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LITERARY CRITICISM.

Hill's (Dr) Practice in the Judicatories of the Church of Scotland 979
ADVENTURES of an Irish Gentleman
33 Howison's (John) Tales of the Colonies

295
Aird's, (Thomas) Captive of Fez

393 Hughes' (Rev. T. S.) Divines of the Church of England
Album, the College

240
Album, the Lady's Poetical
22 Imlah's (J.) May Flowers

85
Alexander, (Alexander) Life of
321 India, Picture of

271
Animals, Characteristic Sketches of
161 Inglis's (Dr) Vindication

183
Breeds of Domestic
61 Ingram's (A.) Mathematics

129
Anderson's (w.) Poetical Aspirations

85 Irvine (P.) on the Law of Entail
Assistant, the Young Cook's
176 Irving's (W.) Life of Columbus

161
Athenæum, the

226
Atlas, the Family Cabinet
296 Jefferson's (T.) Memoirs

83
Jewsbury's (Miss) Three Histories

270
Baines's (Ed.) Companion to the Lakes

356 Jones, Memoirs of Rear Admiral Paul
Balfour's (Alexander) Weeds and Wildflowers
31 Journal, the Edinburgh New Philosophical

187
Bannatyne, Memoirs of George
171 Journal, the Edinburgh, of Science

187, 369
Barker's (E.) Select Orations
177 Journal, the Glasgow Medical

116
Barri, Memoirs of Mad. du

141
Batty's, Lieut.-Col. Select Views
161 Kelty's (Mary Anne) Times of Trial

178
Bayley's (F. W.) Four Years' Residence in the West Indies 356 Kincaid's (Captain) Adventures

158
Beclard's (P.) Anatomy
33 King's Own

326
Belfrage's (Henry) Portrait of John the Baptist

22
Bel's (James) Geography
103, 339 Lander's (R.) Records of Captain Clapperton

140
Bengalee, the
6 Landscape Illustrations of the Waverley Novels

246
Berday's German Grammar
117 Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia

330
Bertha's Visit
102 Leigh's Guide to the Lakes

296
Biber's (E.) Christian Education
7 Letters to Dr R. Hamilton

177
Bicheno's (J. E.) Ireland and its Economy
340 Levi and Sarah

295
Bigsby's (Soph.) Imilda de Lambertazzi
307 Library, the Family-Dramatic Series

275
Blue-Book, the Literary
117 Library, the Family Classical

177, 275
Lower's (Alex.) History of the University of Edinburgh 20 Library, the Family, No. IX.

33
Bowring's (Dr) Poetry of the Magyars
139 Life Dream

128
Boyd's (C.) Guide through Italy
356 Lloyd's Field Sports

335
Brown's (Rev. J.) Remains of the Rev. A. Fisher
102 Lodge's Portraits

115
British Naturalist
371 | Lost Heir

157
Britton's (John) New Bath Guide:

349
M'Cay's (John) Mercator and Felix

247
Calamy's (Dr) Life
29 M.Diarmid's (J.) Sketches

126
Campbell's (Alex.) Perkin Warbeck
309 M'Farlane's (Charles) Armenians

328
Canada-Political and Historical Account of Lower
63 M.Kenzie's (Dr) Ocean, and other Poems

85
Carrick's (John) Life of Wallace
239 M Intosh's (Charles) Flora and Pomona

329
Cases decided in the Court of Session
330 Magazine, Fraser's, No. I.

90
Catechism of Useful Knowledge

286
-, No. II.

176
Chambers's (Robert) Life of James the First

363
-, No. IV.

