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ations of the crown and to the heard the sun. Prose 9.735 is for the resta Hamnents in The latter portion was further investigarri ad 17. Carais Bosce apaizici is about 1726, resulted in the removal of the diaper frin ar end si disz the sedis ca tre ergibe tippet from the sceptre, and in the ringvery of a kazi the coas api septre, asd dentist ite globe drawn flowing foliaze instead of the fir cuse and with acarth as lains Tbe pin was rerored acanthus leares which hard hitherto $mosted to the Jerusalem (hamber is 11., where John it. B-n-ath the jewelled crowa lay a highly Carter 7 it abi Lale Lis care: il etching in burnished plain gold town, consisting of a soud 173, which may now be cocalend as the best coatinz of composition, which in its turn enprealed round of the pict ire in the edition from which the original crown, drawn, like the septie-brad. , it has just been rescue. The picture bas for the with free and admirably percilled foliaze upon the present been returned to the Jerusalem Chamber, pure gold, which here simply coated the artial and is happiis printed by a large sheet of plate gesso ground laid upon the panel it-lf. This true giass. It is to be haped that the picture may crown was closely punctured with small holes, so soon be restored to its ori inal place in the choir arranged as to form a pattern and repeating the of Westminster Abbey, where in a good open lozenge and oval outlines of the jewels in the light it will be thor'ushly well seen, and, in such circlet of the crown. Puncturings or dorting of a place, become accessible to thousands and thosthis kind, on a plain gilded surface, are considered sands of visitors.

GEORGE SCHARF. to be characteristic of VS. illuminations beloni- 1 National Portrait Gallery, Dec. 1866. ing to the later portion of the fourteenth century, and, indeed, the entire appearance of this picture las very much the eifect of a page taken from some

CATHOLIC PERIODICALS. manuscript volume of that period, and extensively magnified.

I have been rquested to draw up a list of The style of painting, with pale brown shedows Catholie periodical publications in England, Scoton the face, the gilded background, and a profu- land, and Ireland. I beliere the followin: acsion of bright colours and golden borders to the count of them will be found generally correct:drapery, closely resembles the productions of the The earliest Catholic periodical was, I beliere, best artists in Italy at the same perio l.

The Catholic Almanac for the year 1661, and succesThe clumsy and not ancient frame was found to sive years, compiled by Thos. Blount, Esq.of Orlehave encroached largely on the surface of the pic- ton, and e ntinued probably down to the year of his ture, and to have concealed both the sida portions death, 1670. On the accession of James 11., it of the chair and the greater part of the curred step' came out as the Kalendarium Catholicum for the in front of the throne. Unfortunately no date or year 1656, with the significant motto: “ Tristitia inscription has been found on any part of the vestra vertetur in gaudium, Alleluia.” This conpicture.

tained, besides the Feasts, Fasts, Days of AbstiThe practical knowledge and assistance of Mr. nence, Calendar and explanation of the principal Chance, an experienced cilder, were of great ser- Feasts, the following interesting catalogues. First, vice in regard to the difficulties of dealing with | “ of the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen (of the the burnished crown, globe, and stucco coatings Catholic Religion) that were slain in the late warr forming the diaper; whilst Mr. Merritt's extreme in defence of their King and country." Secondly, caution, judicious treatment, and thorough know- “ The names of, such Catholicks whose estates ledge in the application of means to renove these (both real and personal) were sold, in pursuance ma-bes of false colour-without in the slightest of an act made by the Rump, July 16, 1051, for degree affecting tho delicate tempera painting their pretended delinquency: that is, for adhering lying beneath, and in knowing how far to go and to their King.” This was followed by two other when to stop—were of vital importance. Mr. lists of 1652. Finally, “Memorable ObservaRichmond's power of distinguishing false art from tions,” giving the number of years since certain the true, and his jealous protection of all the notable events interesting to Catholies. It apfiner points in the picture as soon as discovered, peared the year following as The Catholic Almawere a guarantee for the perfect success of the rack for the year 1687, containing both the Roman whole; and it is to that gentleman's energy and and English Calendars,—an Explanation of the clearness of views that we are mainly indebted principal holydays of the whole year, with catafor the achievement of such important results. logues of the Popes from St. Peter to this present

