A General View of the Progress of Ethical Philosophy: Chiefly During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

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Carey, Lea, and Blanchard, 1834 - 304 頁
 

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第 203 頁 - Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil, Nor in the glistering foil Set off to the world, nor in broad rumour lies, But lives and spreads aloft by those pure eyes And perfect witness of all-judging Jove; As he pronounces lastly on each deed, Of so much fame in heaven expect thy meed.
第 184 頁 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
第 60 頁 - The laws of nature are immutable and eternal; for injustice, ingratitude, arrogance, pride, iniquity, acception of persons, and the rest can never be made lawful. For it can never be that war shall preserve life, and peace destroy it.
第 136 頁 - s heart was smitten ; and I have heard him, long after, confess that there were moments when the remembrance overcame him even to weakness ; when, amidst all the pleasures of philosophical discovery, and the pride of literary fame, he recalled to his mind the venerable figure of the good La Roche, and wished that he had never doubted.
第 133 頁 - Truth is the cry of all, but the game of a few. Certainly, where it is the chief passion, it doth not give way to vulgar cares and views ; nor is it contented with a little ardour in the early time of life ; active, perhaps, to pursue, but not so fit to weigh and revise. He that would make a real progress in knowledge must dedicate his age as well as youth, the later growth as well as first fruits, at the altar of Truth.
第 7 頁 - They consist only of facts arranged according to their likeness, and expressed by general names given to every class of similar facts. The purpose of the moral sciences is to answer the question What ought to be...
第 118 頁 - Let us not then be puffed up for one against another, above that which is written: let us love the Lord our God with all our heart, with all our soul, and with all our mind: and our neighbour as ourself.
第 250 頁 - D'Alembert," says a very late writer, " congratulate a young man very coldly, who brought him a solution of a problem. The young man said, ' I have done this in order to have a seat in the Academy.' ' Sir,' answered D'Alembert, ' with such dispositions you never will earn one Science must be loved for its own sake, and not for the advantage to be derived. No other principle will enable a man to make progress in the sciences.
第 115 頁 - Nature, though only a commentary on the singularly original and pregnant passage of Origen, which is so honestly prefixed to it as a motto, is, notwithstanding, the most original and profound work extant in any language on the Philosophy of Religion.
第 129 頁 - Ancient learning, exact science, polished society, modern literature, and the fine arts, contributed to adorn and enrich the mind of this accomplished man. All his contemporaries agreed with the satirist in ascribing '' To Berkeley every virtue under heaven.

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