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Than Hector is. The wound of peace is surety Surety secure; but modest doubt is call'd The beacon of the wise, the tent that searches To the bottom of the worst. Let Helen go. Since the first sword was drawn about thi question,

Every tithe soul, 'mongst many thousan dismes,

Hath been as dear as Helen; I mean, of our
If we have lost so many tenths of ours,
To guard a thing not ours nor worth to us,
Had it our name, the value of one ten,
What merit 's in that reason which denies
The yielding of her up?

Tro.
Fie, fie, my brother!
Weigh you the worth and honour of a king
So great as our dread father in a scale
Of common ounces? Will you with counte

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135

Par. Else might the world convince of levity As well my undertakings as your counsels; 131 But I attest the gods, your full consent Gave wings to my propension and cut off All fears attending on so dire a project. For what, alas, can these my single arms? What propugnation is in one man's valour, To stand the push and enmity of those This quarrel would excite? Yet, I protest, Were I alone to pass the difficulties And had as ample power as I have will, Paris should ne'er retract what he hath done, Nor faint in the pursuit.

Pri. Paris, you speak Like one besotted on your sweet delights. You have the honey still, but these the gall; So to be valiant is no praise at all.

Par. Sir, I propose not merely to myself

140

145

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Have ears more deaf than adders to the voice
Of any true decision. Nature craves
All dues be rend'red to their owners: now,
What nearer debt in all humanity

170

175

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Than wife is to the husband? If this law
Of nature be corrupted through affection,
And that great minds, of partial indulgence
To their benumbed wills, resist the same,
There is a law in each well-ord’red nation
To curb those raging appetites that are
Most disobedient and refractory.
If Helen then be wife to Sparta's king,
As it is known she is, these moral laws
Of nature and of nations speak aloud
To have her back return'd. Thus to persist
In doing wrong extenuates not wrong,
But makes it much more heavy. Hector's opin-

ion

Is this in way of truth; yet ne'ertheless, My spritely brethren, I propend to you

In resolution to keep Helen still,

185

190

For 't is a cause that hath no mean dependence Upon our joint and several dignities.

Tro. Why, there you touch'd the life of our design.

195

Were it not glory that we more affected
Than the performance of our heaving spleens,
I would not wish a drop of Troyan blood
Spent more in her defence. But, worthy Hec-
tor,

She is a theme of honour and renown,

A spur to valiant and magnanimous deeds, 200 Whose present courage may beat down our foes,

And fame in time to come canonize us;

For, I presume, brave Hector would not lose

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[SCENE III. The Greek camp. Before Achilles's tent.]

Enter THERSITES, solus.

Ther. How now, Thersites! What, lost in the labyrinth of thy fury! Shall the elephan Ajax carry it thus? He beats me, and I rail a: him. O, worthy satisfaction! would it were otherwise; that I could beat him, whilst he rail'd at me. 'S foot, I'll learn to conjure and raise devils, but I'll see some issue of my spiteful execrations. Then there's Achilles, a rare enginer! If Troy be not taken till these two undermine it, the walls will stand till they fall of themselves. O thou great thunderdarter of Olympus, forget that thou art Jove, the king of gods, and, Mercury, lose all the ser pentine craft of thy caduceus, if ye take not that little little less than little wit from the that they have, which short-arm'd ignorance itself knows is so abundant scarce, it will in circumvention deliver a fly from a spider without drawing their massy irons and cutting the web! After this, the vengeance on the whole camp! or rather, the [Neapolitan) bo ache! for that, methinks, is the curse des pendent on those that war for a placket. I have said my prayers, and devil Envy say Amen What ho! my Lord Achilles !

Enter PATROCLUS.

Patr. Who's there? Thersites! Good Ther sites, come in and rail.

Ther. If I could have rememb'red a g counterfeit, thou wouldst not have slipp'd a of my contemplation. But it is no matter; thy self upon thyself! The common curse of ma kind, folly and ignorance, be thine in great revenue! Heaven bless thee from a tutor, and discipline come not near thee! Let thy bloo be thy direction till thy death, then if sh that lays thee out says thou art a fair corsI'll be sworn and sworn upon 't she never shrouded any but lazars. Amen. Where' Achilles?

Patr. What, art thou devout? Wast thou i prayer?

Ther. Ay; the heavens hear me ! [Patr. Amen.]

Enter ACHILLES.

Achil. Who's there?
Patr, Thersites, my lord.

Achil. Where, where? Art thou come

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Par. Why am I a fool?

70

Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, NESTOR, DIO-
MEDES, AJAX, and CALCHAS.

Ther. Make that demand of the Creator; suffices me thou art. Look you, who comes bere?

A. Patroclus, I'll speak with nobody. [Exit. 76 Cerein with me, Thersites. Ther. Here is such patchery, such juggling, and ach knavery! All the argument is a eck and a whore; a good quarrel to draw

as factions and bleed to death upon. Now, the dry serpigo on the subject, and war [Exit.] 82 wdlechery confound all!