The portrait was probably painted from the Innocentius XI., and of the Kings of England and lifo in the year 1300, and appears to have under- Archbishops of Canterbury from the year 600 to gong its grentest changes early in the sixteenth the Reformation. London : Printed by Henry contury; perhaps at the time of the building of Hills, Printer to the King's most excellent Majesty, Henry VII.'s Chapel

, when the diaper was added for his household and chappel, MDCLXXXVII." At and the shape of the crown and sceptro altered. the end of each of these almanacs is a catalogue

of books printed for llenry Hills, and are to be porter was Mr. Charles Butler of Lincoln's Inn. It sold next door to his house in Blackfryers." had a very brief existence, coming to an end in the

The Ordo recitandi for the clergy, and the following September. Laity's Directory began about the year 1761.

The Catholic Vindicator was a weekly paper The earliest Catholic periodical, in the shape in answer to one called The Protestant. It was. of a magazine, appeared towards the close of the entirely written by Mr. Andrews. It began Delast century, about the year 1790. It was called cember 5, 1818, and ended December 4, 1819. The Catholic Magazine. Who was the editor I

Mr. Andrews also tried a weekly newspaper do not know, nor do I know who contributed to called The Catholic Advocate, but it lasted only its pages; but it was, as I remember, a very re nine months. spectable periodical, well conducted, and neatly The Catholic Miscellany began with January, printed. It was of 12mo size, but extended, Í 1822. It was established by Ambrose Cuddon, believe, to no more than three or four volumes. who had come from Bungay to settle in London.

About twenty years later an attempt was made It was printed by Andrews, who had a considerto establish a Catholic Magazine and Review; and able share in its management, till June, 1823. a similar publication was commenced in 1813, but Mr. Cuddon, however, was the responsible editor, both ceased after a few numbers.

and so continued until the end of vol. ix., June, The Orthodox Journal was started in 1813 by 1828. A new series then commenced under the William Eusebius Andrews. Ile had been a editorship of Mr. Sidney. The publication ceased printer in the oflice of the Norfolk Chronicle in altogether in May, 1830. Mr. Cuddon also pubNorwich, but had settled in London as the pro- lished a Catholic Pocket-Book about this time. It fessed “Advocate of Truth.” This journal ap was well got up, and very useful, but was soon peared weekly till the end of 1820, and was much discontinued. supported by Bishop Milner. In November, 1820, A newspaper called The Truthteller was brought Mr. Andrews had begun a weekly newspaper out in September, 1824, by W. E. Andrews, and under the title of The Catholic Advocate of Civil was published weekly for one year. It then apand Reliyious Liberty, but this lasted only through peared as a weekly magazine, beginning October nine numbers. Ile resumed his Orthodox Journal Î, 1825, extended to fourteen volumes, and ended in January 1823, numbering it as if it had never April 25, 1829. been interrupted, but it ended in the year follow The Catholic Journal began on March 1, 1828, ing. Ile began a fresh periodical September 8, edited by Mr. Quin. Its special object was thé 1832, called Andreu: 's Penny Orthodox Journal. advocacy of Catholic Emancipation. It was at This came out weekly, but survived only till first of 8vo size, but on May 31 it was changed to March 1, 1834. It was followed by Andrews's the 4to form. Thus it continued till the end of Peekly Orthodo.c Journal, from March 8 to June the year; and on January 4, 1829, it appeared in 27, 1836. It was then entitled The London and the usual folio size of newspapers. When the Dublin Orthodox Journal, and, on the death of Mr. Emancipation Act passed, its object was accomAndrews, April 7, 1837, was continued by his son plished, and it ceased after March 15, 1829. till November, 1815; after which it came out A periodical was published about this time monthly under the simple original title of The called The British Colonial Quarterly Intelligencer, Orthodox Journal.

