Aristotle's Treatise on Poetry, Translated: With Notes on the Translation, and on the Original; and Two Dissertations, on Poetical, and Musical Imitation

封面
W. M'Dowall, 1815 - 415 頁

搜尋書籍內容

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

已選取的頁面

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

熱門章節

第 27 頁 - And ever against eating cares Lap me in soft Lydian airs Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce In notes, with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out, With wanton heed and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony; That Orpheus...
第 169 頁 - English stages, and it is only by a blind confidence in the reputation of Milton that a drama can be praised in which the intermediate parts have neither cause nor consequence, neither hasten nor retard the catastrophe.
第 28 頁 - The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school, The watch-dog's voice that bayed the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind; These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
第 156 頁 - TRAGEDY, as it was anciently composed, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other poems ; therefore said by Aristotle to be of power, by raising pity, and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions, that is, to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirred up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated.
第 143 頁 - Which place we'll make bold with, to call it our Abydus, As the Bankside is our Sestos; and let it not be deny'd us.
第 353 頁 - It was in the power of Richardson alone to teach us at once esteem and detestation, to make virtuous resentment over-power all the benevolence which wit, elegance, and courage, naturally excite ; and to lose at last the hero in the villain.
第 76 頁 - For Tragedy is an imitation, not of men, but of an action and of life, and life consists in action, and its end is a mode of action, not a quality. Now character determines men's qualities, but it is by their actions that they are happy or the reverse.
第 28 頁 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet; The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmur of the water's fall: The water's fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call: The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
第 337 頁 - Angelo has more of the poetical inspiration; his ideas are vast and sublime; his people are a superior order of beings; there is nothing about them, nothing in the air of their actions or their attitudes, or the style and cast of their limbs or features, that reminds us of their belonging to our own species.
第 98 頁 - Metaphor consists in giving the thing a name that belongs to something else; the transference being either from genus to species, or from species to genus, or from species to species, or on grounds of analogy.

書目資訊