274
Chesterfield, the New
65 Magazine, the Paisley

142
Clarkson's (Edward) Robert Montgomery and his Reviewers 356 Magazine, the Elgin Literary

ib.
Clark's (J.) Parochial Psalmody
90 Magazine, the London University

176
Cloudesley
201 Magazine, the Family

274
Coffee-drinker's Manual
64 Main's (James) Villa and Cottage Florist's Dictionary

296
Coleridge's (S. T.) Constitution of Church and State
303 Manners of the Day

175
Coleridge's (H. N.) Introduction to the Study of the Greek Mather's (James) Account of the ship Life-Boat

161
Classic Poets
339 Maturin's (Rev. C. R.) Osmyn

242
Colman's
Random Records
138 Melodies, Peninsular

185
Connel's (Sir J.) Treatise on Tithes
340 Memoirs of the Tower of London

117
Conversations on Chronology
177 Memoirs of a Gentlewoman of the Old School

306
Cortes, Life of Hernan

Memorandum Book, the Edinburgh

10
Courses, Three, and
a Dessert :
301 Millar's (James) History of Dunbar

116
34 Mirror of the Graces

15
Crabb's (Geo.)
Dictionary of General Knowledge
157 Monopoly Question, the East India

128
Cullen's (Dr) Methodical Nosology
35 Monro, Life of Sir J.

99
Cunningham's (Allan) Lives of the most Eminent Painters, &c. Monsieur Tonson

61
101, 112, 338 Montgomery's (R.) Satan
Moore's (D.) Scenes from the Flood

19
Darnley
89 Moore's (Thom.) Life of Lord Byron

43
Darwall (Dr) on the Management of infants
275 Moore's (Thom.) Legendary Ballads

175
Dary's (Sir H.) Consolations in Travel
153 Moorsom's (Captain) Letters from Nova Scotia

308
Denounced, the
367 Morehead's (Dr) Dialogues

174
Dillon's (Capt. P.) Narrative of the Discovery of the Fate of

Muir's (Dr) Sermons

159
La Perouse
61 Murray's Arithmetic

310
Domestie Life, A Poem
85 Musée Français

309
Dominie's Legacy

200
Drama brought to the Test of Scriptire
116 Neale's (Rev. E.) Sermons

309
Drearos, the Royal Book of
352 Neele's (H.) English Poetry

5
Duff's (Alex.) Letter, &c.

296 Newland's (Rev. H.) Apology for the Established Church of
Dunlop's (J.) National Intemperance

64
Ireland

23
Dymock's (Dr) New Abridgement of Ainsworth's Dictionary 117 Norton's (The Honourable Mrs) Undying One

353
Eanthe, and other Poems
155 Panorama of the Thames

201
Economy of the Human Body

89 Parnell (Sir H.) on Financial Reform
Economy of the Hands, &c.
35 Paul Clifford

291
Enthusiasm, Natural History of
99 Picture of Stirling

330
Excitement, the

8 Pinnock's Catechisms
Exodus, or the Curse of Egypt

201
85 Pitcairn's Criminal Trials, Part iv.

84

Part V.
Faith's Telescope

273
4 Platt's (Rev. J.) Class Book

128
Ferrier's (Rev. A.) Memoirs of the Rev. W. Wilson
227 Pocket Lawyer, the

371
Findlater's (Rev. C.) Sermons

274 Polar Star, Vol. II.
Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck

23
339, 350 Porson's (Professor) Devil's Walk

201
Forsyth's (R.) Political Fragments
30 Porter's (Miss A. M.) Barony

309
Franciscan, the Dying
359 Portfolio of a Martyr Student

228
Fry's (Caroline) Listener
227 Portrait Gallery, the National

158
Galt's (John) Lawrie Todd

154 Ramsay's (Rev. E. B.) Sermon on the Death of Bishop Sandford 117
Gertrude
245 Ratier (Dr) on Parisian Hospitals

10
Gibbon's (Ed.) Decline and Fall

31 Remarks on Moore's Life of Byron
Gleaner, the Literary
23 Remarks on the State of the University of Cambridge

340
Glengali's (Earl of) Follies of Fashion
100 Review, the Edinburgh, No. C.

141
Gorton's (John) Dictionary

177
No. CI.

294
Greville's (Rob.) Algæ Britannicæ
181 Review, the Foreign Quarterly, No. X.

156
No. XI.

369
Hall's (Mrs S. C.) Chronicles of a School-Room
244 Review, the Foreign, No. X.

188
Hartshorne's (Rev. C.) Book Rarities

176 Review, the Christian
Hemans's (Felicia) Songs of the Affections
366 Review, the North American, No. LxvII.

369

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326

PVGE

Reynold's (G.) Scholar's Introduction

TAGE

36

Robinson's (Jo.) History in all Ages

Institution, Fourth Exhibition of Ancient Paintings in the Royal

356

Roscoe's (Henry) Lives of Eminent Lawyers

103, 121, 116, 205

285

Russel's (Dr) Historical Evidence, &c.

