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RICHMOND BRIDGE.

101

From Richmond Terrace, the elegant bridge which is here thrown across the Thames, appears embosomed in woods ; and this circumstance gave the poet occasion

forth the following picturesque lines :

to pour

Mark where yon beauteous Bridge, with modest pride,
Throws its broad shadow o'er the subject tide ;
There attic elegance and strength inite,
And fair proportion's charms the eye delight;
There graceful, while the spacious arches bend,
No useless glaring ornaments offend ;
Embower'd in verdure, heap'd uubonnded round,
Of every varied hue that shades the ground;
Its polish'd surface of unsullied white,
With heighten'd lustre beams upon the sight,
Still lovelier in the shining food survey'd
'Mid the deep masses of surrounding shade!

What adds materially to the charms of the prospect, is the sight of carriages bowling across the bridge from one side of the river to the other, whilst the heavy-laden barge, and the light airy pleasure-boat, are passing each other below without intermission

Glittering with brilliant tints and burnished gold,
Above the cars of luxury are roll’d,
Or commerce, that upholds the wealthy thané,
Guides to Augusta's tow'rs her cumb'rous wain.
Below refulgent in the noon-tide ray,
While in the breeze the silken streamers play,
A thousand

nd barks array’d in gorgeous pride,
Bound o'er the surface of the yielding tide!

ha The inhabitants of this part of the country are

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THE PATRIOTIC JOHN LEWIS.

much indebted to Mr. John Lewis, of Richmond, brother of Dr. Lewis, the celebrated physician, author of that valuable work, The Philosophical Commerce of Arts. The beauty and convenience of this terrestrial paradise (says the late Gilbert Wakefield), were essentially impaired by having the footway shut up through Richmond Park to Wimbledon, East Sheen, and Kingston, and no passage allowed without a ticket. Lewis takes a friend with himn to the spot, waits for the opportunity of a carriage passing through, and when the door-keeper was shutting the gates, interposed and offered to go in. 66 Where is

your

ticket?” “ What occasion for a ticket? any body may pass through here.“No, not without a ticket.” “Yes, they may, and I will." You sha'n't.” 66 I will." The woman pushed; Lewis suffered the door to be shut upon him, brought his action, and was triumphant.

The cause was tried at the Surry assizes, before that upright judge Sir Michael Foster. After the decree in his favour, Lewis was asked whether he would have a step-ladder to go over the wall, or a door. He hesitated for some minutes, but reflecting that strangers might not be aware of the privilege of admission through a door, which could not stand open on account of the deer; considering also, that in process of time a bolt might be put to this door, and then a lock, and so his efforts gradually frustrated ; sensible too, thát a step-ladder, at the first inspection, would signify its use to every beholder, be preferred that mode of introduetion. In mere spite, the steps

THE PATRIOTIC JOHN LEWIS.

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of this ladder were set at such a distance from each other, as rendered it almost useless. At a subseqeunt period, when the same judge happened to go the Home Circuit, Lewis complained again to the court. “ My Lord,” says he, “ they have left such a space between the steps of the ladder, that children and old men are unable to get up it.” “I have observed it myself,” says this honest Justice, “ and I desire, Mr. Lewis, that you would see it so constructed, that not only children and old men, but old women too, may

be able to get up!"

conclude by remarking, that Richmond has been for ages the theme of admiration for the pleasantness of its situation, the richness of its scenery, and the diversity of its prospects. For some beautiful lines which I have introduced as descriptive of it, I acknowledge myself indebted to an elegant Poem, denominated Richmond Hill, and written by the Rev. T. Maurice, the celebrated author of Indian Antiquities; it enters copiously into its early history, and communicates interesting particulars respecting it. It is also decorated by two curious plates, copied from paintings two hundred years old ; the one is a representation of its ANCIENT PALACE, the other a view. of Richmond with its Ferry; and on the opposite side is seen a company of Morrice-duncers, fantastically drest up, exhibiting their feats of agility. This species of diversion was prevalent in the days of Elizabeth, forming a singular contrast with the

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PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS.

more refined entertainments of modern times, and yet our public amusements still leave ample room for improvement.

I am,

My dear young Friend,

Yours, &c.

J. E.

LETTER IV.

THE THAMES AT RICHMOND BRIDGE; ENJOYMENT OF RURAL

BEAUTIES; BISHOP BERKELEY; TEMPLE, WITH ITS INSCRIPTION; HOPE, CONNECTED WITH RELIGION AND THE SUPREME BEING; TWICKENHAM; ITS POPULATION; THE CHURCU, WITH ITS MONUMENTS; ESPECIALLY TO POPE'S MEMORY; PARENTS OF POPE; THEIR TABLET, WITH INSCRIPTION TO POPE'S OWN MEMORY; POPB's NURSE; HER STONE AND INSCRIPTION; The PERSON AND DRESS OF POFB; THE HOUSE OF POPE; LAWN AND WEEPING WILLOWS; BUSTS OF STANHOPE AND CHESTERFIELD; POPE'S OBELISK TO HIS MOTHER; HIS GROTTO, WITH A DBSCRIPTION IN PROSE AND POETRY; LORD ORRERY'S COMMENDATION OF Pope's HOSPITALITY; pope's BIOGRAPHY; POPE's THREE PRINCIPAL FRIENDS, BOLINGBROKE, ATTERBURY AND WARBURTON, WITH ANECDOTES; CONCLUSION.

Islington, July, 1810. MY DEAR YOUNG FRIEND,

QUITTING Richmond and its fascinating vicinity, we rolled along over the bridge, gazing sometimes on one side, and sometimes on the other, for our attention was attracted by the limpid stream that flowed beneath its arches, and the light skiffs upon its surface, with their gay streamers full of genteel and well-dressed company. From the continuity of Aowing water, Horace bas derived a charming simile, thus con.

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