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For the want of this moral guardianship, how many buds of prom-a ise have been irretrievably blasted ! how many first trembling steps in the path of error have been taken, which have led finally to the box of the convicted felon, and the dungeon of the condemned criminal! Next to the heaven-instructed philanthropist, who rushes to the rescue of the youthful transgressor, and places him in some house of refuge and industry, where he may retrace his steps, and even find the gate of heaven, I know of no greater benefactor to his species than the parent who preoccupies the mind of his child with good principles, trains it under the influ-zi ences of Christianity, and gives to society a useful member, per-ct haps

os to the world an inestimable blessing. The names of Edwards, Doddridge, Dwight, may serve to indicate how great a gift. an humble, retired, individual mother may bestow not only on her own, but on succeeding generations. In the history of states and nations, the names of Alfred and Washington are richly suggestive, as connected with this subject. Why did they so revere the persons, the presence, the memory, of their mothers? Because of the deep impressions those mothers had made on their minds, and consequently on their characters. There is a sanctity about the companionship of the maternal home, on which the profane must never dare to intrude. How much does the business man, incessantly engaged from morning till night, do for the intellectual, moral, and spiritual welfare of his children ? What is to become of the children of members of Congress, of army and navy officers, of engineers, of judges on their circuits, of California fortune hunters, and numerous other fathers, who are absent from their families a part or the whole of the year, unless the mothers of these growing ones redouble their diligence, patience, and prayers, for the dear objects of their affection? The mother of Dwight (and she was a mother at eighteen) “found time, without neglecting the ordinary cares of her family, to devote herself, with the most assiduous attention, to the instruction of her son, and other numerous children, as they successively claimed her regard.” She laboriously fitted herself for this work. That Mary Dwight

should give herself to the nurture and education of her children · was iinperatively necessary, because her husband “ was so exten

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tempter. Water those plants with thy tears. Fence them round with thy prayers. Eradicate the first sprouting of those malignant weeds that would choke the growth of the healthful plant, and substitute deformity and barrenness for beauty and fertility. Remember the ductility of the youthful mind; the enduring strength of early impressions ; the undecaying nature of the associations formed in the spring-time of life. Mute nature herself leaves the traces of her power on

our memories. Who cannot call to mind the sweet rural walk, the crystal well, the little streamlet that gurgled along, “ kissing each sedge,” and making soft music as it flowed between its green banks; the solemn groves, vocal with the praises of the sweet warblers of the air ; the pure, invig. orating atmosphere of the country” which “ God made ;” the very dew of the morning brushed away by the light and careless footsteps of youth? Moral recollections, too, are often embalmed with equal freshness and conservativeness in the mind. Your children are now treasuring them, insensibly to yourself, but with a certainty that will hereafter rise to greet you with a grateful reward, or meet you with painful retribution.

osteobox PROTECTION and Provision being among the leading elements

SIS of parental obligation, we should guard against the danger of lim

Solo iting these duties to the natural wants of those dependent on us. It is not ordinarily necessary to exhort parents to take care of the body. Most parents live as if this was their chief business. The necessities of time and life seem to exhaust whatever of thought, care, and provision, they spend on their children. They do not rise to the contemplation of the higher wants, the more urgent demands of the soul. Yet what requires more incessant vigilance than the forming mind of a child? Wherever it is, it is always

MAY at school, always learning something. The rich soil beneath our feet is not so vital, so vegetative, so teeming with the activity of seminal life, as the young, tender, opening mind, instinct with the consciousness of immortality. The mind will as certainly find an

od educator, as the plant in your parlor will seek the light, or as the heliotrope will turn its face toward the sun. And it will more naturally turn toward the lurid light of infidelity than the clear and holy beams of Christianity. Hence it should be protected.

