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1940 (President)-Thomas, Soc., 4,586; Aiken, Soc. Lab., 667; Browder, Com., 2,626; Babson, Proh., 1,686.

1940 (U. S. Senator)-Wallgren, Dem., 404,718; Chadwick, Rep., 342,589.

1940 (Governor)-Langlie, Rep., 392,522; Dill, Dem., 386,706; Brockway, Com., 1,674; Ater, Soc. Lab., 426. 1938 (U. S. Senator)-Bone, Dem., 371,535; Colvin, Rep., 220,204; Solie, Soc. Lab., 1,553. 1936 (President)-Lemke, Union, 17,463; Thomas, Soc., 3,496; Browder, Com., 1,907; Colvin, Proh., 1,041; Aiken, Soc. Lab., 362; Pellsy, Christian, 1,598.

PAST VOTE OF WASHINGTON

1892 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 29,844: Harrison, Rep., 36,460; Weaver, People's, 19,105; Bidwell, Proh., 2,553.

1896 (Pres.), McKinley, Rep., 39,153; Bryan, Dem. and People's, 51,646; Palmer, Nat. Dem., 1,668; Levering, Proh., 1,116.

1900 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 44,833; McKinley, Rep., 57,456; Woolley, Proh., 2,363; Debs, Soc., 2,006. 1904 (Pres.), Parker, Dem., 28,098; Roosevelt, Rep., 101,540; Swallow, Proh., 3,329; Debs, Soc., 10.023. 1908 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 58,691; Taft, Rep., 106,062; Chafin, Proh., 4,700; Debs, Soc., 14,177. 1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 86,840; Taft, Rep., 70,445; Roosevelt, Prog., 113,698; Debs, Soc., 40,134.

1916 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 183,388; Hughes, Rep.,

167,244; Hanly, Proh., 6,868; Benson, Soc., 22,800. 1920 (Pres.), Cox, Dem., 84,298: Harding, Rep., 223,137; Watkins, Proh., 3,790; Debs, Soc., 8,913; Christensen, Farm-Lab., 77,246.

1924 (Pres.), Coolidge, Rep., 220,224: LaFollette.
Progs., 150,727; Davis, Dem., 42,842; Nations.
Amer., 5,991; Johns, Soc-Lab., 1,004; Foster,
Workers, 761.

1928 (Pres.), Hoover, Rep., 335,884; Smith, Dem.,
156,772; Thomas. Soc., 2,614; Reynolds, Soc.
Lab., 4,068; Foster, Com., 1,541.

1932 (Pres.), Roosevelt, Dem., 353,260; Hoover, Rep., 208,645; Harvey, Lib., 30,308; Thomas, Soc., 17,080; Foster, Com., 2,972; Upshaw, Proh., 1,540; Reynolds, Soc. Lab., 1,009.

In 1852 Washington was organized as a separate territory and in 1872 the last dispute over its northern boundary line, known as the "fifty-four-forty or fight" controversy, which started back in 1859 (precipitated by the death of a British pig in the potato patch of an American settler on the island of San Juan), was amicably decided in favor of Uncle Sam through the arbitration of the German emperor. During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries the region was explored by Capt. Robert Gray, Capt. George Vancouver, Lewis and Clark, and others. Its settlement by the whites dates from 1811, when David Thompson established for the North West Fur Company a post on the Spokane River near the present city of Spokane, and members of Astor's fur company built a post on the Okanogan River; seven years later Fort Walla Walla was erected on the present site of Wallula.

On November 11, 1889, Washington, the northwest corner of the Union, named after its first president, was admitted to statehood and Elisha P. Ferry was elected the first governor.

The voters of Seattle (March 8, 1938) elected Arthur B. Langlie Mayor over Lieut. Gov. Victor A. Myers. Langlie ran as the "good-government" candidate and Mr. Myers was backed by the Committee for Industrial Organization. All the left wing nominees went down to crushing defeat in the election and proposals for the expenditure of additional public funds were rejected overwhelmingly. Seattle newspapers hailed the election as a triumph for the better element in the city and said that the result meant an end of the factional strife for control of the city government and would re-establish government for all the people of the city.

Gingko Petrified Forest in Washington

Gardens of the bygone, set with colossal trees. | Lakes district of this country, plus many Asiatic lost their tropic verdure in the onrush of lava, and semi-tropical varieties. leaving only the skeletons of those giant trees, imbedded in crumbling lava rock and soil in the hills near the Columbia River.

