One Hundred Years of Platforms, Principles and Politics of the American Democracy

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Shelby Publishing Company, 1900 - 231 頁
 

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第 201 頁 - Our first and fundamental maxim should be, never to entangle ourselves in the broils of Europe. Our second, never to suffer \ Europe to intermeddle with cis-Atlantic affairs. America, North and South, has a set of interests distinct from those of Europe, and peculiarly her own. She should therefore have a system of her own, separate and apart from that of Europe.
第 194 頁 - Our policy, in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers ; to consider the government de facto as the legitimate government for us : to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relations by a frank, firm, and manly policy; meeting, in all instances. the just claims of every power; submitting to injuries...
第 66 頁 - American peop'le, that after four years of failure to restore the Union by the experiment of war...
第 203 頁 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting as a principle in which the rights, and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
第 194 頁 - It is impossible that the Allied Powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent without endangering our peace and happiness ; nor can anyone believe that our Southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition in any form with indifference.
第 84 頁 - ... with its administration to confine themselves within their respective constitutional spheres, avoiding in the exercise of the powers of one department to encroach upon another. The spirit of encroachment tends to consolidate the powers of all the departments in one, and thus to create, whatever the form of government, a real despotism.
第 52 頁 - That the Federal Government is one of limited powers, derived solely from the Constitution, and the grants of power made therein ought to be strictly construed by all the departments and agents of the Government ; and that it is inexpedient and dangerous to exercise doubtful constitutional powers. "2. That the Constitution does not confer upon the General Government the power to commence and carry on a general system of Internal Improvements.
第 75 頁 - Whereas, it is essential to just government we recognize the equality of all men before the law, and hold that it is the duty of government in its dealings with the people to mete out equal and exact justice to all, of whatever nativity, race, color, or persuasion, religious or political...
第 58 頁 - That Congress has no power, under the Constitution, to interfere with or control the domestic institutions of the several States, and that such States are the sole and proper judges of everything appertaining to their own affairs not prohibited by the Constitution...
第 58 頁 - That the liberal principles embodied by Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence, and sanctioned in the Constitution, which makes ours the land of Liberty, and the asylum of the oppressed of every nation, have ever been cardinal principles in the democratic faith...

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