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Cres. Peace, for shame, peace! Pan. Mark him; note him. O brave Troilus! Look well upon him, niece. Look you how his word is bloodied, and his helm more hack'd than Hector's, and how he looks, and how he gos: O admirable youth! he ne'er saw three and twenty. Go thy way, Troilus, go thy [255 way! Had I a sister were a grace, or a daughter a goddess, he should take his choice. O admirable man! Paris? Paris is dirt to him; and, I Warrant, Helen, to change, would give money

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nought else

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But the protractive trials of great Jove
To find persistive constancy in men;
The fineness of which metal is not found
In fortune's love; for then the bold and coward,
The wise and fool, the artist and unread,
The hard and soft, seem all affin'd and kin. 25
But, in the wind and tempest of her frown,
Distinction, with a loud and powerful fan,
Puffing at all, winnows the light away;
And what hath mass or matter, by itself
Lies rich in virtue and unmingled.

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Nest. With due observance of thy godlike

seat,

Great Agamemnon, Nestor shall apply
Thy latest words. In the reproof of chance
Lies the true proof of men. The sea being
smooth,

[Exit Pandarus.

How many shallow bauble boats dare sail

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Observe degree, priority, and place,
Insisture, course, proportion, season, form,
Office, and custom, in all line of order;
And therefore is the glorious planet Sol
In noble eminence enthron'd and spher`d
Amidst the other; whose medicinable eye
Corrects the ill aspects of planets evil,
And posts, like the commandment of a king,
Sans check to good and bad. But when the
planets

In evil mixture to disorder wander,
What plagues and what portents! what mu
tiny!

What raging of the sea! shaking of earth! Commotion in the winds! Frights, changes horrors,

Divert and crack, rend and deracinate
The unity and married calm of states
Quite from their fixture! O, when degree is

shak'd,

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too.

Then everything includes itself in power,
Power into will, will into appetite;

And appetite, an universal wolf,

So doubly seconded with will and power,
Must make perforce an universal prey,

And last eat up himself. Great Agamemnon
This chaos, when degree is suffocate,
Follows the choking.

And this neglection of degree is it
That by a pace goes backward, in a purpose
It hath to climb. The general 's disdain'd
By him one step below, he by the next.
That next by him beneath; so every step,
Exampled by the first pace that is siek
Of his superior, grows to an envious fever
Of pale and bloodless emulation;

And 't is this fever that keeps Troy on foot.
Not her own sinews. To end a tale of length
Troy in our weakness stands, not in her streng
Nest. Most wisely hath Ulysses here
cover'd

The fever whereof all our power is sick.
Agam. The nature of the sickness fou
Ulysses,
What is the remedy?

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Tis Nestor right. Now play him me, Patrodas,

Aring to answer in a night alarm."

170

Ard. forsooth, the faint defects of age Me the scene of mirth; to cough and spit, And with a palsy fumbling on his gorget,

in and out the rivet; and at this sport 175 Valour dies; cries, " Ó, enough, Patroclus; give me ribs of steel! I shall split all pleasure of my spleen." And in this fashion, Aler abilities, gifts, natures, shapes,

erals and generals of grace exact, Aevements, plots, orders, preventions, ements to the field, or speech for truce, or loss, what is or is not, serves

180

Auf for these two to make paradoxes. St. And in the imitation of these twain

Thea Ulysses says, opinion crowns

an imperial voice-many are infect. grown self-will'd, and bears his head cha rein, in full as proud a place

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brad Achilles; keeps his tent like him; 190 sfactious feasts; rails on our state of

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A stranger to those most imperial looks
Know them from eyes of other mortals?
Agam.
Ene. Ay.

I ask, that I might waken reverence,
And bid the cheek be ready with a blush
Modest as Morning when she coldly eyes
The youthful Phoebus.

How?

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Which is that god in office, guiding men? Which is the high and mighty Agamemnon? Agam. This Troyan scorns us; or the men of Troy

Are ceremonious courtiers.

Ene. Courtiers as free, as debonair, unarm'd,

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As bending angels; that's their fame in peace. But when they would seem soldiers, they have

galls,

Good arms, strong joints, true swords; and,
Jove's accord,

Nothing so full of heart. But peace, Æneas,
Peace, Troyan; lay thy finger on thy lips! 240
The worthiness of praise distains his worth,
If that the prais'd himself bring the praise

forth;

But what the repining enemy commends, That breath fame blows; that praise, sole pure, transcends.

Agam. Sir, you of Troy, call you yourself

Eneas?

Ene. Ay, Greek, that is my name.

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tents,

And every Greek of mettle, let him know,
What Troy means fairly shall be spoke aloud.
[The trumpets sound.

We have, great Agamemnon, here in Troy 200
A prince call'd Hector, - Priam is his father
Who in this dull and long-continu'd truce
Is rusty grown; he bade me take a trumpet,
And to this purpose speak. Kings, princes,
lords!