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For the want of this moral guardianship, how many buds of prom-a ise have been irretrievably blasted ! how many first trembling steps in the path of error have been taken, which have led finally to the box of the convicted felon, and the dungeon of the condemned criminal! Next to the heaven-instructed philanthropist, who rushes to the rescue of the youthful transgressor, and places him in some house of refuge and industry, where he may retrace his steps, and even find the gate of heaven, I know of no greater benefactor to his species than the parent who preoccupies the mind of his child with good principles, trains it under the influ-i ences of Christianity, and gives to society a useful member, perhaps to the world an inestimable blessing. The names of Edwards, Doddridge, Dwight, may serve to indicate how great a gift an humble, retired, individual mother may bestow not only on her own, but on succeeding generations. In the history of states and nations, the names of Alfred and Washington are richly suggestive, as connected with this subject. Why did they so revere the persons, the presence, the memory, of their mothers? Because of the deep impressions those mothers had made on their minds, and consequently on their characters. There is a sanctity about the companionship of the maternal home, on which the profane must never dare to intrude. How much does the business man, incessantly engaged from morning till night, do for the intellectual, moral, and spiritual welfare of his children ? What is to become of the children of members of Congress, of army and navy officers, of engineers, of judges on their circuits, of California fortunehunters, and numerous other fathers, who are absent from their families a part or the whole of the year, unless the mothers of these growing ones redouble their diligence, patience, and prayers, for the dear objects of their affection? The mother of Dwight (and she was a mother at eighteen) “found time, without neglecting the ordinary cares of her family, to devote herself, with the most assiduous attention, to the instruction of her son, and other numerous children, as they successively claimed her regard." She laboriously fitted herself for this work. That Mary Dwight

should give herself to the nurture and education of her children · was imperatively necessary, because her husband was so exten

same.

their moral characters. Christ would have his followers do the

None of his true followers can despise the poor, when they remember the condition of their Master. The fact that Christ came to eradicate pride and selfishness, and unite all men in one brotherhood, rendered it necessary that he should be in a condition destitute of the advantages of wealth and power. We are called on to admire his wonderful condescension, in exchanging the riches of the universe for a poverty so great that he had not where to lay his head.

A. Ought not Christians to follow their Master's example in this matter?

Mrs. H. Do you mean to ask whether it is the duty of all Christians to be poor?

A. Yes, ma'am.

Mrs. H. It is their duty to be poor in spirit; but not in this world's goods, provided Providence sees fit to bestow those goods

upon them.

A. Christ says it is easier for a came to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. Now it is impossible for a camel to go through the eye of a needle.

Mrs. H. As so, you would infer that it is impossible for a rich man to be saved ?

A. It seems to me, that conclusion would follow from the text.

Mrs. H. It would, if the text were to be interpreted literally; but such was not the design of the Saviour. The expression was a proverbial one, and was well understood by those to whom it was addressed. Christ intended to teach the exceeding difficulty, not the impossibility, of the rich man's salvation. In the same connection, Christ said, “How hard it is for them that trust in riches to enter the kingdom of God !” From that expression it appears that the evil does not lie in riches themselves, but in the effect they are likely to produce on the mind of the possessor.

A. Are there not a great many who think it wrong to be rich? I went with Susan Case to Mr. L-'s one day, and were shown all over the house, and saw all the rich and beautiful furniture ;

and when we came away she said, “I always thought that Mr. L-was a good man.”

Mrs. H. She thought right. He is a very good man.

A. But the manner in which she spoke showed that she thought he could not be a good man, because he was so rich.

Mrs. H. There may be a few persons who entertain the same erroneous view. If they would reflect for a moment, they would see that God designed that there should be wealth in the hands of his people. He has commanded them to be industrious, diligent in business, and has also commanded them to practice frugality. He has forbidden them to waste anything in luxury and vice. Now, if these commands of God are obeyed, riches will be accumulated as a necessary result. It is plain, therefore, that God designed that there should be wealth.

A. I do not see why, if riches make it so difficult for one to be saved.

Mrs. H. How could the sick and suffering poor be relieved, and how could the Bible be sent to the heathen, if every Christian were as poor as Christ was? Besides, our hospitals, asylums, colleges, seminaries, and our benevolent institutions, are the result of wealth-that is, these could never have come into existence, unless there had been previous accumulations of wealth. It is plainly the duty of some persons to devote themselves to the acquisition of property. All have their appointed work. The missionary has his work; the minister at home has his; the merchant has his; the farmer has his. All are to live to the glory of God.);

A. Is it the duty of those who devote themselves to the acquisition of property to give away all that they make ? Mrs. H. I think not. It is their

It is their duty to make suitable provision for their families, and to enjoy, with gratitude, the bounties of God's providence, as he has prospered them. If all men were to give away all they make excepting what is absolutely necessary for their own support, there would be more poverty and suffering in the world than there is now.

A. I do not see why it would be so.

Mrs. H. What would the people who work in the factory here do, if the factory were to stop running?

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