Ninth Exhibition of Modern Pictures in the Royal 296

224

THE DRAMA.

Sang's (Edward) Strictures on sir Henry Stuart's Planters

9 Pages 12, 25, 54, 105, 147, 181, 207, 247, 318, 333, 360, 373.

Theatrical Gossip in every Number.

Guide

112

Savigny's (F.) Civil Lavi

34

ORIGINAL POETRY.

Scoti's (Sir W.) History of Scotland

156

AINSLIE, (Dr) Inscription for a Tomb

135

Scott's (Sir W.) Doom of Devorgoil

338

ALASTOR, TO

362

Scott's (Sir W.) Poetical Works

266, 280

ANDERSON, (WM.) To Zera

302

Seager's (Rev. J.) Bos' Greek Ellipses

270

ATKINSON, (Thos.) O ! this Love! this Love!

93

Selection of Celtic Melodies

330

Set of Ten Songs and Two Duets

Author of the “Opening of the Sixth Seal," The Passage of

199

the Red Sea

Sherwood's (Mrs) Obedience

341

BALFOUR, (ALEX.) Sonnet

248

Sillery's (Charles Doyne) Eldred of Erin

Southey's (Robert) Pilgrim's Progress

BELL, (HENRY G.) Sonnet to

272

The Cigar

57

Steamers versus Stages

177

The Favourite Actress

78

Stebbing's (Rev. H.) History of Chivalry and the Crusades 123

A Picture from Life

106

Stewart's (A.) Geography

127

The Dark Knight

135

Stokes's (Henry Sewell) Lay of the Desert

370

A Letter to my Cousin

168

Stories of Popular Voyages and Travels

10

To a Primrose

169

Surrenne's (Gab.) French Gramınatical Dictionary

340

A Song

209

Sibylline Leaves

59

Francesco

Song

Novello

Syme's (Dayid) Fortunes of

222

246

A Letter to my Cousin

235

To One I Love

262

Tales of Our Counties

275

The Wind's in the West.

302

Tam o' Shanter and Souter Johnny, a Poem

354

To Juliana

361

Taylor's (W.) History of France

143

To Juliana

375

(James) Letter to the Duke of Wellington

115

BROWN, (JAMES P.) Stanzas

376

Temple's (Edward) Travels in Peru,

186, 197 BRYDSON, (Thos.) The Earthquake

149

Theatre versus Conventicle

142

The Fallen Rock

390

Thomson (J.) on the Salvation of Infants

113

E. O. B., Song

195

Thomson's (Dr A.) Doctrine of Universal Pardon

153

Solitude-A Sonnet

209

(Mrs A.) Life of Sir Walter Raleigh

291

Thoughts on the Death of a Friend

247

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry

284

GERTRUDE, December 31st, 1829

14

Trebor's (E.) Hoyle made Familiar

246

The Last Song

40

True Plan of a Living Temple

282

Ada's Evening Hour

93

Tytler's (P. F.) History of Scotland, Vol. ill.

18

Aleene

121

To Vivian

118

Vane's (Lt.-Gen.) Narrative of the War in Germany and France 151

Sonnet

ib.

The Gentle Stream

222

Wade's (T.) Phrenologists

128

To Vivian

236

Walter Colyton

221

Song

263

Wanderer's Cave, the Young

129

Prayer

320

Warner's (Rev. R.) Literary Recollections

308

A Resolution

376

Webster's (James) Travels

13

GRAY, (Captain Chas.) Time

(Dr) Dictionary of the English Language

161

HALL, (S. C.) My Dying Friend

27

Wellesley's (Hon. W. Long) View of the Court of Chancery 32

HETHERINGTON, (W. M.) the Torwood Oak

248

Whitelaw's (James) Arithmetic

23

HISLOP, (JAS.) A Love Song

346

Wine-Drinker's Manual

340 Hocg, (Jas.) My Love she's but a Lassie yet

147

Withers's (W.) Letter to Sir Henry Steuart

Andrew the Packman

179

MISCELLANEOUS LITERATURE.