Some ten to thirty million years ago those mammoth trees were swept along in a Columbia Basin lava flow, stifling them in its molten mass. Ten additional flows of lava, laid upon the skeleton of that ancient forest, have since been eroded away by wind, rain, and river action. Now close to the surface are marvelous opal logs, showing the exact structure of the wood, rings and grain, cast in a medium more beautiful than agate.

The climate in which this far-distant garden flourished must have been similar to the present Inland Empire's temperature, but damp, because the Cascades had not yet been thrown up to catch the Pacific rain-clouds with their spurs. As a result the trees were of a type found now in the Great

The Gingko for which the forest is named, is an Oriental tree, a silver apricot, growing until the last century only in the sacred gardens of China. It is now used in Japan and in this country for ornamental purposes. The only known specimens of petrified Gingko are found in this forest, 28 miles east of Ellensburg on the main highway near the Vantage bridge over the Columbia River.

About 100 logs have been uncovered here. Besides the Gingko, there are three- and four-foot Douglas firs. Maple has been found three feet through, and among the spruce and three kinds of elm are logs nearly two feet in diameter. Others unearthed include bay, locust, oak, sweet gum, birch, and blue beach. Foot mass, solidified into hard red stone, is found near the Douglas fir in some cases. Half a dozen specimens of hardwoods have not been identified with any present-day species or with any known extinct species.

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1940 (U. S. Senator)-Kilgore, Dem., 492,413; Sweeney, Rep., 381,806. 1940 (Governor)-Neely, Dem., 496,028; Dawson, Rep., 383,698. 1936 (President)-Thomas, Soc., 832; Colvin., Proh., 1,173. 1936 (U. S. Senator)-Neely, Dem., 488,720; Schott, Rep., 338,363; MacDonald, Proh., 1,005; Snider, Soc., 935.

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PAST VOTE OF WEST VIRGINIA

1872 (Pres.), Greeley, Dem. and Lib., 29,533; Grant, Rep., 32,323.

1876 (Pres.), Tilden, Dem., 55,584; Hayes, Rep., 41,392.

1880 (Pres.), Hancock, Dem., 57,391; Garfield, Rep., 46,243; Weaver, Greenback, 9,079. 1884 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 67,331; Blaine, Rep., 63.913; St. John, Proh., 939; Butler. Greenback, 810.

1888 (Pres.), Cleveland. Dem.. 78,677; Harrison, Rep., 78,171; Fisk, Proh., 1,085; Streeter, United Labor, 1,508.

1892 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 84,467; Harrison, Rep., 80,293; Weaver, People's, 4,166; Bidwell, Proh., 2,145.

1896 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem. and People's (Populist), 94,488; Palmer, Nat'l (Gold) Dem., 678; McKinley, Rep., 105,379; Levering, Proh., 1,223. 1900 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 98.807: McKinley, Rep., 119,829; Wooley, Proh., 1,692; Debs. Soc.. 219. 1904 (Pres.), Parker, Dem., 100,881; Roosevelt,

In 1669-70 Governor Norborne Berkeley, of Virginia, who was heavily interested in the fur trade, sent John Lederer on three expeditions westward of the mountains. He claimed to have seen the mountains that now form the boundary between Virginia and West Virginia. Major-General Wood. in 1670, was commissioned "for the finding out the ebbing and flowing of the waters on the other side of the mountains." In this quest Captain Thomas Batts and four men discovered the New River and penetrated as far as the falls of the Great Kanawha by September 16, 1671. Gabriel Arthur subsequently penetrated to the Indian village of Moneton along the lower Great Kanawha valley.

In 1716, Governor Spottswood led a party of thirty cavaliers, who may have penetrated to the region of Pendleton County. Out of this expedition grew the "Knights of the Golden Horseshoe." By 1725, John Van Meter, from New York, is found exploring the valley of the South Branch of the Potomac. His accounts carried to the east led to an influx of settlers who mingled with others from Pennsylvania. In 1726, Morgan Morgan erected his home on the site of Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, and became the first recorded settler in present West Virginia. The next year a settlement sprang up at the Packhorse Ford, now Shepherdstown. By 1730 there were settlers in the lower Potomac Valley. In 1732 Joist Hite came with

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Rep., 132,628; Soc., 1,574. 1908 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 111,418: Taft, Rep. 137,869; Chafin, Proh., 5,139; Debs. Soc., 3,679. 1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 113,046; Taft, Rep.. 56,667; Roosevelt, Prog., 78,977; Debs, Soc.. 15,336.