but only three or four numbers were published. The well-known Catholic bookseller, George The best conducted and most influential of Keating, successor to J. P. Coghlan, began a Catholic periodicals was The Catholic Magazine periodical in July, 1815, entitled The Publicist, or and Review, published monthly in Birmingham. Christian Philosopher. It was announced " to ap- It began in February, 1831, and was the property pear occasionally," and came out very irregularly. of a number of the clergy, chiefly of the Midland It contained however many valuable papers, prin- district. The editors were the Revs. John Kirk, cipally strictures on anticatholic publications. A F. Martyn, Ed. Peach, T. M. McDonnell, and second series was commenced with the year 1817, John Gascoyne; but lír. McDonnell was the but the name was changed to that of The Catholicon, acting editur. It continued till the end of 1835, which name indeed had been adopted at the end when it became The Calholicon, but survived only of the first volume. A third series began Feb- eight months, ending with August, 1836. ruary 1, 1823, under tlie title of The Catholic Spec The Edinburgh Catholic Magazine was undertator and Selector, or Catholicon; and this was taken by James Smith of Edinburgh, and first published at intervals for three years, ending with appeared in April, 183. A second volume began December, 1826.

with October, but lasted through only two numIn February, 1819, a periodical appeared with bers. A new series commenced in February, the title of The Catholie Gentleman's Magazine. 1837, printed and published in London, where The “Sylvanus Urban” of this magazine was

Mr. Sinith had come to reside. Three other Mr. Palmer," but its real editor and chief sup- volumes appeared as The Catholic Magazine; the

1

ations of the crown and to the head of the sceptre. Vertue engraved it for the Vetusta Monumenta in The latter portion was further investigated, and | 1718. Captain Broome repainted it about 1726, resulted in the removal of the diaper from around adding the shadows on the ernine tippet from the sceptre, and in the recovery of a beautifully the cross and sceptre, and decorating the globe drawn fowing foliage instead of the fir cone and with acanthus leaves. The picture was removed acanthus leares which had hitherto surmounted to the Jerusalem Chamber in 1775, where John it. Beneath the jewelled crown lay a highly Carter saw it and made his careful etching in burnished plain gold crown, consisting of a solid 1786, which may now be considered as the best coating of composition, which in its turn concealed record of the picture in the condition from which the original crown, drawn, like the sceptre-head, it has just been rescued. The picture has for the with free and admirably pencilled foliage upon the present been returned to the Jerusalem Chamber, pure gold, which here simply coated the actual and is happily protected by a large sheet of plate gesso ground laid upon the panel itself. This true glass. It is to be hoped that the picture may crown was closely punctured with small holes, so soon be restored to its original place in the choir arranged as to form a pattern and repeating the of Westminster Abbey, where in a good open lozenge and oval outlines of the jewels in the light it will be thoroughly well seen, and, in such circlet of the crown. Puncturings or dottings of a place, become accessible to thousands and thouthis kind, on a plain gilded surface, are considered sands of visitors.

GEORGE SCHARF. to be characteristic of MS. illuminations belong National Portrait Gallery, Dec. 1866. ing to the later portion of the fourteenth century, and, indeed, the entire appearance of this picture has very much the eífect of a page taken from some

CATHOLIC PERIODICALS. manuscript volume of that period, and extensively magnified.

I have been requested to draw up a list of The style of painting, with pale brown shadows Catholic periodical publications in England, Scoton the face, the gilded background, and a profil- land, and Ireland." I believe the following acsion of bright colours and golden borders to the count of them will be found generally correct: drapery, closely resembles the productions of the The earliest Catholic periodical was, I believe, best artists in Italy at the same period.

