HISTORY OF ROME.

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第 57 頁 - Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him: The evil that men do lives after them, The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious; If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
第 265 頁 - Beverage, — one breakfast cupful of cafe au hit ; that is, clear strong infusion of coffee, with scalded milk, in the proportion of one-third of the former to two-thirds of the latter.
第 79 頁 - Rome in the year 261, thirteen were now either destroyed, or were in the possession of the Opicans ; that on the Alban hills themselves Tusculum alone remained independent ; and that there was no other friendly city to obstruct the irruptions of the enemy into the territory of Rome. Accordingly, that territory was plundered year after year, and whatever defeats the plunderers may at times have sustained, yet they were never deterred from renewing a contest which they found in the main profitable...
第 132 頁 - ... the laws, sometimes lost and trodden down in the confusion of wars and tumults, and sometimes overruled by the hand of power ; then victorious over tyranny ; growing stronger, clearer, and more decisive by the violence they had suffered...
第 133 頁 - ... great expedition proved victorious, the energies of Greece during the next eventful century would have found their field in the West no less than in the East; Greece, and not Rome, might have conquered Carthage; Greek instead of Latin might have been at this day the principal element of the language of Spain, of France, and of Italy; and the laws of Athens, rather than of Rome, might be the foundation of the law of the civilized world.
第 499 頁 - Unable to fight or fly. with no quarter asked or given, the Romans and Italians fell before the swords of their enemies, till, when the sun set upon the field, there were left out of that vast multitude no more than three thousand men alive and unwounded; and these fled in straggling parties, under cover of the darkness, and found a refuge in the neighboring towns.
第 60 頁 - ... yet it is in human nature that a long undisturbed possession should give a feeling of ownership ; the more so as, while the state's claim lay dormant, the possessor was, in fact, proprietor, and the land would thus be repeatedly passing by regular sale from one occupier to another.
第 5 頁 - Pool : when all on a sudden there arose a dreadful storm, and all was as dark as night ; and the rain, and thunder, and lightning were so terrible, that all the people fled from the field, and ran to their several homes. At last the storm was over, and they came back to the Field of Mars, but Romulus was nowhere to be found ; for Mars, his father, had carried him up to heaven in his chariot.
第 3 頁 - Numitor's herdsmen laid an ambush, and Remus fell into it, and was taken and carried off to Alba. But when the young man was brought before Numitor, he was struck with his noble air and bearing, and asked him who he was. And when Remus told him of his birth, and how he had been saved from death, together with his brother, Numitor marvelled, and thought whether this might not be his own daughter's child. In the meanwhile, Faustulus and Romulus hastened to Alba to deliver Remus ; and by the help of...
第 78 頁 - Roman historians : it is enough to say that, at the close of the third century of Rome, the warfare which the Romans had to maintain against the Opican nations was generally defensive...

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