What Computers Still Can't Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason

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MIT Press, 1992 - 354 頁
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When it was first published in 1972, Hubert Dreyfus's manifesto on the inherentinability of disembodied machines to mimic higher mental functions caused an uproar in theartificial intelligence community. The world has changed since then. Today it is clear that "goodold-fashioned AI," based on the idea of using symbolic representations to produce generalintelligence, is in decline (although several believers still pursue its pot of gold), and the focusof the Al community has shifted to more complex models of the mind. It has also become more commonfor AI researchers to seek out and study philosophy. For this edition of his now classic book,Dreyfus has added a lengthy new introduction outlining these changes and assessing the paradigms ofconnectionism and neural networks that have transformed the field.At a time when researchers wereproposing grand plans for general problem solvers and automatic translation machines, Dreyfuspredicted that they would fail because their conception of mental functioning was naive, and hesuggested that they would do well to acquaint themselves with modern philosophical approaches tohuman beings. What Computers Can't Do was widely attacked but quietly studied. Dreyfus's argumentsare still provocative and focus our attention once again on what it is that makes human beingsunique.Hubert L. Dreyfus, who is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley,is also the author of Being-in-the-World. A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, DivisionI.

 

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內容

Introduction to the MIT Press Edition
ix
Acknowledgments
liii
Introduction
67
Ten Years of Research in Artificial
89
Simulation
91
Phase II 19621967 Semantic Information Processing
130
Conclusion
149
Introduction
155
The Ontological Assumption
206
Conclusion
225
Introduction
231
Orderly Behavior Without Recourse
256
The Situation as a Function of Human Needs
272
Conclusion
281
Notes
307
Index
346

The Psychological Assumption
163
The Epistemological Assumption
189

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關於作者 (1992)

Hubert Lederer Dreyfus was born in Terre Haute, Indiana on October 15, 1929. He received a bachelor's degree in philosophy in 1951, a master's degree in 1952, and a doctorate in 1964 from Harvard University. He taught at Brandeis University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before joining the philosophy department at the University of California, Berkeley in 1968. He wrote or co-wrote numerous books during his lifetime including Alchemy and Artificial Intelligence, What Computers Can't Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason, Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics written with Paul Rabinow, Mind Over Machine: The Power of Human Intuition and Expertise in the Era of the Computer, What Computers Still Can't Do, Philosophy: The Latest Answers to the Oldest Questions, All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age written with Sean D. Kelly, and Skillful Coping: Essays on the Everyday Phenomenology of Everyday Perception and Action. He and Mark Wrathall edited numerous guides devoted to existentialism, phenomenology, and Heidegger's philosophy. He died of cancer on April 22, 2017 at the age of 87.

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