Opera, en anglois, avec notes par P. Shaw, 第 2 卷

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The bºight of the atmºſphere con
40
p
65
The manner wherein this colour
69
The produćlion of a blue colour
73
Different effects of an acid in
80
The chymical reaſon of this pheno
85
A free enquiry into the vulgar
106
Experiments to ſhew the mature
114
An enquiry into the final cauſes
150
Evident marks of deſign in the ſiru
161
Grapes in common air
162
Grapes with ſpirit of wine 579
164
Peaches in air with ſpirit of wine 10
165
Paſte with leaven in common air 575
167
Revelation allows us to ſpeak more
168
Paſte with ſpirit of wine
169
17o Paſte without ſpirit of wine 576
171
Peaſe with ſpirit of wine in an exhauſted receiver 577
172
Peaſe without ſpirit of wine in an exhauſted receiver
173
That the effečis of artificial air differ from thoſe of the common ſhewn in cherries
174
As to the celeſtial bodies
175
Grapes in common air 579
176
Oranges in common and faāitious 417
177
Beef in fačlitious air 581
179
18o Onions in common air ib 18 1 Onions in fačitious air 582
182
Unripe grapes in faāitious air
183
A julyflower in fatiitious air 583
184
In common air
185
w86 julyflowers in vacuo ib 187 Apricocks and plumbs in common qir
187
The ſame in artificial air
188
Plumbs in common air in artifi
189
We ought not to be haſty in conclu
189
Pears in common air p 585
192
Pears in an unſlopt receiver
193
Pears in vacuo
194
Apricocks in common air 586
197
Apricocks in an unexhauſted re ceiver whoſe air was afterwards condenſed 588
198
That the effe 7s of compreſſed air differ from thoſe of the common ſhewn by onions in condenſed air
199
Tulips and larkſpurs in common and compreſſed air
200
Orange in common and compreſſed air
201
Roſes in common and compreſſed air 589
202
Orange in common and compreſſed air 590
203
Shrewmice in common and com preſſed air
204
Flies in common and compreſſed air 59 I
205
Frogs in common and compreſſed air
206
fed air 592
207
Roſes in common and compreſſed air
208
Lemons in common and compreſſed air
209
S E C T II
210
Pears in compreſſed air
212
Pears in common air
213
Pears in vacuo 594
215
A fourth rule
216
A ſhrewmouſe in condenſed
217
218
218
Flies in artificial air of gooſeber
219
ries b 220 Flies included with fire in the artificial air of paſte
220
Flies and Frogs in artificial 59
221
A ſhrewmouſe a ſnail and flies in artificial air of paſte 598
222
A frog in air produced from cher ries
223
Flies and a ſhrewmouſe in arti ficial air of gooſeberries
224
The ſixth and laſt rule for judg
225
A bird and a ſhrewmouſe in ar tificial air of raiſins
226
Shrewmice included in common air
227
Snails in faāitious air of paſte
228
Snails in faāitious air of peaſe
229
Animals in vacuo and firſt a butterfly 6o I
230
Flies in a receiver partially eva cuated
231
Snails in vacuo
232
Flies eggs in vacuo
233
Sulphur vivum fuſed in vacuo
243
Paſle expoſed to the rays of
244
The high veneration mans
264
The wiſdom of God differently
269
Horſebeans and water included 3oo Onions in common air
278
Frogſpawn in vacuo common in vacuo
284
And of oil of vitriol with a fifth Strawberries
292
In all fluids the upper parts gravitate
309
The hydroſtatical balance applied
315
To the Lapis Lazuli
327
A table of the ſpecific gravities
344
Demonſtrated by experiments
353
at great depths P
354
An adual preſſure at the bottom
358
The preſſure of the airs ſpring
365
Whence the weight of the atmo
368
Experiments to illuſtrate and con
370
and ſºlids 37 2
373
ſnowy and other weather
379
Upon animal ſubſtances
383
S E C T I
388
Paradox III fluid
407
Phyſicomechanical experiments
408
of the
410
And burſt by the ſame 4 I 3
414
And gunpowder fired in vacuo
420
Whether air may be generated
429
In the mutual uſefulneſ of his pro
440
loſe their equilibrium in vacuo
445
odd phenomena of light produced
455
The nature of reſpiration wº
471
little included
476
Mercury raiſed by the ſpring ºf
483
The preſſure of an external fluid will cumbent fluid 3 II
491
Upon viperſ
527
Aſhellfiſh in an exhauffed recei
533
An attempt to prevent the neceſſi
539
Creeping inſes in vacuo
545
S E C T III
555
To filter air thro water
561
From grapes
567
In paſte again
571
And raiſins with water in com 319 Peaches in an infuſion of rai 10
573
In raiſins and vinegar 57 I
581
burningglaſs in vacuo p
605
The produćion of air from grapes in vacuo
606
From figs ib 247 From pears and apricocks ib 248 From cherries
607
From cabbages ib 25o From oranges
608
Apples
609
Paſte ib 258 Gooſeberries 61 I
612
In plumbs in vacuo
613
Gooſeberries in vacuo ib 264 In paſte in vacuo
614
In beans in vacuo
615
In gooſeberries in vacuo
616
In grapes in vacuo
617
In pears in vacuo ib 269 Miſcellaneous experiments and firſt melted lead and tin cooled in VaCuO
618
Radiſhes and claret in vacuo ib 277 A ſmall glaſ tube plunged in wa ter the infuſion of nephritic wood and ſpirit of wine in vacuo ib 2 278 Horſe
621
Onions in vacuo 629 320 Peaches with grapes apples
637
Pears included with the pulp
638
Beef with ſpice included in recei
644
Boiling and diſtillation praśliſed
648
The funicular hypotheſis examined
660
The preſſure and ſpring of the
667
A table of the rarifašion of the
673
Mr Hobbss phyſical dialogue
679
conſidered p 698
698
Glaſ impervious to air 702 2 The cauſe of ſuffion inquired into
713
Whether airpenetrates quickſilver preſſure or elaſticity of the air
719
How water comes to aſcend in alone raiſe liquors in ſuéion
726

