Power, Plain English, and the Rise of Modern Poetry

封面
Yale University Press, 2008年10月1日 - 224 頁
DIVIn this engaging book David Rosen offers a radically new account of Modern poetry and revises our understanding of its relation to Romanticism. British poets from Wordsworth to Auden attempted to present themselves simultaneously as persons of power and as moral voices in their communities. The modern lyric derives its characteristic complexities—psychological, ethical, formal—from the extraordinary difficulty of this effort.
The low register of our language—a register of short, concrete, native words arranged in simple syntax—is deeply implicated in this story. Rosen shows how the peculiar reputation of “plain English” for truthfulness is employed by Modern poets to conceal the rift between their (probably irreconcilable) ambitions for themselves. 
With a deep appreciation for poetic accomplishment and a wonderful iconoclasm, Rosen sheds new light on the innovative as well as the self-deceptive aspects of Modern poetry. This book alters our understanding of the history of poetry in the English language./div
 

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內容

The Secret Reference of John Locke
15
Wordsworths Empirical Imagination
33
Certain Good W B Yeats and the Language of Autobiography
73
The Lost Youth of Modern Poetry T S Eliot W H Auden
123
Notes
181
Index
201
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