Proceedings of the Louisville Bar Association, John Marshall Day, Louisville, February 4, 1901

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第 60 頁 - That the power to tax involves the power to destroy; that ; the power to destroy may defeat and render useless the power to create; that there is a plain repugnance in conferring on one government a power to control the constitutional measures of another, which other, with respect to those very means, is declared to be supreme over that which exerts the control, are propositions not to be denied.
第 42 頁 - That it thus reduces to nothing what we have deemed the greatest improvement on political institutions, a written constitution, would of itself be sufficient, in America, where written constitutions have been viewed with so much reverence, for rejecting the construction.
第 58 頁 - Its nature, therefore, requires, that only its great outlines should be marked, its important objects designated, and the minor ingredients which compose those objects be deduced from the nature of the objects themselves.
第 60 頁 - ... an abuse, because it is the usurpation of a power which the people of a single state cannot give." The court said, in that case, that " the states have no power. by taxation, or otherwise, to retard, impede, burden, or in any manner control the operation of the constitutional laws enacted by congress to carry into execution the powers vested in the general government.
第 7 頁 - Th' applause of listening senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their history in a nation's eyes...
第 43 頁 - From these, and many other selections which might be made, it is apparent that the framers of the Constitution contemplated that instrument as a rule for the government of courts, as well as of the legislature.
第 41 頁 - It would declare that if the legislature shall do what is expressly forbidden, such act, notwithstanding the express prohibition, is in reality effectual. It would be giving to the legislature a practical and real omnipotence, with the same breath which professes to restrict their powers within narrow limits. It is prescribing limits, and declaring that those limits may be passed at pleasure.
第 42 頁 - ... intention of those who gave this power to say that in using it the Constitution should not be looked into? That a case arising under the Constitution should be decided without examining the instrument under which it arises? "This is too extravagant to be maintained. "In some cases, then, the construction must be looked into by the judges. And if they can open it at all, what part of it are they forbidden to read or to obey?
第 74 頁 - On the contrary, if war be actually levied, that is, if a body of men be actually assembled for the purpose of effecting by force a treasonable purpose, all those who perform any part, however minute or however remote from the scene of action, and who are actually leagued in the general conspiracy, are to be considered as traitors.
第 42 頁 - The judicial power of the United States is extended to all cases arising under the Constitution. Could it be the intention of those who gave this power, to say that in using it the Constitution should not be looked into? That a case arising under the Constitution should be decided without examining the instrument under which it arises? This is too extravagant to be maintained.

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