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Landing of Troops there 663Firmness of the Council and Selectmen 664Public Feeling
672
Americans 676James Otis Disabled 677Troops in Boston 678Interference with Popular
687
Tryon and the Regulators 690A Battle on the Alamance 691Cruelty of the Governor 691
691
Crownofficers in America made Independent of the Assemblies 693Obnoxious Letters
699
706The Boston Port Bill 706Opposition of Burke and others 707Charles James Fox
706
Adopted 709Apprehensions of the Ministry 710The Petition for the Removal of Hutchin
714
CHAPTER X
715
People 720Preparations for a General Congress 721Doings in New York 722Minute
728
with Religious Services 734Personal Sketches of the Members 734Hospitalities of Phila
738
Destruction of Tea at Annapolis 743Provincial Congress of Massachusetts Formed 744
744
Preparations for Civil Government and War 745The Country and Events West of the Alle
750
CHAPTER XIII
757
North and the Cabinet 759Policy toward the Americans 760Franklin admitted to
767
774Military Expedition to Concord 775Skirmish at Lexington
778
March for Boston 788Fight at West Cambridge 788Panic at Charlestown 788Account
789
Rule Abolished 793Mecklenberg Declaration of Independence 794Call for Troops
795
tinental Congress 800Declarations of their Views and Intentions 800Petitions and
806
CHAPTER XVII
810
818Preparations to Besiege Quebec
821
General Hospital 826The Army Before Boston 826Committee of Congress 826Insub
828
CHAPTER XIX
834
Provinces in 1775 837Exciting Scenes in Virginia 838Battle at Great Bridge 838Destruc
844
CHAPTER XX
846
Retreat of the Americans from Quebec 850Affair at the Cedars 850Death of General
852
CHAPTER XXI
860
Paine and His Common Sense 864Independence in Congress and Elsewhere 865Silas
866
CHAPTER XXII
872
Arrival of British Forces before New York 874Peace Commissioners Foiled 875Lord
880
New York 886The United States and France 886Beaumarchais in England 887Com
890
Fort Washington 894Prisonships and their Victims
896
904The British Army in New Jersey 904Capture of Hessians at Trenton 905Effects of
904
The Mischianza p 985The British Evacuate Philadelphia 987Distress of the Tories
987
The American Army 987Oath of Allegiance 988Lafayette outgenerals the British Com
993
Major Clarke 1001British Forays 1002The British Invade Georgia 1003Relative Position
1004
CHAPTER XXXIII
1010
Savannah 1012Battle at Stono Ferry 1012Character of the Invasion 1012British Maraud
1019
around Ireland 1025Doings on the American Coast 1026Loss of British Vessels 1026
1026
off the Coast of Scotland 1028His Rewards 1032The King and Parliament 1032Ireland
1035
DeKalb 1041Gates in Command 1041Exploits of Sumter and Marion and other Parti
1046
Hamilton and Miss Schuyler 1050British Invasion of New Jersey 1051Murder of
1052
Progress of his Treason 1053Interview between Arnold and Andre 1054Capture
1059
Laurens and a French Loan 1064Articles of Confederation 1065A Bank Established
1065
Greene Chased by Cornwallis 1068Battle at Guilford Courthouse 1070Fox and Pitt
1072
Augusta 1078Siege of Fort Ninetysix 1078Greene Raises the Siege and Pursues Rawdon
1079
Hayne 1080Greene Pursues Stewart 1081Battle at Eutaw Springs 1081Greene Returns
1088
Various Military Movements 1091Washington adopts his Stepsons Children 1091Affairs
1094
Peace 1098Washingtons Farewell Addresses 1099The Two Armies 1099Evacuation
1100
and the Result 1021
1101
Society of the Cincinnati 1105Weakness of the New Government 1105The Opinions
1110
CHAPTER I
1119
Visits His Mother 1121His Journey to New York 1121Reception at Philadelphia Trenton
1128
Thanksgiving Day Appointed p 1133The Presidents Journey into New England 1133
1133
Vermont and Kentucky enter the Union 1139First Census 1139Wars with the Indians
1140
with the Revolutionists 1146His Suspicions 1147Jefferson and Hamilton at Variance
1147
Citizen Genet and the Republicans1147Proclamation of Neutrality 1147The Whisky
1155
roe in France 1159Refusal to receive an American Minister 1159A Savage Decree 1159
1159
Bonaparte in the East 1163New Envoys to France 1163A Conspiracy 1164Bonaparte
1169
1173Condition of the Government 1175Affairs Abroad 1175Difficulties with the Barbary
1173
Powers 1175Our Navy 1176War with the Barbary Powers 1176Growth of the Republic
1180
cably Settled
1184
Embargo Act n89Tribute to Great Britain Demanded n89Opposition to the Embargo
1190
Napoleon 1192President and Little Belt 1192The Two Navies 1193Trouble with
1196

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第 791 頁 - Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat, but in submission and slavery. Our chains are forged, their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston. The war is inevitable; and let it come ! I repeat it, sir, let it come ! It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry Peace, peace!
第 792 頁 - Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!
第 775 頁 - If the British march By land or sea from the town to-night, Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch Of the North Church tower as a signal light, — One, if by land, and two, if by sea ; And I on the opposite shore will be, Ready to ride and spread the alarm Through every Middlesex village and farm, For the country folk to be up and to arm.
第 1121 頁 - ... the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained, and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government are justly considered as deeply, perhaps as finally staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.
第 629 頁 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people, so dead to all the feelings of liberty as voluntarily to submit to be slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of the rest.
第 790 頁 - Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with those warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love?
第 760 頁 - Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God afraid of me: Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Throne, Yet touched and shamed by ridicule alone.
第 791 頁 - There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone ; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave.
第 871 頁 - ... free and independent States; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved ; and that, as free and independent States, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and do all other acts and things which independent States may of right do.
第 1121 頁 - I dwell on this prospect with every satisfaction which an ardent love for my country can inspire, since there is no truth more thoroughly established than that there exists in the economy and course of nature an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness, between duty and advantage, between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity...

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