Verses

276

The Meeting of Anglers

290

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS, BY

A Grand New Blacking Sang

ib.

AIRD, (THOMAS)

215, 228, 259

Song

319

AUTHORESSES of the ODD VOLUNE

11, 330

990

JEWSBURY, (Miss) Last Night

BELL, (HENRY G.)

212, 219, 3ii, 342, 359 KENNEDY, (WM.) The New Philosophy

203

BISSING, (BARON)

91 KNOWLES, (JAMES SHERIDAN) The Song of Conciliation 195

CHAMBERS, (ROBT.)

36, 143, 315

- Lines

948

EDITOR of the INVERNESS COURIER

217

MALCOLM, (John) The Deathbed

EDITOR IN HIS SLIPPERS

65, 252

Lines on Music

40

HOGG, (JAMES)

50, 162 MACDONALD, (LAURENCE) To the Spirit of Beauty

55

MEMES, (Dr)

314

Stanzas to a Lady

ib,

MAXWELL, (P.)

164

Man's Life

PRIMROSE, (PERTINAX)

344

To a Lady

107

TENNANT, (WILLIAM)

129, 189, 214, 231, 288, 298

To two Sisters

149

Gem of my Soul

921

ANONYMOUS COMMUNICATIONS.

To Medora

243

Anderson's University, Glasgow

194

To Medora

(App.) 13

Artist, an

81, 201, 286

Lines on Life

362

Assembly, the General

MACKENZIE, (R. S.) Sonnet

107

Byron, Lord, and Mr Moore

220

13

MACLAGGAN, (ALEXANDER) Song

Diorama of Rouen

346

Summer Thoughts and Scenes 234

Elocution, Mr Roberts's

Song

319

Ettrick Shepherd's First Song

275 ORD, (J. W.) Mary's Eyes

249

Fee, My First

178

To a Dead Lark

277

Gardens and Gardeners, a Chapter on

357

An Autumnal Midnight Vision

204

Gambling, Remarks on

343

168

SILLERY, (CHARLES DOYNE) Oh! the Little World within

Gosford House and its Paintings

218

The Coming of Spring

292

Letter from Dublin

12

STODDART, (THOMAS TODD) Stanzas

134

Letter from Oban

300

TWERDIE, DAVID) Lines for the Eye of Mr James Hogg 221

Letter from Pisa

165

Wilson, (W.) The Faithless

317

Macdonald's new work-Thetis arming Achilles

93

To my Sister Ellen

118

Men and Things in London

276

Song

169

Metropolitan Theatricals

39, 106, 262, 301

Song

277

Milton and his Christmas Ode

10

Robert the Bruce

375

Moore's Life of Byron, Thoughts suggested by a perusal of 92

Philology, Remarks on

300

ANONYMOUS POETRY.

Portfolio of a Traveller, Sketches from the

117

To Alison

56

Psalms, Remarks on the Scottish Version of the

190

The Ascent of Elijah

313

Psalms of David

206

Lines

56

Royal Institute of France

316 The Young Lawyer's Soliloquy

79

Societies, Literary and Scientific, of Edinburgh, 24, 38, 54, 79, 93, The German Muse. From the German of Schiller

27

104, 121, 133, 146, 167, 180, 192, 231, 262, 317

On the Statues of the Muses

41

Spring-hours in Pere la Chaise

212

The Prodigal

3.7

Stephen Kemble and the Son of Neptune

216

56

Wallace, (Sir W.) and the Torwood Oak

Song

163

191

Sonnet

What's a' the Hurry

220

ib.

FINE ARTS.

My Mother

Academy, Scottish, Fourth Exhibition of

119, 131, 166 LITERARY CHIT-CHAT AND VARIETIES.