The Catholic Almanac for the year 1661, and succesThe clumsy and not ancient frame was found to sive years, compiled by Thos. Blount, Esq. of Orlehave encroached largely on the surface of the pic- ton, and continued probably down to the year of his ture, and to have concealed both the side portions death, 1679. On the accession of James II., it of the chair and the greater part of the curved step came out as the Kalendarium Catholicum for the in front of the throne. Unfortunately no date or year 1636, with the significant motto: “ Tristitia inscription has been found on any part of the vestra vertetur in gaudium, Alleluia." This conpicture.

tained, besides the Feasts, Fasts, Days of AbstiThe practical knowledge and assistance of Mr. nence, Calendar and explanation of the principal Chance, an experienced gilder, were of great ser Feasts, the following interesting catalogues. First, vice in regard to the difficulties of dealing with of the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen (of the the burnished crown, globe, and stucco coatings Catholic Religion) that were slain in the late warr forming the diaper; whilst Mr. Merritt's extreme in defence of their King and country.” Secondly, caution, judicious treatment, and thorough know “ The names of, such Catholicks whose estates ledge in t!e application of means to remove these (both real and personal) were sold, in pursuance masses of false colour-without in the slightest of an act made by the Rump, July 16, 1651, for degree affecting the delicate tempera painting their pretended delinquency: that is, for adhering lying beneath, and in knowing how far to go and to their King." This was followed by two other when to stop—were of vital importance. Mr. lists of 1652. Finally, “Memorable ObservaRichmond's power of distinguishing false art from tions,” giving the number of years since certain the true, and his jealous protection of all the notable events interesting to Catholics. It apfiner points in the picture as soon as discovered, peared the year following as The Catholic Almawere a guarantee for the perfect success of the rack for the year 1687, containing both the Roman whole; and it is to that gentleman's energy and and English Calendars,—an Explanation of the clearness of views that we are mainly indebted principal holydays of the whole year, with catafor the achievement of such important results. logues of the Popes from St. Peter to this present

The portrait was probably painted from the Innocentius XI., and of the Kings of England and
life in the year 1390, and appears to have under- Archbishops of Canterbury from the year 600 to
gone its greatest changes early in the sixteenth the Reformation. London : Printed by Henry
century: perhaps at the time of the building of Hills, Printer to the King's most excellent Majesty,
Henry VII.'s Chapel, when the diaper was added for his household and chappel, MDCLXXXVII.
and the shape of the crown and sceptre altered. the end of each of these almanacs is a catalogue

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of books printed for IIenry Hills, “and are to be porter was Mr. Charles Butler of Lincoln's Inn. It sold next door to his house in Blackfryers.” had a very brief existence, coming to an end in the

The Ordo recitandi for the clergy, and the following September. Laity's Directory began about the year 1761. The Catholic Vindicator was a weekly paper

The earliest Catholic periodical, in the shape in answer to one called The Protestant. It was, of a magazine, appeared towards the close of the entirely written by Mr. Andrews. It began Delast century, about the year 1790. It was called cember 5, 1818, and ended December 4, 1819. The Catholic Magazine. Who was the editor I Mr. Andrews also tried a weekly newspaper do not know, nor do I know who contributed to called The Catholic Adcocate, but it lasted only its pages; but it was, as I remember, a very re nine months. spectable periodical, well conducted, and neatly The Catholic Miscellany began with January, printed. It was of 12mo size, but extended, I | 1822. It was established by Ambrose Cuddon, believe, to no more than three or four volumes. who had come from Bungay to settle in London.

About twenty years later an attempt was made It was printed by Andrews, who had a considerto establish a Catholic Vagazine and Review; and able share in its management, till June, 1823. a similar publication was commenced in 1813, but Mr. Cuddon, however, was the responsible editor, both ceased after a few numbers.

