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pilot, clerk in a store and mill. He was faithful in little things, and in that way made himself able to deal with great ones. Once a woman, in paying for some articles, gave Lincoln sixpence too much. After she was gone, he discovered that she had overpaid him, and that night, after the store was closed, he walked to the woman's home, several miles off, and returned the sixpence. It was such actions as these that caused him to be called “Honest Abe.”

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Pupil 6.- Lincoln as Soldier. In 1832 was the Black Hawk War. Because of his popularity, Lincoln was chosen captain of a company. He afterward declared that the only battles he fought in this war were with mosquitoes. At the close of the war he returned to his Illinois store and began the study of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1837, and removed to Springfield, Ill. He was afterward elected to the State legislature and to Congress.

Pupil 7.-Lincoln's Marriage. In 1839. Lincoln became acquainted with Mary Todd of Lexington, Ky. She was attractive, noted for her wit, and had many admirers. She said she had always had an ambition to marry some one who would become president. She had a quick temper, which ofttimes caused trouble. She contributed some articles to a local newspaper, ridiculing a politician. This caused anger, and Lincoln, to shield her, assumed the authorship of them, barely avoiding a duel by so doing. About six weeks after this event he married Miss Todd.

PUPIL 8.- Lincoln as President. On February 11, 1861, Lincoln took leave of his friends and neighbors at Springfield, Illinois, in a speech of pathetic beauty, and journeyed to Washington to take the oath of office as President of the United States. In less than six weeks after Lincoln became President, the Civil War began. This war lasted four years. Many dreadful battles were fought, thousands of brave men fell on both sides. During this war Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared the slaves to be free. At last the soldiers laid down their arms and peace was made.

PUPIL 9.-Death of Lincoln. On the evening of April 14, 1865, President Lincoln had gone, by invitation, to witness "Our American Cousin," at Ford's Theater, Washington. During the progress of the play John Wilkes Booth, an actor, suddenly entered the President's box, placed a pistol at back of Lincoln's head and fired, jumping from the box on to the stage and escaping from the building. The President sank into unconsciousness, lingered until next morning, when, surrounded by a small group of friends and members of the Cabinet, he passed beyond. A pall of sorrow spread over the land. Lincoln's body was borne through multitudes of mourners and laid in the tomb at Springfield. Over the door of the State House were these lines: "He left us borne up by our prayers; he returns embalmed in our tears.”

FLAGS CELEBRATE LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY.

FOR ANY NUMBER OF CHILDREN.

STANLEY SCHELL.

Costumes: Costumes represent American Flags of all sizes;

one boy as OLD GLORY. SCENE: Stage draped with flags. Children in line as soldiers

on R. side of stage; OLD GLORY facing them. OLD GLORY. Attention! [All stand erect and gaze at OLD

[
GLORY.] What day of the month is it?

FLAGS. February 12th.
OLD GLORY. Who's birthday is it?
Flags. Abraham Lincoln's.

OLD GLORY. Where is he buried?
FLAGS. Springfield, Illinois.

OLD GLORY. What did the people call him? (Watches them closely.) You don't know? [All FLAGS wave gently, then emphatically.) Then I'll tell you. It was "Honest Abe,” and Uncle Sam wants you to be like him. Now, I must know if you are good American flags. How many red stripes have you?

FLAGS. Seven.
OLD GLORY. How many white stripes ?
FLAGS. Six.
OLD GLORY. How many stars?

FLAGS. Forty-eight [shout large FLAGS; small FLAGS keep silent].

OLD GLORY. Ah, I see you know much that Uncle Sam wishes you to know. Now, march out and bring in every little boy you can find, and give every one a flag. [Flags exit, return at once with assortment of ragged and dirty boys.)

ONE FLAG. Please, Old Glory, these are the only ones we could find, and we think Uncle Sam wouldn't care to own them.

ANOTHER FLAG. Dirty.
ANOTHER FLAG. Ragged.
ANOTHER FLAG. Black.
ANOTHER FLAG. Can't speak English.
ANOTHER FLAG. Bootblack.
ANOTHER FLAG. Newsboy.
ANOTHER FLAG. Fiddler.
OLD

Old GLORY. These all belong to Uncle Sam who wanted me to speak to them and to you. Uncle Sam wants you to be brave and honest, for some day he may need you for soldiers. Uncle Sam wishes me to say to those that have no one to help them that President Lincoln was a poor boy too, and yet proved to be one of the grandest of all of Uncle Sam's sons. Follow his example.

[Finish with a marching drill.]

CIRCLE OF TRIBUTES TO LINCOLN.

STANLEY SCHELL.

CHARACTERS: THEODORE ROOSEVELT,

JAMES BRYCE,
M. J. J. JUSSERAND,
PORFIRIO DIAZ,
FIGUEROA ALCORTA,
WM. J. BRYAN,
HORACE PORTER,
GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN,
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON,
WOODROW Wilson,
JULIA WARD HOWE,
LYMAN ABBOTT,
UNCLE SAM.

TIME: Present.
STAGE SCENE: As curtain rises different characters are discov-

ered scattered about stage in groups talking. UNCLE SAM
waves stick and all take seats at each side of stage center

looking toward UNCLE SAM. UNCLE SAM. Friends, we are assembled to do honor to our dearly

beloved Abraham Lincoln. As years move on, we realize more and more all that he was, all that he did, and all that he means to the present generation. We shall be very glad to hear a few words from Theodore Roosevelt, Ex-President of the United States, about the man he has called “The Great

Heart of All." THEODORE ROOSEVELT. Dear Uncle Sam, I can but repeat a few

of the words I said when I laid the corner-stone of the memorial edifice that marks the sacred cabin-site of Lincoln's birthplace. We are beyond measure fortunate in the characters of the two greatest of our public men, Washington and Lincoln. Widely though they differed in externals, they were alike in essentials, they were alike in the great qualities which

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rendered each able to render service to his nation and to all mankind such as no other man of his generation could or did render. Widely though the problems of to-day differ from the problems set for solution to Washington when he founded this nation, to Lincoln when he saved it and freed. the slave, yet the qualities they showed in meeting these problems are exactly the same as those we should show in doing

our work to-day. UNCLE SAM

A noble tribute, my boy, a noble tribute. We shall now hear from Ambassador James Bryce of England. JAMES BRYCE. To you, citizens of the United States, Lincoln is.

the President who carried you through a terrible conflict and saved the Union. To us in England he is one of the heroes of the race whence you and we spring. We honor his memory as you do, and it is fitting that one who is privileged here to represent the land from which his forefathers came should bring on behalf of England a tribute of admiration for him and of thankfulness to the Providence which gave him to

you in your hour of need. UNCLE Sam. Your recognition of Lincoln is very acceptable. We

are thankful for what Providence did for us in our hour of need by sending us such a man. We shall now hear from Ambassador Jusserand of France. France has always been a good friend to us and any word from her will add to our

indebtedness. M. J. J. JUSSERAND. When Lincoln was slain, the whole I rench

nation was united in feeling. A wave of sympathy covered the whole country. A gold medal was presented to Mrs. Lincoln. In order that it might be a truly national offering, no one was permitted to subscribe more than two cents. The medal bore the words: “Dedicated by French Democracy to Lincoln, honest man, who abolished slavery, reëstablished the Union, saved the Republic, without veiling the Statue of Liberty.”

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