Academy, the Scottish

333 Pages 14, 27, 41, 57, 79. 91, 107, 122, 135, 119, 169, 182, 195, 209,

Engravings, New

Greenshields's (Mr) Jolly Beggars

236, 219, 263, 278, 302, 320, 334, 317, 376. App. 31, 13,

23

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TO OUR READERS.

in 1768. The captain and mate of the vessel in which Is commencing the Third Volume of the EDINBURGH LITERARY he took his passage, however, both died during the voyJor BSAL, we feel ourselves called upon to acknowledge the extra age of a fever, upon which he assumed the command, and ordinary success which has all along rewarded our labours. The brought the vessel safely into port. The owners aphopes which we entertained at the outset, arising partly from per pointed him, for this piece of service, master and superceiving the evident desideratum in this country of a purely literary cargo, in which situation he continued till the ship was weekly periodical, and partly from the very extensive literary con.

sold in the year 1771. His course of life for the next nexions which we enjoyed, have been much more than fulfilled. So deady and extensive is the patronage we have received, that we now

four years cannot be so accurately traced. At one time feel entitled to consider ourselves the weekly literary periodical of he was in command of a West India ship sailing from the Seoiland, the more especially as any opposition which may have been port of London. He seems also to have carried on comattempted has proved so entirely abortive.

mercial speculations on his own account in Grenada and For the future, we have to promise that we shall not only go on as Tobago. ' In 1773 we find him in Virginia, arranging we have begun, but that, vires acquirens eundo, we shall intro- the affairs of his brother, who had died intestate. In 1775 dure into our Third Volume many improvements and novelties, which will at once esince the increased nature of our resources, and he was living inactively in America. His habits of buafford a perpetually fresh fund of amusement, and, we hope, infor-siness must have been good, for though he began the world mation, to the reading public. We had at one time intended to spe with nothing, we find him possessed, at the time he emcify a few of these improvements : but, on second thoughts, we think barked in the American service, of nearly £1200 in Engit better to show, than to say, what we can do. We therefore refer land, besides considerable property in the island of Tobago. our readers to the contents of the LITERARY JOURNAL for the next

The fair profits of the West India trade at that period are six months, and if they do not find our Third Volume still more en. titled to their favour than either of its predecessors, we shall most

sufficient to account for this wealth, without the suspimagnanimously absolve them from all obligations to continue to cion of any more lax undertakings than intercourse with subscribe for the Fourth.

the Spanish main. His nautical skill must, in like manner, have been increased by his experience in commanding

a ship of considerable burden. Paul's, too, was a well LITERARY CRITICISM.

cultivated mind; besides his merely professional studies,

which subsequent events showed him to have pursued to Memoirs of Rear-Admiral Paul Jones, Chevalier of the good purpose, his letters evince a mastery of expression Military Order of Merit, and of the Russian Order of On the whole, his ardent and persevering disposition, ta

which could only be acquired by considerable practice. St Anne, Hc.gc. Now first compiled from his original ken in conjunction with the school of active life through journals and correspondence; including an account of his serrices under Prince Potemkin, prepared for publica- which he had passed, justify the confidence reposod in him tion by himself. Two vols. post '8vo. Pp. 331, 341. by the leaders of the American Revolution.

The second period of his history commences in his Edinburgh. Oliver and Boyd. 1830.

29th year.

He had his choice to be made first-lieuteThe history of Paul Jones is now, for the first time, nant of a frigate, or captain of a sloop of war, and preferpresented to the public in an authentic and satisfactory red the former. In this post he had for a while no other forma. The book is written in a candid and generous spi- opportunity of showing his zeal and energy, than what rit, and we are inclined to look upon it as a valuable ad- was afforded by the necessity of keeping a strict look-out dition to biography.