and so continued until the end of vol. ix., June, The Orthodox Journal was started in 1813 by | 1828. A new series then commenced under the William Eusebius Andrews. lle, had been a editorship of Mr. Sidney. The publication ceased printer in the oflice of the Norfolk Chronicle in altogether in May, 1830. Mr. "Cuddon also pubNorwich, but liad settled in London as the pro- lished a Catholic Pocket-Book about this time. It fessed “Advocate of Truth.” This journal ap was well got up, and very useful, but was soon peared weekly till the end of 1820, and was much discontinued. supported by Bishop Milner. In November, 1820, A newspaper called The Truthteller was brought Mr. Andrews had begun a weekly newspaper out in September, 1824, by W. E. Andrews, and under the titie of The Catholic Advocate of Civil was published weekly for one year. and Religious Liberty, but this lasted only through peared as a weekly magazine, beginning October nine numbers. Ile resumed his Orthodox Journal 1, 1825, extended to fourteen volumes, and ended in January 1823, numbering it as if it had never April 25, 1829. been interrupted, but it ended in the year follow The Catholic Journal began on March 1, 1828, ing. lle began a fresh periodical September 8, edited by Mr. Quin. Its special object was the 1832, called Andrews's Penny Orthodox Journal. advocacy of Catholic Emancipation. It was at This came out weekly, but survived only till first of 8vo size, but on May 31 it was changed to March 1, 1834. It was followed by Andreus's the 4to form. Thus it continued till the end of Weekly Orthodox Journal, from March 8 to June the year; and on January 4, 1829, it appeared in 27, 1836. It was then entitled The London and the usual folio size of newspapers. When the Dublin Orthodox Journal, and, on the death of Mr. Emancipation Act passed, its object was accomAndrews, April 7, 1837, was continued by his son plished, and it ceased after March 15, 1829. till Norember, 1815; after which it came out A periodical was published about this time monthly under the simple original title of The called The British Colonial Quarterly Intelligencer, Orthodox Journal.

but only three or four numbers were published. The well-known Catholic bookseller, George The best conducted and most influential of Keating, successor to J. P. Coghlan, began a Catholic periodicals was The Catholic Magazine periodical in July, 1815, entitled The Publicist, or and Review, published monthly in Birminghanı. Christian Philosopher. It was announced " to ap- It began in February, 1831, and was the property pear occasionally," and came out very irregularly. of a number of the clergy, chiefly of the Midland It contained however many valuable papers, prin- district. The editors were the Revs. John Kirk, cipally strictures on anticatholic publications. A F. Martyn, Ed. Peach, T. M. McDonnell, and second series was commenced with the year 1817, John Gascoyne ; but Mr. McDonnell was the but the name was changed to that of The Catholicon, acting editor. It continued till the end of 18:35, which name indeed had been adopted at the end when it became The Catholicon, but survived only of the first volume. A third series began Feb- eight months, ending with August, 1836. ruary 1, 1823, under the title of The Catholic Spec The Edinburyh Catholic Magazine was undertator and Selector, or Catholicon; and this was taken by James Smith of Edinburgh, and first published at intervals for three years, ending with appeared in April, 1832. A second volume began December, 1826.

with October, but lasted through only two numIn February, 1818, a periodical appeared with bers. A new series commenced in February, the title of The Catholic Gentleman's Magazine. 1837, printed and published in London, where The “Sylvanus Urban” of this magazine was Mr. Sinith had come to reside. Three other "Mr. Palmer," but its real editor and chief sup- volumes appeared as The Catholic Magazine; the

last number of which was published in June, immediately from hunting and fishing to cereal 1840. A third series began in January, 1813, cultivation; that the pastoral stage of civilisation, edited by Mr. T. IIog, but ended in June, 1814. so prominent in the religious and civil liistory of

The Catholic Penny Magazine, published weekly the other three quarters of our globe, beld' no in Dublin by Coldwell, began in February, 1831, 1 place among the tribes of America. The Peruvian and ceased in December, 1835.

