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Green. Here!

Ralph. Let me see your piece,1 neighbour [20 Greengoose: when was she shot in?

Geen. An't like you, master captain, I made a shot even now, partly to scour her, and partly for audacity.

Ralph. It should seem so certainly, for her [25 breath is yet inflamed; besides, there is a main2 fault in the touch-hole, it runs and stinketh; and I tell you moreover, and believe it, ten such touch-holes would breed the pox in the army. Get you a feather, neighbour, get you [30 a feather, sweet oil, and paper, and your piece may do well enough yet. Where's your powder? Green. Here.

Ralph. What, in a paper! As I am a soldier and a gentleman, it craves a martial court! [35 You ought to die for 't. Where's your horn? Answer me to that.

Green. An't like you, sir, I was oblivious.

Ralph. It likes me not you should be so ; 't is a shame for you, and a scandal to all our [40 neighbours, being a man of worth and estimation, to leave your horn behind you: I am afraid 't will breed example. But let me tell you no more on 't. - Stand, till I view you all. What's become o' th' nose of flask? 45 your 1 Sold. Indeed, la, captain, 'twas blown away with powder.

Ralph. Put on a new one at the city's charge. Where's the stone of this piece?

2 Sold. The drummer took it out to light [50 tobacco.

Ralph. 'Tis a fault, my friend; put it in again. You want a nose, and you a stone. - Sergeant, take a note on 't, for I mean to stop it in the pay. Remove, and march! [They [58 march.] Soft and fair, gentlemen, soft and fair! Double your files! As you were! Faces about! Now, you with the sodden face, keep in there! Look to your match, sirrah, it will be in your fellow's flask anon. So; make a crescent now: [60 advance your pikes: stand and give ear! Gentlemen, countrymen, friends, and my fellowsoldiers, I have brought you this day, from the shops of security and the counters of content, to measure out in these furious fields honour by [s the ell, and prowess by the pound. Let it not, oh, let it not, I say, be told hereafter, the noble issue of this city fainted; but bear yourselves in this fair action like men, valiant men, and free men! Fear not the face of the enemy, nor the noise of the guns, for, believe me, brethren, the rude rumbling of a brewer's car is far more terrible, of which you have a daily experience; neither let the stink of powder offend you, since a more valiant stink is nightly with

you.

To a resolved mind his home is every-where: I speak not this to take away

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The hope of your return; for you shall see (I do not doubt it) and that very shortly Your loving wives again and your sweet children,

Whose care doth bear you company in baskets.

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[SCENE III.] 8

Enter MERRYthought.

Mer. Yet, I thank God, I break not a writ kle more than I had. Not a stoop, boys? Care, live with cats; I defy thee! My heart is a sound as an oak; and though I want drink to wet my whistle, can sing; [Sings.]

Come no more there, boys, come no more there;
For we shall never whilst we live come any more there
Enter Boy, [and two Men] with a Coffin.
Boy. God save you, sir!

Mer. It's a brave boy. Canst thon sing?
Boy. Yes, sir, I can sing; but 't is not so [
necessary at this time.
Mer. [sings.]

Sing we, and chant it; Whilst love doth grant it.

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Jasp. By my troth, sir, I ne'er came there; 't is too hot for me, sir.

Mer. A merry ghost, a very merry ghost!
[Sings]

And where is your true love? Oh, where is yours?
Band. • Weapons.
The Lord Mayor's barge.
8 A room in Merrythought's house. • Tankard.

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And some they whistled, and some they sung,
Hey, down, down!

And some did loudly say,

Ever as the Lord Barnet's horn blew,
Away, Musgrave, away!

Mist. Mer. [within.] You will not have us starve here, will you, Master Merrythought? Jasp. Nay, good sir, be persuaded; she is my mother.

If her offences have been great against you,
Let your own love remember she is yours,
And so forgive her.

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Luce. Good Master Merrythought. Let me entreat you; I will not be denied. Mist. Mer. [within.] Why, Master Merry- [60 thought, will you be a vext thing still?

Mer. Woman, I take you to my love again; but yon shall sing before you enter; therefore despatch your song and so come in.

Mist. Mer. [within.] Well, you must have [65 your will, when all 's done. - Mick, what song canst thou sing, boy?

Mich. [within.] I can sing none, forsooth, but A Lady's Daughter, of Paris properly. Mist. Mer. [Song.]

It was a lady's daughter, &c.

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[MERRYTHOUGHT opens the Door; enter MisTRESS MERRYTHOUGHT and MICHAEL.] Me.. Come, you're welcome home again.

[Sings.]

If such danger be in playing, And jest must to earnest turn, You shall go no more a-mayingVent. (within.) Are you within, sir? Master [75 Merrythought!

Jasp. It is my master's voice! Good sir, go hold him

In talk, whilst we convey ourselves into
Some inward room.

[Exit with LUCE.]
Mer.
What are you? Are you merry
You must be very merry, if you enter.
Vent. [within.] I am, sir.
Sing, then.

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1 Nay, good sir, open to me. by the merry heart, you

. Qq.

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[MERRYTHOUGHT opens the Door TUREWELL.]

Mer. You are welcome, sir, you you see your entertainment; F merry.

