entirely captithough indeed they were not so polite as the vated by him. It is his love that gives governor, who attributed his derangement birth to a mutual affection in us: it is bis to excessive study. (Acts xxvi. 24.) He fire that enkindles ours."-But the Corintells them, whether he and his coadjutors thians might object, Why tbis zeal in your were beside (or carried beyond) themselves, ministry? It arises froin the conclusion, it was to God, that is, in the promotion of that “if one died for all, then were all

NOTES-Chap. V. Con. Ver. 12. In appearance.-Marg.“ In the face ;** Ver. 18. And all things are of God-The blessed i. e. in outward shew, “ putting (as we say) a good and only Creator : not from man, nor from any earthly face upon their conduct.”

source, Ver. 13. To God.-Mackn. “ For God;" i. e. for Ver. 19. Committed unto us.-Mare. “Put in us." his glory.

So Mackn. An allusion, perhaps, to chap. iv.7. Ver. 14. Then were all dead-i.e. all for whom Ver. 20. Beseecle you .... pray you.-Dr. Mackn. Christ died were under a sentence of condemnation, rejects this supplement, and Mr. Maclaine supplies or it needed not that he should offer an atonement the word " meu.”- in Christ's stead.--"When for them.

Christ was in the world, he pressed this treaty of Ver. 16. Henceforth know we no man after the reconciliation ; and we This apostles and inferior Aesh-i. e. we make no difference in our ministry ministers] rise up in his stead, to urge it still as to Jews or Gentiles, rich or poor, &c., for all are farther." equally guilty, and stand in need of the saine mercy. Ver. 21. Made him to be sin. Doddr. and Macka. See Rom. ii. 10, &c.

render it, “a sin-offering :" and the latter remarks, Ver. 17. He is-Marg. “Let him be"-a new " There are many passages in the Old Testament creature.- Doddr. (" There is) a new creation;" where sin means a sin-offering, as Hos. iv. 8; alsa all things are in such a mind become new.

in the New Testament, Heb. ix. 26-28; xin. 11.

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