mountain must have been a hunting ground; but In 1836 another periodical came out under the when? Even allowing largely for the rise of the name of The Catholic Magazine. It was published | land, does it not carry us back to the time when in London by Charles Dolman, nephew and suc the Wellingtonia G. was a sapling? cessor to Mr. Booker of New Bond Street. It was A curious fact touching on the subject is, that to have taken an enlarged form in the beginning the inhabitants of the valleys lying among the of 1842, but went on as before; and at the end Peruviau Andes speak so many different dialects, of that year was near being given up. In January, that the people living in one valley cannot under1845, its name was changed for that of Dolman's stand those living in one branching from it. My Magazine and Monthly Miscellany of Criticism, and relative was not only a good linguist, having reit was then edited by Miles Gerald Keon. The i sided in Germany, lialy, and Egypt (and of course original title of The Catholic Magazine was after- thoroughly acquainted with Spanish and Portuwards resumed, but numbered as a continuation guese), but was fond of the study of language, and of the former series. The Rev. Edward Price being much alone in Peru, and travelling much on edited the latter volumes, and the periodical ended | business affairs, he collected all he could on the in 1819,

F. C. II. subject of the different dialects around him; there(To be continued.)

fore I trust what he told me.

But the broken pottery? If Mons Testaccio

owes its existence to the early age of Rome, when BROKEN POTTERY OF ANCIENT TIMES.

Isis was the deity of the people, we should find Can it be explained how so much of this refuse such relics in Egypt; if a near branch of that early has been found in strange uninhabited spots ? It tribe who have left their mark in the centre of is not that man has been there, and therefore we Europe, we should search Northern Germany for seek for the relics of his occupation; we find vast such remains. quantities of potsherds, and therefore we infer that Any information, even a theory, will be ex- . man formerly inhabited or visited the spot. It is tremely welcome; for a theory is a great stimulant easy to understand why vases, &c., are found in in searching for facts hold that every fixed ancient tumuli; but why the accumulation of opinion was at first a theory.

F. C. B. broken puttery about the Casas Grandes on the Norwich. river Gila ? And what the origin, and how the accumulation of Mons Testaccio at Rome? We ORIGINAL LETTERS OF LEIGH HUXT. are less surprised at its occurrence among the

The following letters will probably interest the sepulchral mounds of the Mississippi Valley, where readers of “N. & Q.” W. CAREW LIAZLITT. there was long occupation, and earthenware was a part of the burial utensils.

“ Wimbledon, Feb. 13 [circa 1842). A relative of mine, who lived twenty-seven years My dear Sir, in Peru, near Lima, told me that he "used occa

Accept, however late, my sincerest thanks for the sionally to creep up a mountain near, to get a

sight of the curious old Greek book * (beautifully printed), glimpse of the sea and a breath of sea air. There

and the present of the Roscoe † and Montaigne I, par

ticularly the latter, which is a most complete thing inwere no habitations,” he said, “no roads; no one

deed. L'ought to have sent this acknowledgment directly, ever went there but myself; and yet the top of but I was ill at the time, and of a disorder which throws the mountain was covered with broken pottery ! me into a state of rascally sluggishness, an attack of How did it come there?” We used to speculate liver, and so I was ungratefully silent both to you and to much and widely on this question. It cannot be

Mr. Yates $, and have not sent my book for our hind supposed that the ancient tribes who lived by and got myself altogether into such a state of incoin

American friend, and suffered other letters to accumulate, hunting and fishing broke all their utensils when

petence, that I have come out here at last to get a little they changed their hunting ground, to save the fresh air, and, if possible, a new stock of activity. When trouble of conveyance. It was surely more trouble I return, I will do my duty, and send the book, or rather to make fresh ones, even if the necessary appli- bring it, and then you shall tell me that you forgive me. ances were at hand. My brother expressly as * Phocii Bibliotheca. Never returned. sured me that this mountain near Lima was bar † Probably Roscoe's Life of Lorenzo de Medici, of ren, and that these potsherds were the sole hints which my father published an improved edition in 1846. of man's former presence there. I think it is

I The Works of Montaigne, Edited by W. Hazlitt.

1812. Humboldt who says that the tribes of the (80

$ Raymond Yates, Esq., who desired an interview with called) New World were the only ones who passed Mr. Hunt.

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