Vent. Oh, Master Merrythough

to ask you

Forgiveness for the wrongs I offere And your most virtuous son! They Yet my contrition shall be more tha

nd

9. 224 bat

do confess my hardness broke his hea For which just Heaven hath given me punish

ment

More than my age can carry. His wand'ring spirit,

Not yet at rest, pursues me every where,
Crying, "I'll haunt thee for thy cruelty."
My daughter, she is gone, I know not how,
Taken invisible, and whether living
Or in [the] grave, 't is yet uncertain to me.
Oh, Master Merrythought, these
weights

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are the

Will sink me to my grave! Forgive me, sir. Mer. Why, sir, I do forgive you; and be

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I then returned home, and thrust myself
In action, and by all men chosen was
Lord of the May, where I did flourish it,
With scarfs and rings, and posy in my hand.
After this action I preferred was,
And chosen city-captain at Mile-End,
With hat and feather, and with leading-staff,2
And train'd my men, and brought them all off
clear,

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Save one man that beray'd him with the noise.

But all these things I Ralph did undertake
Only for my beloved Susan's sake.
Then coming home, and sitting in my shop 185
With apron blue, Death came into my stall
To cheapen aqua vitae; but ere I
Could take the bottle down and fill a taste,
Death caught a pound of pepper in his hand,
And sprinkled all my face and body o'er,
And in an instant vanished away.

Cit. 'Tis a pretty fiction, i' faith.

170

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meet,

And pluck down houses of iniquity; 5 —
My pain increaseth - I shall never more
Hold open, whilst another pumps both legs,
Nor daub a satin gown with rotten eggs;
Set up a stake, oh, never more I shall !
I die! fly, fly, my soul, to Grocers' Hall!
Oh, oh, oh, &c.

Wife. Well said, Ralph! do your obeisance to the gentlemen, and go your ways: wil said, Ralph!

RALPH [rises, makes obeisance and exit.

Mer. Methinks all we, thus kindly and unerpectedly reconciled, should not depart without

a song.

Vent. A good motion.

Mer. Strike up, then!

SONG.

Better music ne'er was known Than a choir of hearts in one. Let each other, that hath been Troubled with the gall or spleen, Learn of us to keep his brow

7

Smooth and plain, as ours are now :
Sing, though before the hour of dying;
He shall rise, and then be crying,
"Hey, ho, 't is nought but mirth
That keeps the body from the earth!"

EPILOGUS.

Exeunt.

Cit. Come, Nell, shall we go? The play's done.

Wife. Nay, by my faith, George, I have more manners than so; I'll speak to these gentlemen first. I thank you all, gentlemen, for ne your patience and countenance to Ralph, a poor fatherless child; and if I might see you at my house, it should go hard but I would have a pottle of wine and a pipe of tobacco for you: for, truly, I hope you do like the youth, but s I would be glad to know the truth; I refer it to your own discretions, whether you will appland him or no; for I will wink, and whilst you shall do what you will. I thank you with all my heart. God give you good night! - Come, [zs George. [Exeunt.]

As the London prentices did on Shrove Tuesday. Cf. the speech of Andrea's Ghost in The Spanish Tragedy, I. i., many lines of which are here parodied. 7 Part. 8 Meanwhile.

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ACT I

SCENE I.2

[DRAMATIS PERSONAE

Two Woodmen.

The King's Guard and Train.

ARETHUSA, Daughter of the King.

nd

is. 224 hat

EUPHRASIA, Daughter of Dion, but disguised like a Page and called BELLARIO.

MEGRA, á lascivious Lady.

GALATEA, a wise, modest Lady attending the Princess. Two other Ladies.

SCENE.-Sicily.]1

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some blood in those wars, which I would give my hand to be washed from.

Cle. Sir, my ignorance in state-policy will not let me know why, Philaster being heir to one [35 of these kingdoms, the King should suffer him to walk abroad with such free liberty.

Dion. Sir, it seems your nature is more constant than to inquire after state-news. But the King, of late, made a hazard of both the [0 kingdoms, of Sicily and his own, with offering but to imprison Philaster; at which the city was in arms, not to be charm'd down by any state-order or proclamation, till they saw Philaster ride through the streets pleas'd and [45 without a guard: at which they threw their hats and their arms from them; some to make bonfires, some to drink, all for his deliverance: which wise men say is the cause the King labours to bring in the power of a foreign nation to awe his own with.

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Of any dams, were she a queen, whose eye Speaks common loves and comforts to her se

Last, noble son (for so I now must call you),
What I have done thus public, is not only
To add a comfort in particular

To you or me, but all; and to confirm
The nobles and the gentry of these kingdoms
By oath to your succession, which shall be
Within this month at most.

Thra. This will be hardly done.
Cle. It must be ill done, if it be done.
Dion. When 't is at best, 't will be but half
done, whilst

So brave a gentleman is wrong'd and flung off.
Thra. I fear.

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doms;

You in me have your wishes. Oh, this country!
By more than all the gods, I hold it happy;
Happy in their dear memories that have been
Kings great and good; happy in yours that is;
And from you (as a chronicle to keep
Your noble name from eating age) do I
Opine myself most happy. Gentlemen,
Believe me in a word, a prince's word,
There shall be nothing to make up a kingdom
Mighty and flourishing, defenced, fear'd,
Equal to be commanded and obeyed,

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But through the travails of my life I'll find it,
And tie it to this country. By all the gods,
My reign shall be so easy to the subject,
That every man shall be his prince himself,
And his own law-yet I his prince and
And dearest lady, to your dearest self
(Dear in the choice of him whose name and les

tre

.

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Cle. This speech calls him Spaniard, being nothing but a large inventory of his own com mendations.

Dion. I wonder what's his price; for eer tainly He'll sell himself, he has so prais'd his shape.

: Lovers.

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