Manners and Customs of the Japanese in the Nineteenth Century

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Mrs. M. M. Busk
Harper & Bros., 1841 - 298 頁
 

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第 99 頁 - Then he ordered us to take off our cappa or cloak, being our garment of ceremony ; then to stand upright, that he might have a full view of us ; again, to walk, to stand still, to compliment each other, to dance, to jump, to play the drunkard, to speak broken Japanese, to read Dutch, to paint, to sing, to put our cloaks on and off.
第 256 頁 - TanegaSime,* near Koura, in the remote province Nisimura. The crew, about two hundred in number, had a singular appearance ; their language was unintelligible — their native land unknown. On board was a Chinese, named Go-hou, who understood writing; from him it was gathered that this was a nan-ban ship (southern barbarian; in the Japanese form of the Chinese words nan-man).
第 97 頁 - Captain !' which was the signal for him to draw near, and make his obeisance. Accordingly he crawled on his hands and knees to a place shown him, between the presents ranged in due order on one side, and the place where the emperor sat, on the other, and then kneeling, he bowed his forehead quite down to the ground, and so crawled backwards, like a crab, without uttering one single word. So mean and short a thing is the audience we have of this mighty monarch.
第 242 頁 - I can love none but my slain master. I owe you gratitude; but you caused Prince Feki's death, and never can I look upon you without wishing to kill you. My best way to avoid such ingratitude, and to reconcile my conflicting duties, is never to see you more ; and thus do I insure it.
第 232 頁 - The plant is pollarded to render it more branchy, and therefore more productive, and must be five years old before the leaves are gathered.
第 99 頁 - ... of us ; again, to walk, to stand still, to compliment each other, to dance, to jump, to play the drunkard, to speak broken Japanese, to read Dutch, to paint, to sing, to put our cloaks on and off. Meanwhile we...
第 97 頁 - ... single word. So mean and short a thing is the audience we have of this mighty monarch. Nor are there any more ceremonies observed in the audience he gives, even to the greatest and most powerful princes of the empire. For, having been called into the hall, their names are cried out aloud, then they move on their hands and feet humbly and silently towards the Emperor's seat, and having showed their submission, by bowing their forehead down to the ground, they creep back again in the same submissive...
第 61 頁 - Shock followed shock, and the volcano incessantly vomited forth stones, ashes, and lava, that desolated the country for miles around. At noon on the 1st of the fourth month another earthquake occurred, followed by reiterated shocks more and more violent. Houses •were overthrown, and enormous masses of rock, rolling down from the mountain, crushed whatever lay in their way. When all seemed quiet and the danger was believed to be over, sounds like the roar of artillery were heard in the air and from...
第 99 頁 - They asked whether I could make it up? Upon this, our resident whispered me to say, ' No ; ' but I answered, ' Yes, I could make it up, but not here.
第 185 頁 - Kiyemon, to make money out of his countrymen's passion for whatever is odd and strange.* He contrived to unite the upper half of a monkey to the lower half of a fish, so neatly as to defy ordinary inspection. He then gave out that he had caught the creature alive in his net, but that it had died shortly after being taken out of the water ; and he derived considerable pecuniary profit from his device in more ways than one. The exhibition of the...

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