The World We Want: Restoring Citizenship in a Fractured Age

封面
Rowman & Littlefield, 2001 - 252 頁
What does it mean to be a citizen in a world of fractured identities and crumbling nationalism--when people are withdrawing into consumerism, cultural separatism, and self-regarding isolation? Citizenship meets one of our deepest needs, the need to belong; it also makes concrete the ethical commitments of care and respect. Political and cultural theorist Mark Kingwell traces the history of the idea of citizenship, and argues for a new model for the next century. In the style of Michael Ignatieff's The Needs of Strangers, he takes a long look at what citizenship has meant in the past and what it means today.
 

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The world we want: restoring citizenship in a fractured age

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In his sixth book, political-cultural theorist Kingwell (philosophy, Univ. of Toronto; Better Living: In Pursuit of Happiness from Plato to Prozac) poses the question of what citizenship means in an ... 閱讀評論全文

內容

THE WORLD WE HAVE
1
RIGHTS AND DUTIES
24
The Evil of Banality
48
Hopes Imagination
65
VIRTUES AND VICES
75
Challenges to Virtue
91
The Pact of Civility
110
SPACES AND DREAMS
134
Postcultural Identities
154
Places to Dream
175
THE WORLD WE WANT
198
BIBLIOGRAPHIC ESSAY
223
COPYRIGHT ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
241
INDEX
243
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
251
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關於作者 (2001)

Mark Kingwell is professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto and an award winning political and cultural theorist. A prolific journalist, he writes regularly for such publications as Utne Reader, New York Times Magazine, and Harper's. Kingwell has published five books including Better Living: In Pursuit of Happiness from Plato to Prozac, Marginalia: A Cultural Reader, and the Canadian bestseller Canada: Our Century.

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