Swallow, Proh., 4,604; Debs,

1916 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 140,403; Hughes, Rep.. 143,124; Hanly, Proh., 175; Benson, Soc., 6,150. 1920 (Pres.), Cox, Dem., 220,789; Harding, Rep.. 282,007; Watkins, Proh., 1,528; Debs, Soc., 5,618. 1924 (Pres.), Coolidge, Rep., 288,635; Davis, Dem.. 257,232; LaFollette, Progs., 36,723; Nations. Amer., 1,072.

1928 (Pres.), Hoover, Rep., 375,551; Smith, Dem.. 263,748; Thomas, Soc., 1,313; Varney, Proh.. 1703: Foster, Com., 401.

1932 (Pres.), Roosevelt, Dem., 405,124; Hoover, Rep.. 330,731; Thomas, Soc., 5,133; Upshaw. Proh., 2,342; Foster, Com., 444.

several contemporaries and by 1735 settlers were along the South Fork of the Potomac. All of this region was a part of the land embraced in the "Northern Neck" grant to Lord Fairfax, whose surveyors in 1746 planted the celebrated Fairfax stone at the head of the North Branch of the Potomac to mark the western limits.

In 1768, following the retreat of the French from the Ohio regions, the Six Nations sold the land to the English. Other Indian tribes claimed the country, but within historic times no Indians occupied West Virginia. Numerous evidences of previous occupancy of the Indians and of the Mound Builders, an earlier race, are to be found all over the State, but more especially along the Ohio River. The encroachment of the whites, and the settlement of this region, led to conflicts that lasted many years. Dunmore's War, in 1774, was marked by the battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, between troops under General Andrew Lewis, and Indians under Chief Cornstalk. This was really the

forerunner of the Revolution.

With the opening of the American Revolution. troops from along the Potomac were among the first to reach Washington at Boston. A considerable number of citizens from western Virginia were in all major engagements from Boston to Yorktown. Others followed George Rogers Clark in his conquest of the west from the British and Indian allies.

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1940 (President)-Thomas, Soc., 15,071; Babson, Proh., 2,148; Browder, Com., 2,394; Aiken, Soc. Lab., 1,882.

1940 (U. S. Senator)-LaFolette, Prog., 605,609; Clausen, Rep., 553,692; Finnegen, Dem., 176,688: Furman, Com., 1,308; Wiggert, Jr., Soc. Lab., 838.

1940 (Governor)-Heil, Rep., 558,678; Loomis, Prog., 546,436; McGovern, Dem., 264,985; Blair, Com., 2,340; Fisher, Soc. Lab., 1,158.

1938 (Governor)-Heil, Rep., 543,675; La Follette, Prog., 353,381; Bolens, Dem., 78,446; Smith, Union, 4,564; Schleier, Soc., Lab., 1,459.

1938 (U. S. Senator)-Wiley, Rep., 446,770: Ekern, Progr., 249,209; Duffy, Dem., 231,976; Chapple, Townsend Plan, 7,251; Blair, Ind., Com., 1,283; Ehrhardt, Soc., Lab., 1,014.

1936 (President)-Lemke, Union, 60,297; Thomas, Soc., 10,626; Browder, Com., 2,197; Colvin, Proh., 1,071; Aiken, Soc. Lab., 557.

1936 (Governor)-La Follette, Progr., 573,724; Wiley, Rep., 363,973; Lueck, Dem., 268,530; Walsh, Union, 27,934; Ehrhardt, Soc. Lab., 1,738; Fehlandt, Proh., 1,008. PAST VOTE OF WISCONSIN 1872 (Pres.), Greeley, Dem. and Lib., 86,477; Soc., 7,051. Grant. Rep., 104.992.

1876 (Pres.), Tilden, Dem., 123,927; Hayes, Rep., 130,068; Cooper, Greenback, 1,509; Smith, Proh. Ref., 153.

1880 (Pres.), Hancock, Dem., 114,634: Garfield. Rep., 144,897; Weaver, Greenback, 7,980; Dow. Proh., 69.

1884 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 146,453; Blaine. Rep., 161,135; St. John, Proh., 7,649; Butler. Greenback, 4,598.

1888 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 155,243; Harrison, Rep., 176,555; Fisk, Proh., 14,415; Streeter,

U. Lab., 8,561.

1890 (Gov.), Dem., 160,388; Rep., 132,068; U. Lab., 5,447; Proh., 11,246.

