New Hampshire Without Provincial Government. 1689-1690: An Historical Sketch

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University Press, J. Wilson and son, 1880 - 13 頁
 

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第 8 頁 - Majesties' subjects ; a thing they will continue to do so long as they have any considerable fortified fort or harbor near us. The commissioners therefore recommend that in the United Colonies and Provinces in these parts his Majesty's declaration of war against France be forthwith published, and that care be taken that the militia be well settled, and the fortifications in sea-port towns be made fit for service. They also recommend that a committee of fit persons be appointed to inquire into the...
第 9 頁 - Cranfield. To give their act the greatest force and authority, each and every member of the Convention set his hand to the instrument on which was drawn the form of the new provincial government. This celebrated document, the only remaining record of the Convention now known, is in the handwriting of John Pickering, a lawyer of Portsmouth, and a member of the Conventiou.J Having finished its labors, the Convention ad• NH Prov.
第 12 頁 - ... the common enemy, Resolved, That a President and Council, consisting of ten persons, as also a Treasurer and Secretary, be chosen in the Province, in manner and form following : viz., for the Council, three persons of the inhabitants of Portsmouth, three persons of the inhabitants of Hampton, two persons of the inhabitants of Dover, and two persons of the inhabitants of Exeter ; which persons shall be chosen by the major vote of the inhabitants of the town where they live, and the President,...
第 10 頁 - On the thirtieth day of January, 1690, six days after the adoption of the form of government, a town meeting was held in Dover to choose two members of the Council, and to vote for President, Secretary, and Treasurer. Captain John Gerrish and Captain John Woodman, two leading citizens, were elected members of the Council. The votes for the other provincial officers were given and sealed up to be opened by the commissioners and counted with the votes of the other towns.§ About the same time, a town...
第 12 頁 - Allen as Governor of the Province was published there August 13, 1692* During this period of suspended government over the Province, only one act of violence appears against any of the officers appointed by Andros. Richard Chamberlain was Secretary from 1680 to 1686, when the government of Joseph Dudley was extended over the Province, and that office abolished. He was then made clerk of the judicial courts, and held that office till the government of Andros was withdrawn. The records and files of...
第 5 頁 - Regiment." t A few hours after this memorable tragedy had ended, six of the principal gentlemen of Portsmouth received from Richard Waldron, Jr., a brief account in writing of what had befallen his venerable father and others at Cochecho, by the hands of the barbarous Indians. They immediately wrote a joint letter to Major Pike at Salisbury, the nearest military commander in Massachusetts, enclosing this account of the disaster, for the Governor and Council, and requesting assistance in this exigency...
第 11 頁 - This petition was quickly taken to Boston by John Pickering and William Vaughan, and was presented to the Governor and Council on the twenty-eighth day of February. It was received, and the prayer of the petitioners granted. The Governor and Council forthwith appointed William Vaughan, Richard Martyn, and Nathaniel Fryer, known adherents to the Colony, magistrates over the Province; and Vaughan then and there took the oath of office.! Order was given for the towns to make choice of civil and military...
第 8 頁 - ... commissioners.* Near the end of October the several towns held meetings and voted for a commissioner of the United Colonies of New England, an act that gives the Province new importance in history. The votes of the towns were sent to Portsmouth, and it appeared that William Vaughan was elected commissioner...
第 9 頁 - At this juncture of affairs, Portsmouth, Dover, and Exeter came to an understanding that each should choose commissioners with full power to meet in joint convention and devise "some method of government in order to their defence against the common enemy." Hampton seems to have been unreasonably jealous of the other towns, and to have delayed action in the matter of providing a provincial government. This applies to part, not all the inhabitants. Portsmouth, Dover, and Exeter elected their commissioners...
第 13 頁 - Deputy to be : or together with the representatives aforesaid, or the major part of them, from time to time shall make such acts and orders, and exert such powers and authority as may in all respects have a tendency to the preservation of the peace, punishment of offenders, and defence of their Majesties...

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