If there be one amongst the fair'st of Greece 265
That holds his honour higher than his ease,
That seeks his praise more than he fears his
peril,

That knows his valour, and knows not his fear,

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Hector, in view of Troyans and of Greeks,
Shall make it good, or do his best to do it,
He hath a lady, wiser, fairer, truer,
Than ever Greek did compass in his arms,
And will to-morrow with his trumpet call
Midway between your tents and walls of Troy,
To rouse a Grecian that is true in love.
If any come, Hector shall honour him;
If none, he 'll say in Troy when he retires,
The Grecian dames are sunburnt and not worth
The splinter of a lance. Even so much.

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Agam. This shall be told our lovers, Lord Eneas.

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Was fairer than his grandam, and as chaste As may be in the world. His youth in flood, I'll prove this truth with my three drops of blood.

Ene. Now heavens forbid such scarcity of youth! Ulyss. Amen.

Agam. Fair Lord Æneas, let me touch your hand;

To our pavilion shall I lead you first.
Achilles shall have word of this intent;
So shall each lord of Greece, from tent to tent.
Yourself shall feast with us before you go
And find the welcome of a noble foe.

[Exeunt all but Ulysses and Nestor

Ulyss. Nestor !

Nest. What says Ulysses?

Ulyss. I have a young conception in my

brain;

Be you my time to bring it to some shape.
Nest. What is 't?
Ulyss. This 't is :

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Blunt wedges rive hard knots. The seeder pride

That hath to this maturity blown up
In rank Achilles must or now be cropp'd
Or, shedding, breed a nursery of like evil,
To overbulk us all.
Nest.

Well, and how? Ulyss. This challenge that the gallant He tor sends,

However it is spread in general name,
Relates in purpose only to Achilles.

Nest. The purpose is perspicuous eveni substance,

Whose grossness little characters sum up; And, in the publication, make no strain, But that Achilles, were his brain as barren As banks of Libya, - though, Apollo knows 'Tis dry enough, will, with great speed judgement,

Ay, with celerity, find Hector's purpose
Pointing on him.

Ulyss. And wake him to the answer, this you?

Nest. Yes, 't is most meet. Who may y

else oppose

That can from Hector bring his honour off. If not Achilles? Though 't be a sportful ca

bat,

Yet in this trial much opinion dwells;
For here the Troyans taste our dear'st reput
With their fin'st palate; and trust to n

Ulysses,

Our imputation shall be oddly pois'd
In this wild action; for the success.
Although particular, shall give a scantling
Of good or bad unto the general;
And in such indexes, although small pricks
To their subsequent volumes, there is seen
The baby figure of the giant mass

Of things to come at large. It is suppos'd
He that meets Hector issues from our choic
And choice, being mutual act of all our sou
Makes merit her election, and doth boil.
As 't were from forth us all, a man distill'
Out of our virtues; who miscarrying,

What heart from hence receives the conquering part,

To steel a strong opinion to themselves?
Which entertain'd, limbs are his instruments,
In no less working than are swords and bows 355
Directive by the limbs.

Liss. Give pardon to my speech:

Therefore 't is meet Achilles meet not Hector.
Let us, like merchants, show our foulest wares,
And think, perchance, they 'll sell; if not, 360
The lustre of the better yet to show,
Shall show the better. Do not consent
That ever Hector and Achilles meet;

For both our honour and our shame in this
Are dogg'd with two strange followers.

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Vest. I see them not with my old eyes. What are they?

Cass. What glory our Achilles shares from Hector,

Were he not proud, we all should wear with

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Ther. I would thou didst itch from head to foot and I had the scratching of thee. I would make thee the loathsom'st scab in Greece. [When thou art forth in the incursions, thou strik'st as slow as another.]

Ajax. I say, the proclamation!

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Ther. Thou grumblest and railest every hour on Achilles, and thou art as full of envy at his greatness as Cerberus is at Proserpina's beauty, ay, that thou bark'st at him.

Ajax. Mistress Thersites !

Ther. Thou shouldst strike him.
Ajax. Cobloaf!

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Ther. He would pun thee into shivers with his fist, as a sailor breaks a biscuit. Ajax. [Beating him.] You whoreson cur! Ther. Do, do.

Ajax. Thou stool for a witch!

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Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS. Achil. Why, how now, Ajax! wherefore do you this? How now, Thersites! what's the matter, man?

Ther. You see him there, do you?
Achil. Ay; what's the matter?

Ther. Nay, look upon him.

Achil. So I do. What's the matter?
Ther. Nay, but regard him well.

Achil. Well! why, I do so.

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Ther. But yet you look not well upon him ; for, whosomever you take him to be, he is Ajax.

Achil. I know that, fool.

Ther. Ay, but that fool knows not himself. Ajax. Therefore I beat thee.

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Ther. Lo, lo, lo, lo, what modicums of wit he utters! His evasions have ears thus long. I have bobb'd his brain more than he has beat my bones. I will buy nine sparrows for a penny,

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