to prevent desertion while the fleet was frozen in during John Paul Jones was born in July 1747, near Arbig- the winter. The American arms were first tried at sea land, in the stewartry of Kirkcudbright. His father was in the affair of the Glasgow, oft Block Island. For their the son of a mail-gardener in Leith ; and was himself em behaviour on this occasion, two of the American captains ployed by Mr Craik of Arbigland, one of the earliest and were immediately after brought to a court-martial; but most judicious improvers of agriculture in the south of the inferior officers were declared to have done their duty. Scotland. Arbigland is situated at the embouchure of In 1777, Jones was appointed by Congress to the comthe With into the Solway, and a great proportion of the mand of a squadron of five vessels, destined for the attack surrounding inhabitants are engaged either in the fishery of Pensacola. This projected expedition came to nought, or the coasting trade. Young Paul showed early a de- through the jealousy of the commander-in-chief; and cided predilection for the sea, and was bound apprentice, shortly after, Jones was dispatched to France on board in his twelfth year, to a respectable Whitehaven mer the Ranger, with instructions to the American Commischant trading to Virginia, where he had a brother in sioners at Paris to procure him a good vessel, and emthriving circumstances, in whose house he resided as long ploy him in Europe, should any thing offer there likely ** the vessel remained in port. His master's affairs be- to prove conducive to the interests of the republic. After coming embarrassed, his indentures were given up to him, magnificent promises, with tardy and petty performance, and at a very early age he was appointed third mate of Jones was sent with the Ranger to cruise off the coasts the King George, a Whitehaven vessel employed in the of Britain. In this expedition he took several merchant slave trade. In his nineteenth year, he went as chief vessels, effected a landing at Whitehaven and St Mary's mate into the Two Friends, a Jamaica vessel engaged Isle, encountered and took the Drake ship of war, and in the same traffic. He quitted it, according to the returned to Brest, in May, 1778, after exciting the apprestatement of his relations, from disgust at its enormities, hensions of the whole British coast, and obtaining a num

ber of prisoners, which obliged England to agree to an ex- ring, but nothing more. The jealousies and heart-burnchange. A long interval of inaction followed, during | ings of the commander prevented any thing of importance which Jones was busy attempting to spur on the tardy from being effected. He was recalled to St Petersburg, French ministry to make some exertion. At last, on tho where the cabals of his enemies raised dark accusations 14th of August, 1779, he again set sail with a squadron against him, from which, however, he successfully vindiof five vessels. He first endeavoured to effect a landing cated himself. The Empress, who was by this time tired at Leith, in which he was frustrated by the weather. of him, granted him leave of absence-a polite method of On the 23d of September, he encountered and captured removing him from court. He visited Paris, where his the Serapis and Countess of Scarborough, his own vessel whole energies were directed to regaining his situation sinking immediately after the action. He afterwards under a government which had checked and thwarted him carried his squadron into the Texel, where he arrived on when in its service, and then coolly and ungratefully the 3d of October. The English fleet were lying off the thrown him aside. In the midst of his projects, death mouth of the Zuyder-Zee, and the Dutch, inclined to tem- overtook him on the 18th of July, 1792, shortly after he porize a little longer, would not recognise Jones; so he found had completed his forty-fifth year. considerable difficulty in making his way to a French port. The last nine years of his life contrast painfully with Being high in popular favour, he was received with em- the vigour and energy which characterise his earlier capressement at court, and had conferred on him by Louis reer. We know, from the report of one who knew Jones, the military order of merit, and a splendid sword. After and admired him, that his habits were finical in the exmuch unsatisfactory negotiation, he sailed for America, treme. His apartments were splendidly furnished ; and, where he arrived in February, 1781. He received the although he was accessible to all, yet his servants had pothanks of Congress; but his active career in the American sitive orders not to admit any pedestrian visitor, whose navy was now closed. He was promised the command boots or shoes were not free from all taint of mud or dust. of a large ship then building; but as the vessel was after- His correspondence at that period, too, shows that his wards presented to the King of France, his expectations female acquaintances were chiefly secondary imitators of were disappointed. He next solicited and obtained per- high life, and his letters to them are deeply marked with mission from Congress to go on board the French fleet a mawkish sentimentality and fade gallantry. His taste cruising on the American seas, for improvement in his was not sufficient to guide him aright, and, instead of a profession. The peace, which almost immediately follow- gallant gentleman, he became a mandlin fop. ed, put an end to his studies in this school.

