The Emotions and the Will

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Longmans, Green, 1865 - 616 頁

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Concurrence of organic effects with mental statesthe
10
Praise and Admiration Flattery and Adulation
14
Intermediate Actions and Associated Ends Associates
15
When we say Mind is a source of power we must
16
The persistence and recurrence in idea of feelings
17
Examples of operation of the feelings on Belief
22
Retentiveness stimulated by feeling distinct from
23
Means of ascertaining and estimating the feelings
28
CHAPTER II
35
CHAPTER III
41
Elation of tone caused by the emotion
47
CHAPTER V
53
CHAPTER VI
70
Family Group
78
Gratitude Spectacle of Generosity
84
Admiration the response to superior excellence
88
CHAPTER VII
94
Characteristics of selfcomplacent sentiment generally
102
Approbation
108
Arts of Politesse
110
Censore Disapprobation Dispraise Abuse Libel Scorn Infamy
111
Shame ib 18 Bearing of education or culture on the emotions of self
112
Employment in Art ib 20 Selflove and Selfishness Prudent calculation
113
The most disinterested actions still a part of Self
114
CHAPTER VIII
115
Proper pleasure a rebound from weakness or difficulty
117
Different modes of transition or comparison
118
PHYSICAL SIDE Increase of energy erect attitude Laughter
119
MENTAL SIDE Characters of the pleasure
120
Specific forms Position of headship in industrial operations
121
Working for objects of affection ib 8 Bending the Wills of other men
122
Command given by Science
123
Superiority in the effects of Fine Art Eloquence ib 12 Love of influence working in society generally
124
Summary view of the pleasure of Power ib 14 Pains of Impotence Failure sense of Littleness
125
Jealousy
126
Objects of the emotion persons the authors of pain
127
Antipathy
138
Noble Rage
144
one of the senses with or without active exertion
148
Games of Chance
154
Literature of Plotinterest
160
Illustrative comparisons Pleasures of knowledge
166
CHAPTER XII
172
TABLE OF CONTENTS xix
178
Purely ideal subsistence of states of feeling
191
Operation of the intellectual forces of Contiguity
201
The Religious sentiment an outgoing of the ideal
207
Problem of the Beautiful
213
Simple Emotions touched by the Artist
220
Time in music
224
Varying Emphasis
225
Cadence ib 15 Composition
226
Harmonies of Sight Harmony of Colours Light and Shade Lustre
227
Straight Outlines
229
Carved Outlines
230
Pressure and Support
231
Appearance of Ease in objects employed in giving sup port
232
Symmetry
233
Beauty of Movement
234
Fitness the Asthetic of Utility
235
Order Cleanliness Polish
236
The Sublime Objects and emotion
237
Sublime of Support The mountain precipice and abyss
238
Sublimity of Space Commanding prospects in scenery
239
Greatness of Time Relations of Terror to the Sublime
240
Natural Objects in general Mineral and Vegetable Kingdoms Surface of the globe
242
The Animal Kingdom its beauties and deformities
243
The Human form
244
Beauties of Movement and Expression 215
245
Beauty and grace in Human Character
246
The Ludicrous Causes of Laughter
247
Ludicrous Degradation as a mode of Release from constraint The Comic a rebound from the Serious
250
There is no such thing as a Universal Conscience
266
Principle of Utility
272
Examples of Sentiment converted into law and morality
278
Other varieties of conscience
287
CHAPTER I
297
Necessity of an isolated spontaneity as a prelude
304
Volitional branch of the Law of Selfconservation
310
Chase for food by the lower animals
316
CHAPTER III
339
Adoption as a final end of what was originally a means
394
Statement of the point attained in the exposition
402
Opposition of two states of present pleasure or pain
407
Ideal emotions supported by associations
414
Example
421
Deliberative process different as it deals with things
427
There is usually a certain consciousness accompanying
434
mean mind together with body
436
The habitual actions tend to become unconscious
437
CHAPTER VIII
438
Form of Desire in protracted operations for ends
439
Eudurance ib 5 The stimulus to endurance is the pain of conflict 410
442
Persistence of a feeling in absence a condition of imagi nary gratification
443
Examples of ideal activity
444
Emotions suited to imaginary gratification
446
The memory of pleasure has a sting of pain from the sense of its being below the reality
447
Provocatives of desire 419
449
Susceptibility to ideal inflammation
451
Desire most effectually stimulated by growing pleasure
453
CHAPTER IX
455
Control of Sense and Appetite
456
Examples The habit of early rising
457
The proper initiatives of habits
459
Habits of Temperance
460
Control of Attention
461
Suppression of Instinctive movements
462
Lowering or raising of special emotions
464
Habit of Courage ib 11 Tender Emotion
465
Sentiment of Power Command of the Temper 467 12 Sentiment of Power Command of the Temper 13 Pleasures of Sport and Plotinterest Emotions ...
468
Taste and Æsthetic culture ib 18 Sudden conversions as opposed to the slow course of habit
469
Habits modifying the original spontaneity
470
Repression of Desire Contentment ib 18 Domestication of the animal tribes
471
Habits in opposition to intellectual trains Concen tration of thought
472
CHAPTER X
474
Promptings supplied from without
475
Leisurely meditation an element of prudence
476
Characters moulded on the prudential cast ib 5 Forces hostile to prudence
477
It is possible to predict the future conduct of an indi vidual from the past
479
Duty Selfpromptings
480
Prohibition by penalties the first source of the Moral Sentiment The Slavish Conscience
481
Elements that concur to form the Citizen Conscience
483
The Independent Conscience
486
1 Aids to conscience
487
Counterimpulses to duty
488
Moral Inability
489
Plea of moral inability put forward by an offender
491
LIBERTY AND NECESSITY
493
There is a real contrariety of opinion as respects
502
Self can only mean the sum total of motives
509
Assertions that have bee 2 put forward under the infal
517
In the primitive aspect of Volition belief has no place
524
means
525
Belief implies some cognisance of the order of nature
526
Affirmations may be detached from actions or
527
Belief is a source of happiness or misery
529
Relationship of Belief to Terror Doubt ib 7 Belief in coming evil
532
Joy and Depression as caused by belief
533
SOURCES of belief
535
Intuitive tendencies
537
Belief accompanies action and precedes experience
539
Fallacies grounded in instinctive beliefs
540
Experience as a source of belief
541
Influence of Emotion
544
Opposition of Confidence and Fear
546
Emotions considered as operating to elevate or depress the mental tone
547
Belief in Testimony
548
Agency of Desire in producing conviction
549
Hope Fear Despondency it 21 Religious Faith
551
How can we be said to believe in things beyond the scope of possible action ?
553
Belief in our own sensations present and past
554
Prevalent meanings of the term Consciousness
555
General tendency of the several meanings First mental life and its degrees Second the occupa tion of the mind with itself Third Belief
561
CONSCIOUSNESS AS FEELING 1 The Passive States 3 Pleasure and Pain Characteristics of Neutral Excite ment
563
The Active States
565
We are conscious in proportion to the greatness
571
The feeling of difference precedes the operation of
577
A sensation is in every view a conscious element
581
Sensation and perception presupposed
587
Summary of the essentials of Cognition
593
A On the most general physical conditions of Consciousness
599
Meanings of Consciousness Hamilton on the priority
611

