The Book of Science,: Second Series, Comprising Treatises on Chemistry, Metallurgy, Mineralogy, Crystallography, Geology, Oryctology, Meteorology. Adapted to the Comprehension of Young People

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Chapman and Hall, 1835 - 480 頁
 

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第 129 頁 - The ruins of an older world,' said Hutton, ' are visible in the present structure of our planet ; and the strata which now compose our continents have been once beneath the sea, and were formed out of the waste of pre-existing continents. The same forces are still destroying, by chemical decomposition or mechanical violence, even the hardest rocks, and transporting the materials to the sea, * Ed.
第 131 頁 - ... period, so many novel and unexpected truths, and overturn so many preconceived opinions. The senses had for ages declared the earth to be at rest, until the astronomer taught that it was carried through space with inconceivable rapidity. In like manner was the surface of this planet regarded as having remained unaltered since its creation, until the geologist proved that it had been the theatre of reiterated change, and was still the subject of slow but never-ending fluctuations.
第 172 頁 - ... fourth part of the surface; and that portion is almost exclusively a theatre of decay, and not of reproduction. We know, indeed, that new deposits are annually formed in seas and lakes, and that every year some new igneous rocks are produced in the bowels of the earth, but we cannot watch the progress of their formation; and as they are only present to our minds by the aid of reflection, it requires an effort both of the reason and the imagination to appreciate duly their importance.
第 131 頁 - ... not been limited to the few thousand years of man's existence. The geologist tells us by the clearest interpretation of the phenomena which his labours have brought to light, that our globe has been subject to vast physical revolutions. He counts his time not by celestial cycles, but by an index he has found in the solid framework of the globe itself. He sees a long succession of monuments, each of which may have required a thousand ages for its elaboration.
第 131 頁 - By the discoveries of a new SCIENCE (the very name of which has been but a few years engrafted on our language,) we learn that the manifestations of God's power on the earth have not been limited to the few thousand years of man's existence. The geologist tells us, by the clearest interpretation of the phenomena which his labours have brought to light, that our globe has been subject to vast physical revolutions. He counts his time, not by celestial cycles, but by an index he has found in the solid...
第 129 頁 - A great body of new data was required ; and the Geological Society of London, founded in 1807, conduced greatly to the attainment of this desirable end. To multiply and record observations, and patiently to await the result at some future period, was the object proposed by them ; and it was their favourite maxim that the time was not yet come for a general system of geology, but that all must be content for many years to be exclusively engaged in furnishing materials for future generalisations.
第 230 頁 - Striking the ground with such impetuous force, it is easy to conceive the extensive injury which a hail shower may occasion in the hotter climates. The destructive power of these missiles in stripping and tearing the fruits and foliage, increases besides in a faster ratio than the momentum, and may be estimated by the square of their velocity multiplied into their mass. This fatal energy is hence...
第 23 頁 - ... broken open, some flames which were in the room were soon extinguished. Between the bed and the chimney were found the remains of the unfortunate Clues; one leg and a thigh were still entire, but there remained nothing of the skin, the muscles, or the viscera.
第 23 頁 - Let six drams of a saturated solution of pure silver in nitric acid, and four drams of a similar solution of mercury in the same acid, be diluted with five ounces of distilled water, and poured into a small decanter or glass phial ; then compose an amalgam, by mixing one part of finely-divided silver with seven parts of mercury, and place a small lump of it at the bottom of the bottle, which must be kept quite still. In a short time, the surface of the amalgam will be covered with minute filaments...
第 191 頁 - Quintero, that an old wreck of a ship which before could not be approached, was now accessible from the land, although its place on the shore had not been shifted. The alteration of level...

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