The Roman History: From the Building of Rome to the Ruin of the Commonwealth ...

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C. J. G. and F. Rivington, 1830
 

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第 70 頁 - The first teaches us how to contemn the terrors of death, and to look upon it as a blessing rather than an evil ; the second, to support pain and affliction with a manly fortitude ; the third, to appease all our complaints and uneasinesses under the accidents of life ; the fourth, to moderate all our other passions ; the fifth, to evince the sufficiency of virtue to make man happy.
第 23 頁 - This was his general behaviour : yet, from some particular facts explained above, it appears, that his strength of mind was not always impregnable, but had its weak places of pride, ambition, and party zeal ; which when managed and flattered to a certain point, would betray him sometimes into measures, contrary to his ordinary rule or right and truth.
第 245 頁 - ... deities'* : a rank which he would have preserved to this day, if he had happened to live in papal Rome, where he could not have failed, as Erasmus says, from " the innocence of his life, of obtaining the honour and title of a saint1.
第 244 頁 - Antony ordered the head to be fixed upon the rostra, between the two hands : a sad spectacle to the city, and what drew tears from every eye ; to see those mangled members, which used to exert themselves so gloriously from that place, in defence of...
第 114 頁 - it should pass with a restriction, proposed by Ser. " Sulpicius ; that no grant, which was to take place " after the Ides of March, should be ratified*." This was generally thought so reasonable, and Antony's seeming candour had made such an impression, that those who saw the mischief of it, durst not venture to oppose it ; especially as there was a precedent for it in the case of Sylla ; and, as it was supposed to relate chiefly to the veteran soldiers, whom it was not possible to oblige, or keep...
第 243 頁 - ... and firmness, which almost daunted them, and thrusting his neck as forwardly as he could out of the litter, he bade them do their work, and take what they wanted : upon which they presently cut oif his head, and both his hands...
第 3 頁 - ... the general's design. His departure occasioned the utmost sadness and consternation among the troops; for being few in number, mostly new levies, and those not all suffered to Land, they saw themselves exposed, upon a foreign coast, to the mighty forces of a crafty nation, supported by an innumerable cavalry. Nor had they any resource in their present circumstances, or expectation of safety in their own conduct; but derived all their hope from the alacrity...
第 113 頁 - Cicero, as the best foundation of a lasting quiet, moved the assembly in the first place, after the example of Athens, to decree a general amnesty, or act of oblivion, for all that was passed, to which they unanimously agreed. Antony seemed to be all goodness, talked of nothing but healing measures, and, for a proof of his sincerity, moved, that the conspirators should be invited to take part in their deliberations...
第 136 頁 - The senate met the next morning, to which he was particularly summoned by Antony; but excused himself by a civil message, as being too much indisposed by the fatigue of his journey— Antony took this as an affront, and in great rage threatened openly in the senate to order his house to be pulled down, if he did not come immediately; till by the interposition of the assembly he was dissuaded from using any violence — The...
第 73 頁 - By this evacuation before eating, they were prepared to eat more plentifully ; and, by emptying themselves presently after it, prevented any hurt from repletion. Thus Vitellius, who was a famous glutton, is said to have preserved his life by constant vomits, while he destroyed all his companions, who did not use the same caution (Sueton. 12. Dio, 65. 734.) : and the practice was thought so effectual for strengthening the constitution, that it was the constant regimen of all the athlete, or professed...

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