The fate of John Paul Jones reads a lesson to all fuThe portion of Paul Jones's history of which we have ture time. Naturally endowed with an aspiring mind, now given a short abstract, was the most brilliant of his generous sentiments, great talents, without any overlife. His cool, though reckless courage, his skill in ma-whelming passions, he sacrificed the ties of kindred, and noeuvring a vessel, the number and ingenuity of his pro- the prospect of humble usefulness, to love of distinction. jects, the perseverance with which he continued to urge Introduced into the splendid circle of a court, he saw on the cold and the fickle, but, more than all, the true and there yet richer food for his vanity, and to it he sacrificed comprehensive view he took of the state of the Ameri- his political principles. The two best guides of human can marine, his incessant warnings of the dangers im nature thus rudely eradicated, his heart withered and his pending from its want of discipline, and its disorganized arm grew weak. His close of life was a fruitless struggle state, and the modesty with which he always acknow to attain what, if possessed, could have afforded him no ledged his deficiency in the tactics of combined fleets, enjoyment. His epitaph may well be—“ One of God's and anxiety to remedy it, prove that he had within him creatures lies here, wrecked by his inordinate self-will." all the materials of a great commander. In regard to his embracing the cause of America, he had lived as much in that country as in Britain, and the combatants on

Life of Hernan Cortes. By Don Telesforo de Trueba y either side being thoroughbred Englishmen, it would be Cosio, Author of “ Gomez Arias,” “ The Castilian," childish at this time of day to maintain that there was &c. Being Constable's Miscellany, Vol. XLIX. any thing unnatural in his adhering to the Transatlantic

Edinburgh. Pp. 344. party. His conduct to his family was throughout most praiseworthy; and towards such English as the chance The author of this interesting and romantic biography of war threw in his power, it was totally free from any justly demands that his hero's character be judged by the taint of the mean and malignant renegade. At the same standard of the age in which he lived. The enlightened totime, it cannot be denied that his motives may well have lerance which characterises every truly great man of the been of a mixed and doubtful kind.

nineteenth century, was unattainable by a native of Spain On the 1st of November, 1783, Jones was appointed by at the period when that nation, in the flush of its newly Congress, at his own earnest solicitation, “agent for all concentrated energies, fondly deemed the discovery of Ameprizes taken in Europe under his own command.” In rica, happening, as it did, at the very moment of the final discharging the duties of this office, he spent three years expulsion of the Moors from Spain, a proof of its Divine in Paris, during which time he figured in the gay world mission to root out infidelity from the earth. It is suffithere, greatly to the satisfaction of his personal feelings. cient if, taking his whole life into review, we find that In the year 1787, he paid a short visit to America. Ön Cortes's employment of the high talents with which he his return to Europe, he proceeded to Copenhagen, osten-was endowed by nature, did not materially swerve from sibly on a mission regarding some of his prizes which had those principles of justice which had been discovered and been carried into Danish ports, but in reality to be near established in his time. A recapitulation of the most St Petersburg, where negotiations had already been set striking events in his conquest of Mexico will afford the on foot for his entrance into the service of the Empress best solution of this problem. Catherine. At the first beck of that jolly despot, he Mexico, or New Spain, rises abruptly from the coasts hastened to her court, where he was flatteringly received, both of the Pacificand Atlanticoceans; and the lofty plateau and invested with the rank of Rear-Admiral. His trans subsides into a capacious basin, nearly in the centre of formation into the courtier, which had been partially ef- which is the lake of Mexico, the climate of which apfected at Paris, was now completed. Ile was inflamed proximates to that of the more favoured countries of with a chivalrous devotion to his liege lady, and spoke in the temperate zones. The inhabitants, and in particular a most patronising tone of the infant state of America. those who occupied the islands and margin of the central He was soon summoned by Potemkin to take a share in fresh-water sea, had advanced in civilisation, when Mexico the campaign of the Liman. The operations of this war was first discovered, far before the surrounding tribes. afforded Joues an opportunity of showing his native da- The mechanical, and even the ornamental arts, had made

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