Agt. Where is Achilles?

Patr. Within his tent; but ill dispos'd, my lord.

Agam. Let it be known to him that we are here.

He sent our messengers, and we lay by rappertainments, visiting of him.

85

im be told so, lest perchance he think dare not move the question of our place, 89 Or how not what we are.

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I shall so say to him. [Exit.] Tyss. We saw him at the opening of his

tent:

He is not sick.

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Aar. Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart. I may call it melancholy, if you will favour aan, but.by my head, it is pride; but why, Let him show us the cause. A word, [Takes Agamemnon aside.] 97 2rd. Vest. What moves Ajax thus to bay at Achilles hath inveigled his fool from

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Nest. Who, Thersites ?
Ulyss. He.

Nest. Then will Ajax lack matter, if he have lost his argument.

Ulyss. No, you see, he is his argument that has his argument, Achilles.

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Nest. All the better; their fraction is more our wish than their faction. But it was a strong composure a fool could disunite. Ulyss. The amity that wisdom knits not, folly may easily untie.

Re-enter PATROCLUS.

Here comes Patroclus.

Nest. No Achilles with him.

111

Ulyss. The elephant hath joints, but none for courtesy. His legs are legs for necessity, not for flexure.

115

Patr. Achilles bids me say, he is much sorry
If anything more than your sport and pleasure
Did move your greatness and this noble state
To call upon him. He hopes it is no other
But for your health and your digestion sake, 120
An after-dinner's breath.

Agam.

Hear you, Patroclus. We are too well acquainted with these an

swers;

124

But his evasion, wing'd thus swift with scorn,
Cannot outfly our apprehensions.
Much attribute he hath, and much the reason
Why we ascribe it to him; yet all his virtues,
Not virtuously of his own part beheld,
Do in our eyes begin to lose their gloss,
Yea, like fair fruit in an unwholesome dish,
Are like to rot untasted. Go and tell him
We came to speak with him; and you shall not
sin

130

If you do say we think him over-proud
And under-honest, in self-assumption greater
Than in the note of judgement; and worthier

than himself

139

Here tend the savage strangeness he puts on, 135
Disguise the holy strength of their command,
And underwrite in an observing kind
His humorous predominance; yea, watch
His pettish lines, his ebbs, his flows, as if
The passage and whole carriage of this action
Rode on his tide. Go tell him this, and add,
That if he overhold his price so much,
We'll none of him; but let him, like an engine
Not portable, lie under this report:

Bring action hither, this cannot go to war." 145
A stirring dwarf we do allowance give
Before a sleeping giant. Tell him so.

[Exit.] Patr. I shall; and bring his answer presently.

Agam. In second voice we'll not be satis

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Agam.

Let Ajax go to him.

Dear lord, go you and greet him in his tent. 'Tis said he holds you well, and will be led 190 At your request a little from himself.

Ulyss. O Agamemnon, let it not be so! We'll consecrate the steps that Ajax makes When they go from Achilles. Shall the proud lord

That bastes his arrogance with his own seam 195
And never suffers matter of the world
Enter his thoughts, save such as do revolve
And ruminate himself, shall he be worshipp'd
Of that we hold an idol more than he?

No, this thrice worthy and right valiant lord 200
Must not so stale his palm, nobly acquir'd;
Nor, by my will, assubjugate his merit,
As amply titled as Achilles' is,

By going to Achilles.

That were to enlard his fat-already pride

And add more coals to Cancer when he burns
With entertaining great Hyperion.
This lord go to him! Jupiter forbid,
And say in thunder, "Achilles go to him."

205

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Ajax. If I go to him, with my armed fist I'll pash him o'er the face. Agam. O, no, you shall not go.

Ajax. Ana be proud with me, I'll pheese his pride.

Let me go to him.

Ulyss. Not for the worth that hangs upon our quarrel.

Ajar. A paltry, insolent fellow!
Nest. How he describes himself!
Ajax. Can he not be sociable?
Ulyss. The raven chides blackness.
Ajar. I'll let his humours blood.

Agam. He will be the physician that should be the patient.

Ajar. An all men were o' my mind. -
Ulyss. Wit would be out of fashion.

Ajar. 'A should not bear it so, 'a should eat swords first. Shall pride carry it?

Nest. An't would, you 'd carry half. Ulyss. A would have ten shares. Ajax. I will knead him; I'll make him supple.

Nest. He's not yet through warm. Force him with praises; pour in, pour in; his ambition is dry.

Ulyss. To Agam.] My lord, you feed to much on this dislike.

Nest. Our noble general, do not do so.
Dio. You must prepare to fight without
Achilles.

Ulyss. Why, 't is this naming of him doth

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Thy spacious and dilated parts. Here's Nestor
Instructed by the antiquary times,
He must, he is, he cannot but be wise:
But pardon, father Nestor, were your days
As green as Ajax' and your brain so temper d.
You should not have the eminence of him.
But be as Ajax.

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