Emperor and Ancestor: State and Lineage in South China

封面
Stanford University Press, 2007年3月1日 - 480 頁
1 評論
This book summarizes twenty years of the author's work in historical anthropology and documents his argument that in China, ritual provided the social glue that law provided in the West. The book offers a readable history of the special lineage institutions for which south China has been noted and argues that these institutions fostered the mechanisms that enabled south China to be absorbed into the imperial Chinese state first, by introducing rituals that were acceptable to the state, and second, by providing mechanisms that made group ownership of property feasible and hence made it possible to pool capital for land reclamation projects important to the state. Just as taxation, defense, and recognition came together with the emergence of powerful lineages in the sixteenth century, their disintegration in the late nineteenth century signaled the beginnings of a new Chinese state.

 

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內容

Introduction
1
Historical Geography
15
Exotic Guangzhou
17
Confucian Incursions
27
We and They
38
The Land
51
The Pearl River Delta
52
From Registered Households to Lineages
65
The End of Empire
164
The Proliferation of Lineage Institutions
177
The Ordering of Community in Ritual Life
193
Dagang Market
198
The Power of an Idea
218
A Note on Prosperity
233
The Mulberry Garden Dike
253
The Mulberry Garden Dike
254

Early Ming Society
67
The Recession of Labor Service
79
The Yao Wars and Ritual Orthodoxy
93
Figures
102
Administrative Transition
109
Lineages Gentrified
123
The Huo Surname of Foshan
125
Huo Taos representation of the threecompartment ancestral
127
Magnates on the Sands
136
Gentry Leadership in Local Society
151
From Paramilitary to Militia
273
Local Power in the Taiping Rebellion
291
The Foreign Element in Pearl River Delta Society
308
The Backwardness
325
Beyond the Pearl River Delta
351
Notes
371
References
413
Glossary
447
Index
457
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熱門章節

第 413 頁 - Femmes" in Family Process and Political Process in Modern Chinese History (Taipei: Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, 1992), Part I, pp.

關於作者 (2007)

David Faure is Professor of History at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is the coeditor of Down to Earth: The Territorial Bond in South China (Stanford University Press, 1995).

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