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第 221 頁 - I look upon a law as a moral, not a physical cause, as being indeed but a notional thing, according to which, an intelligent and free agent is bound to regulate its actions.
第 300 頁 - Subtract the loss of the heavy body weighed by itself in water, previously known, from the loss sustained by the combined solids. The remainder will be the weight of as much water as is equal in bulk to the lighter body.
第 300 頁 - This result gives the weight of a bulk of water equal to that of the specimen, and by dividing the weight of the specimen in air by this number, the specific gravity is obtained.
第 131 頁 - Motion in falling; and the cause of Fermentation, by which the Heart and Blood of Animals are kept in perpetual Motion and Heat...
第 130 頁 - But by reason of the Tenacity of Fluids, and Attrition of their Parts, and the Weakness of Elasticity in Solids, Motion is much more apt to be lost than got, and is always upon the Decay. For Bodies which are either absolutely hard, or so soft as to be void of Elasticity, will not rebound from one another.
第 131 頁 - Earth are constantly warm'd, and in some places grow very hot; Bodies burn and shine, Mountains take fire, the Caverns of the Earth are blown up, and the Sun continues violently hot and lucid, and warms all things by his Light.
第 308 頁 - I pretended; which was not to prove, that no angel or other immaterial creature could interpose in these cases; for concerning such agents, all that I need say, is, that in the cases proposed we have no need to recur to them.
第 216 頁 - And the more wonderful things he discovers in the works of nature, the more auxiliary proofs he meets with to establish and enforce the argument, drawn from the universe and its parts, to evince that there is a God ; which is a proposition of that vast weight and importance, that it ought to endear every thing to us that is able to confirm it, and afford us new motives to acknowledge and adore the divine Author of things.
第 97 頁 - I must freely observe that, to speak properly, a law being but a notional rule of acting according to the declared will of a superior, it is plain that nothing but an intellectual being can be properly capable of receiving and acting by a law.
第 508 頁 - ... pressure of a mercurial cylinder of about 29 inches, as we are taught by the Torricellian experiment; so here the same air being brought to a degree of density about twice as great as that it had before, obtains a spring twice as strong as formerly. As may appear by its being able to sustain or resist a cylinder of 29 inches in the longer tube, together with the weight of the atmospherical cylinder that leaned upon those 29 inches of mercury; and, as we just now inferred from the Torricellian...

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