1892 (Pres.), Cleveland, Dem., 177,335; Harrison, Rep., 170,846; Weaver, People's, 9,909; Bidwell, Proh., 13,132.

1894 (Gov.), Dem., 142,250; Rep., 196,150; Pop., 25,604; Proh.. 11,240.

1896 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem. and People's (Populist). 165,349; Palmer, Nat'l (Gold) Dem.. 4,553; McKinley, Rep., 268,051; Levering. Proh., 7,799. 1900 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 159,279; McKinley, Rep., 265,756; Woolley, Proh., 10,022; Debs,

1904 (Pres.), Parker, Dem., 124, 107; Roosevelt, Rep., 280,164; Swallow, Proh.. 9,770; Debs, Soc.. 28,220.

1908 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 166,632; Taft, Rep.. 247,747; Chafin, Proh., 11,572; Debs, Soc., 28,170. 1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 164,228; Taft, Rep., 130,695; Roosevelt, Prog., 62,460; Debs, Soc., 33.481.

1916 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 193,042; Hughes,
Rep., 221,323; Hanly, Proh., 7,166; Benson, Soc..
27,846.

1920 (Pres.), Cox, Dem., 113,422; Harding, Rep.,
498,576; Watkins, Proh.. 8,647; Debs, Soc., 85,041.
1924 (Pres.), La Follette, Progs., 453,678; Coolidge,
Rep., 311,614; Davis, Dem., 68,115; Foster.
Workers, 3,773; Faris, Proh., 2,918; Johns, Soc.
Lab., 411; Wallace, Comm. Land, 270.
1928 (Pres.), Hoover, Rep., 544,205; Smith, Dem.,
450,259; Thomas, Soc., 18,213; Foster, Com..
1,528; Reynolds. Soc. Lab., 381; Varney, Proh..
2.245.

1932 (Pres.), Roosevelt, Dem., 707,410; Hoover,
Rep., 347,741; Thomas, Soc., 53,379; Foster,
Com., 3,112; Upshaw, Proh., 2,672; Reynolds,
Soc. Lab., 494.

French traders and missionaries first settled Wisconsin in 1670 and it was part of the country known as New France from 1634 until it was surrendered to the British in 1763 and to the United States in 1783 as a part of the Northwest territory. Wisconsin was admitted to the Union May 29, 1848. The Legislature consists of a Senate of 33 members elected for four years, one half (16 or 17 alternately) being elected each two years, and an Assembly of 100 members all elected for two years. The state has 71 counties.

At the beginning of Wisconsin's recorded history, the Indians of this area possessed a culture which had advanced to a degree midway between that of the superior culture of the Aztecs of Mexico and that of more backward tribes such as the Utes. They lived in villages which, in numerous instances, were situated where many a thriving city and town stands today. In the early summer season the men were content to stay close to the villages while the women tilled the soil and planted corn but before summer waned they would leave to hunt buffalo. Meanwhile, the women would go fishing, gather material for mats, or work in mines from which they obtained ore for making implements or ornaments.

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1940 (President)-Babson, Proh., 172; Thomas, Soc., 148.

1940 (U. S. Senator)-O'Mahoney, Dem., 65,022; Simpson, Rep., 45,682.

1936 (President)-Thomas, Soc., 200; Lemke, Union, 1,653; Browder, Com., 91; Colvin. Proh., 75. PAST VOTE OF WYOMING

1892 (Pres.), Harrison, Rep., 8,454; Weaver,
People's, 7,722: Bidwell, Proh.. 530.
1896 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem. and People's (Populist),
10,375; McKinley, Rep., 10,072; Proh., 159.
1900 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 10,164; McKinley,
Rep., 14,482.

1904 (Pres.), Parker, Dem., 8,930; Roosevelt, Rep.,
20,489; Swallow, Proh.. 217; Debs. Soc., 1,077.
1908 (Pres.), Bryan, Dem., 14,918; Taft, Rep..
20,846; Chafin, Proh., 66; Debs, Soc., 1,715.
1912 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem.. 15,310: Taft, Rep.
14,560; Roosevelt, Prog., 9,232; Debs, Soc., 2,760.

1916 (Pres.), Wilson, Dem., 28,316; Hughes, Rep.. 21,698; Hanly, Proh., 373; Benson, Soc., 1,453. 1920 (Pres.), Cox, Dem., 17,429; Harding, Rep.. 35.091; Watkins, Proh.. 265; Debs, Soc., 1,288: Christensen, F.-Lab., 2,180.