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第 168 頁 - Tis now the very witching time of night When churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on.
第 63 頁 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice...
第 249 頁 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
第 172 頁 - rejoice with them that rejoice, and weep with them that weep.
第 12 頁 - I will omit much usual declamation on the dignity and capacity of our nature; the superiority of the soul to the body, of the rational to the animal part of our constitution ; upon the worthiness, refinement, and delicacy, of some satisfactions, or the meanness, grossness, and sensuality, of others ; because 1 hold that pleasures differ in nothing, but in continuance and intensity...
第 424 頁 - When those difficult cases occur, they are difficult, chiefly because, while we have them under consideration, all the reasons pro and con are not present to the mind at the same time ; but sometimes one set present themselves, and at other times another, the first being out of sight. Hence the various purposes or inclinations that alternately prevail, and the uncertainty that perplexes us.
第 115 頁 - Whenever we are led to consider ourselves as the authors of any effect, we feel a sensible pride or exultation in the consciousness of Power ; and the pleasure is, in general, proportioned to the greatness of the effect, compared to the smallness of our exertion.
第 252 頁 - Here thou, great ANNA ! whom three realms obey, Dost sometimes counsel take — and sometimes tea.
第 455 頁 - The peculiarity of the moral habits, contradistinguishing them from the intellectual acquisitions, is the presence of two hostile powers, one to be gradually raised into the ascendant over the other. It is necessary, above all things, in such a situation, never to lose a battle. Every gain on the wrong side undoes the effect of many conquests on the right.
第 49 頁 - We call that fire of the black thunder-cloud 'electricity,' and lecture learnedly about it, and grind the like of it out of glass and silk: but what is it? "What made it? Whence comes it? Whither goes it? Science has done much for us ; but it is a poor science that would hide from us the great deep sacred infinitude of Nescience, whither we can never penetrate, on which all science swims as a mere superficial film.

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