Miscellaneous Notices Relating to China: And Our Commercial Intercourse with that Country, Including a Few Translations from the Chinese Language, 第 2 篇

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J. Murray, 1828 - 482 頁
 

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第 54 頁 - La loi, en général, est la raison humaine, en tant qu'elle gouverne tous les peuples de la terre; et les lois politiques et civiles de chaque nation ne doivent être que les cas particuliers où s'applique cette raison humaine. Elles doivent être tellement propres au peuple pour lequel elles sont faites, que c'est un très grand hasard si celles d'une nation peuvent convenir à une autre.
第 44 頁 - A government, constituted upon the basis of parental authority, thus highly estimated and extensively applied, has certainly the advantage of being directly sanctioned by the immutable and ever-operating laws of Nature, and must thereby acquire a degree of firmness and durability, to which governments, founded on the fortuitous superiority of particular individuals, either in strength or abilities, and continued only through the hereditary influence of particular families, can never be expected to...
第 59 頁 - Laws is generally spoken of by the natives with pride and admiration ; all they seem in general to desire is, its just and impartial execution, independent of caprice, and uninfluenced by corruption.
第 271 頁 - When we turn from the ravings of the Zendavesta, or the Puranas, to the tone of sense and of business of this Chinese collection, we seem to be passing from darkness to light — from the drivellings of dotage to the exercise of an improved understanding : and, redundant and minute as these laws are in many particulars, we scarcely know any European code that is at once so copious and so consistent, or that is nearly so free from intricacy, bigotry, and fiction.
第 3 頁 - ... pursuits Since the memorable era of Confucius, the Chinese empire has been repeatedly dismembered, and again restored to its integrity ; its sceptre has passed through the hands of many families...
第 271 頁 - Puranas, to the tone of sense and of business of this Chinese collection, we seem to be passing from darkness to light — from the drivellings of dotage to the exercise of an improved understanding : and redundant and minute as these laws are in many particulars, we scarcely know any European code that is at once so copious and so consistent, or that is nearly so free from intricacy, bigotry, and fiction. In everything relating to political freedom, or individual independence, it is, indeed, wofully...
第 98 頁 - It ia manifest from this article, that parents are not in any case absolutely intrusted with a power over the lives of their children, and that accordingly the crime of infanticide, however prevalent it may be supposed to be in China is not in fact either directly sanctioned by the government, or agreeable to the general spirit of the laws and institutions of the empire.
第 59 頁 - ... to desire is, its just and impartial execution, independent of caprice, and uninfluenced by corruption. That the laws of China are, on the contrary, very frequently violated by those who are their administrators and constitutional guardians, there can unfortunately be no question ; but to what extent, comparatively with the laws of other countries, must at present be very much a matter of conjecture ; at the same time it may be observed, as something in favor of the Chinese system, that there...
第 274 頁 - He pronounces China superior to the other countries of Asia, both in the arts of government, and the general aspect of society : and adds, that the laws are more generally known, and more equally administered; that those examples of oppression, accompanied with infliction of barbarous punishment, which offend the eye and distress the feelings of the most hurried traveller in other Asiatic countries, are scarcely to be met with in China; that the proportion which the middling...
第 98 頁 - ... great stress upon the existence of such a practice, as a proof of the cruelty or insensibility of the Chinese character. — Even the dreadful crime of a parent destroying its offspring, is extenuated by the wretched and desperate situation to which the labouring poor in China, to whom the practice of infanticide is admitted to be in general confined, must, by the universal and almost compulsory custom of early marriages, often be reduced ; having large and increasing families, while, owing to...

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