1924 (Pres.), Coolidge, Rep., 41,858: LaFollette. Progs., 25,174: Davis. Dem.. 12,868.

1928 (Pres.), Hoover. Rep., 52,748; Smith, Dem.. 29,299: Thomas, Soc., 788.

1932 (Pres.), Roosevelt, Dem., 54,370; Hoover, Rep., 39,583; Thomas, Soc., 2,829; Foster, Com.. 180.

Electoral Votes for President, 1904-1940

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159

347

246

3571

413

515

Plur'lity 196
23 277
The electoral vote for Vice-President in 1896 was: Republican, 271; Democratic, 149; Populist. 27.
The 4 electoral votes of Utah and the 4 electoral votes of Vermont in 1912 were cast for the
Republican candidates W. H. Taft for President and Nicholas Murray Butler for Vice-President.
The 13 votes of Wisconsin in 1924 were cast for the Progressive candidate, Robert M. La Follette.

Popular Vote for President, 1940, by States

Source: Secretary of United States Senate

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Thomas (Soc.) 99,557; Browder (Com.) 46,251; Babson (Proh.) 57,812; Aiken (Soc. Lab.) 14,861; other 48,610; total 49,815,312.

Popular Vote for President in 1936 by States

(Compiled from official sources by direction of South Trimble, Clerk, House of Representatives)

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Browder, Communist, 80,159. The "other" total of 340,203, includes Colvin, Proh., 37,847; Aiken, Soc.-Lab., 12,777; and scattering and void votes. Total popular vote-45,646,817.

Popular Vote for President in 1932 by States

(Compiled from official sources by direction of South Trimble, Clerk of the House of Representatives) Roos. Hoover Thos. Roos. Hoover Thos. Roos. Hoover Thos. States Dem. Rep. Soc. States Dem. Rep. Soc. States Dem. Rep. Soc. Ala.. 207,910 34,675 2,030 Me.. 128,907 Ariz.. 79,264 36,104 2,618 Md.. 314,314 Ark... 189,602 28,467 1,269 Mass. 800,148 Calif. 1,324,157 847,902 63,299 Mich.) 871,700 189,617 13,591 Minn. 600,806 288,420 20,480 Miss.. 140,168 57,073 1,376 Mo... 1,025,406 69,170 775 Mont. 127,286 Ga.. 234,118 19,863 461 Nebr.. Idaho. 109,479 71.312 526 Nev..

Colo.. 250,877
Conn. 281,632

Del... 54,319
Fla... 206,307

1,882,304 1,432.756 67,258 N. H.. Ind.. 862,054 677.184 21,388 N. J.. Iowa.. 598,019 414,433 20,467 N. M. Kan. 424,204 349,498 18,276 N. Y.. 580,574 394,716) 3,853 N. C.. 249,418/ 18,853

Ky.

La..

359,082

28,756 100,680

1,978

166,631 2,489 Ohlo.. 1,301,695 1,227,679 64,094
184,184 10,489 Okla.. 516,468 188,165
736,959 34,305 Ore... 213,871 136,019 15,450
739,894 39,205 Pa... 1,295,948 1,453,540 91,119
363,959 25,476 R. I.. 146,604 115,266 3,138
5,180 686 S. Car.
564,713 16,374 S. D.
78,078 7,891 Tenn.
201,177 9,876 Texas.
12,674
Utah..
103,629 947 Vt...

102,347

82

183,515

99,212 1,551

259,817

126,806 1,786

760,348

97,959 4,450 116,750 84,795 4,087 56,266 78,984 1,533

806,630 775,684 42,998 Va.. 203,979 89,637 2,382

95,089 54,217 1,776 Wash. 2,534,959 1,937,963 177,397 W.Va. 497,566 208,344 5,591 Wis...

353,260 208,645 17,080 405,124 330,731 5,133 707,410 347,741 53,379

UN. D.. 178,350 71,772 3,521 Wyo.. 54,370 39,583 2,829

Total-Roosevelt 22,821,857; Hover 15,761,841; Thomas 884,781.

Reynolds, Socialist-Labor, 33,275; Foster, Communist, 102,991; Upshaw, Prohibition, 81,869; Harvey. Liberty, 53,425; Coxey, Farm-Labor, 7,309; total vote-39,816,522.

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