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CONTENTS.

CHAP. I.-INTRODUCTORY OBSERVATIONS ON EXERCISE AND

REST. 1.-Exercise and its opposite considered, ordained

by Providence in wisdom and mercy. 2.-Man's conse-

quent Appetite for. 3.-Activity needful for bodily health,

4.- Respiration of pure air. 5.- Inactivity baneful.

6.-Locomotion intended. 7.–Carriages for invalids or

business. 8.-Mountaineers healthy from walking so
much. 9.-Equitation considered. 10-Purpose of

the subjoined general and special remarks.

CHAP. II.-SEASONS, PREPARATIONS NEEDFUL AND VARIOUS.

11.—Diverse tastes. 12.-Summer. 13.-Spring. 14.-

Autumn. 15.-Winter. 16.-Preparatory details. 17.

-Training needful. 18.-Mode of setting about this.

19.—Care of the feet. 20.-Corns attended to. 21.-

Bunnions described-mode of remedying both. 22.-

Chilblains, how to prevent and treat. 23.-Nails care
of. 24.-Riding toes. 25.-Nails hooked. 26.-Im-
moderate perspiration-cause-aggravation by want of
cleanliness and proper attention to feet. 27.-Healthy
feet, perspiration of-requires change of stockings.

Col. Shaw's method of dressing the feet preparatory to

walking. 28.-Cautions.

CHAP. III.-ACCOUTREMENTS, INDICATIONS FOR, KIND OF * *

29.--Swelling of feet, adaptation of shoes and boots to.

30.–Stockings and socks, Col. Shaw's directions as to

quality, mode of make, &c. 31.-Socks, generally pre-

ferred by author; injurious plan of gartering to hold up

stockings. 32.-Wool as a material preferable, cotton

and silk, Dr. Mackintosh's opinion, Midge pattern fash-

ionable for good reasons, allusion to Frontispiece em-

blem. 33.—Shoes and boots considered-mode of con-

struction, recommendations of Pedestrian writerspreserving elasticity after being wet, oiling, &c. 34.Shoes straight, rights and lefts, reason for latter mode. 35.--Broad toes, long. 36.-Fitted to arch of foot. 37. -Oxford shoe. 38.-Buckle shoe recommended, and etching of described, retention of shape, comfort and support in walking, influence of a well made and properly fitted shoe on the gait. 39.—Patent Impilia shoes

and boots. 40.--Pumps for slippers. CHAP. IV.-ACCOUTREMENTS CONTINUED-CAP A PIED * * *

41.-Coats, frock-coat, advantages of. 42.--Shooting Jackets, convenience of for a short tour. 42.-Velveteen, plaid, and other kinds. 43.-Water-proof coats their pretensions discussed. 44.—Pockets packed-weight thrown for light porterage. 45.–Fit of coat, easy 46.-Waistcoat, double. 47.-Cravat, worn unloosed. 48. -Pantaloons, gaiters. 49.-Shirts. 50.-Caps, Hats. 51.-Knapsacks described, Col. Shaw's regulation plan. 52.-Cloaks, wide-waterproofed, double use. 53.

Walking-stick, umbrella. 54.-Gloves, &c. CHAP. V. THE START-FIRST DAY'S PERFORMANCES-MEAL

TIMES, REPOSE. 55.-Companionship recommended. 56.--Allotment of first exercise--reasons.57.--Early rising, inducements to. 58.-Breakfast. 59,-Singing and loud talking beneficial. 60.-Thirst, preventive,-methods of relief. 61.-Hunger entails the need of fixing dinner-time, and halting at best quarters-Drinking fermented liquors. 62.-Sleeping after meals, cautions. 63.-Smoking and its twin-sister snuffing. 64.–Storm, conduct in-trees bad for shelter. 65.—Housed, Tea.

66.-ReposeBeds if damp, directions. Conclusion. CHAP. VI.-SUPPLEMENT.-Further cautions, directions, Extracts

hygienic - Walking, - Swimming-Diet-Sleep, &c.— Scraps for Reflections—Poetical Gleanings—Books of Reference,

CHAPTER 1.

" Health is the vital principle of bliss,

And exercise of health. In proof of this,
Behold the wretch who slugs his life away,
Soon swallow'd in disease's sad abyss;

While he whom toil has braced, or manly play,
Has light as air each limb, each thought as clear as day.

Thomson's Castle of Indolence. INTRODUCTORY OBSERVATIONS. 1. Exercise and Rest may be said to be the poles around which are found perpetually revolving all the varieties of the animated globe. Or again, we may resolve the electric conditions of our animal organization into positive and negative poles; for we shall find that as we recede from the one state we approach the other ;-as we trace up all the lower forms of life, with their limited location and powers,-as we recede from the negative, we approximate nearer and nearer to the antagonizing positive, wherein more perfect capacities are adapted for more energetic efforts, and where, consequently, an almost ceaseless activity reigns. And here we see Man, the crown of all creation's works, lying under the curse pronounced by the Almighty upon original transgression, with his frame beauteously fitted for activity, appointed to sweat under needful toil in order to earn his daily food. Yet the appetite for exertion is found gratefully alleviating the penalty of the primeval sentence : so that, in fact, restless man experiences far more of a curse in idleness and fruitless inactivity, than he actually realizes under the existing urgent instigations to their opposite. Thus may we be reconciled to, and even rejoice over, that election of the kindlier alternative which heaven has made for us in recording her penal sentence attempered with mercy.

2. Man, therefore, loves exertion; not only does his present condition demand and sue for it, but his constitution rejoices in it: and most true it ever has been, and will be, that rest itself is only to be enjoyed in succession to activity-ease is alone relished - sleep is only gratefully welcome-after that

"Toil which does keep
Obstructions from the mind and quench the blood;
Ease but belongs to us like sleep, and sleep,
Like opium, is our medicine, not our food."

Sir W. D'Adenant's Gondibert. 3. Activity is essential to the health of every organ of the body, for, through the use and exercise of the muscular system, the functions of the whole compound being are efficiently discharged the circulating system is developed and maintained in its requisite force, and in harmony with the nervous as well as nutritive or assimilative systems—the brain receives its nicely-balanced supply—the lungs are expanded, so as to have their inherent elasticities called forth ; whilst the heart, acquiring full tone and energy, as the fountain of life, again returns the vital currents back to those muscles, and throughout the varied framework of the body, in order to evolve their corresponding requisite development.

4. Let us add to the benefits of this muscular exercise, the respiration of the pure mountain air,

“ High on the breeze's ridge, whose lofty sides

The ethereal deep with endless billows chafes,-" giving thereby fresh life to the blood, and that sparkling glow of colour to the cheek which is alternately discarded and admired, as “rude health,” by the capriciously varying tastes of society. Let the mind be emancipated from corrosive care, and in its stead be clad with that cheerfulness which the "country" so invariably excites,

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