The London Magazine, Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer, 第 38 卷

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R. Baldwin, 1769
 

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第259页 - For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened: not for that we would be unclothed, but clothed upon, that mortality might be swallowed up of life.
第473页 - ... as the encroachments of prerogative. He would be as little capable of bargaining with the minister for places for himself or his dependents, as of descending to mix himself in the intrigues of opposition.
第365页 - With what force, my lord, with what protection are you prepared to meet the united detestation of the people of England? The city of London has given a generous example to the kingdom in what manner a king of this country ought to be...
第476页 - As little acquainted with the rules of decorum as with the laws of morality, they will not suffer you to profit by experience, nor even to consult the propriety of a bad character. Even now they tell you, that life is no more than a dramatic scene, in which the hero should preserve his consistency to the last, and that, as you lived without virtue, you should die without repentance.
第307页 - Is any thing more common than to see our ladies of qua'lity wear such high shoes as they cannot walk in without one to lead them ; and a gown as long again as their body, so that they cannot stir to the next room without a page or two to hold it up...
第475页 - He must create a solitude round his estate if he would avoid the face of reproach and derision. At Plymouth his destruction would be more than probable; at Exeter, inevitable.
第473页 - Conscious of his own weight and importance, his conduct in parliament would be directed by nothing but the constitutional duty of a peer.
第26页 - That the ladies' summer hats, however, should be lined with black, as not reverberating on their faces those rays which are reflected upwards from the earth or water ? That the putting a white cap of paper or linen within the crown of a black hat, as some...
第474页 - He would never have been insulted with virtues which he had laboured to extinguish, nor suffered the disgrace of a mortifying defeat, which has made him ridiculous and contemptible, even to the few by whom he was not detested.
第473页 - His authority would either sanctify or disgrace the measures of government. The people would look up to him as to their protector, and a virtuous prince would have one honest man in his dominions in whose integrity and judgment he might safely confide. If it should be the will of Providence to afflict him with a domestic misfortune, he would submit to the stroke, with feeling but not without dignity.

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