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WHEN

ON THE SOREGOING DIVINE POEMS *. For then we know how rain it was to boaft

Of fleeting things, so certain to be loft. HEN we for age could neither read nor Clouds of affection from our youngo cyes write,

Conceal that emptiness, which age descries. The subject made us able to indite;

The soul's dark cottage, batter'd and decay's The foul, with nobler resolutions deckt,

Lets in new light, through chinks that time has 'The body stooping, does herself ered:

made : No mortal parts are requisite to raise

Stronger by weakness, wiser men become, Her, that unbody'd can her Maker praise. As they draw near to their eternal home:

The feas are quiet, when the winds give o’er: Leaving the old, both worlds at once they vicx, So, calm are we, when pasions are no more! That stand upon the threshold of the new.

* See, in “ Duke's Poems,” an elegant compliment to Mr. Waller, on this his last produc

« **** Miratur limen Olympi." Yrke: tion. N.

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EPIGRAMť.

TO ONE MARRIED TO AN OLD XAN. SED EDIBUS emigrans folitis, comitatus inermi

INCE thou wouldīt needs (bewitch'd w SIN

fome ill charms!)
Rex turbâ, fimplex et diadema gerens,
Ecce redit bino Carolus diademate cincius;

Be buried in those monumental arms :
Hæc ubi nuca dedit pompa ; quid arma dabunt? All we can wish, is-May that earth lie light

Ed. Waller, Armiger, Coll. Regal. Upon thy tender limbs! and so good night!

Such

UNDER A LADY'S PICTURE.

AN EPIGRAM

ON A PAINTED LADY WITH ILL TEITI. UCH Helen was! and who can blame the #boy

ERE men so dull they could not see That in so bright a flame consum'd his Troy? But, had like virtue shin'd in that fair Greck,

Like simple birds, into a net, The amorous shepherd had not dar'd to seck, So grossly woven, and ill fet? Or hope for pity, but, with silent moan,

Her cwn tecth would undo the knot,
And better fate, had perished alone.

And let ali go that she had got.
Those teeth fair Lycé must not show,
If she would bite : her lovers, though
Like birds they stoop at seeming grapes,
Are disabus'd when first she gapes :
The rotten bones discover'd there,

Shew 'tis a painted sepulchre.
WHILE

HILE fue pretends to make the graces
Of matchless Mira, she reveals her own :
And, when she would another's praise indite,
Is by her glass instruccd how to write.

EPIGRAM UPON THE GOLDEN MEDAL + From “ Rex Redux;" being Cambridge | Oud

UR guard upon the royal side! verses on the return of Charles I. from Scotland,

On the reverse, our beauty's pride! after his coronation there in 1633.

Here we discern the frown and smile ; # Paris.

The force and glory of our Ide.

OY A LADY WHO WRIT IN PRAISE OF MIRA.

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O MR. GRANVILLE (AFTERWARDS LORD LANDS

DOWN) ON HIS VERSES TO KING JAMES 11. AN N early plant, which such a blossom bears,

And thews a genius so beyond his years; judgment! that could make so fair a choice;. high a subject, to employ his voice : ill as it grows, how sweetly will he sing he growing greatness of our matchless King!

IN THE YEAR 1674. THAT the Firft Charles does here in triumpk See his Son reign, where he a Martyr dy'd; And people pay that reverence, as they pass, (Which then he wanted!) to the facred brass; Is not th' effect of gratitude alone, To which we owe the statue and the stone. But Heaven this lasting monument has wrought, That mortals may eternally be taught, Rebellion, though successful, is but vain ; And Kings so kill'd rise conquerors again, This truth the royal image does proclaim, Loud as the trumpet of surviving Fame.

LONG AND SHORT LIFE.

VIRCLES are prais'd, not that abound * In largeness, but th' exactly round: , life we praise, that does excel t.in much time, but acting well.

P R 1 D E..

OT the brave + Macedonian Youth alone;

RANSLATED OUT OF SPANISH.

THOUGH we may seem importunate,

While your compassion we implore : y, whom you make too fortunate, -lay with presumption vex you more.

RANSLATED OUT OF FRENCH. ADE, flowers, fade, nature will have it so;

'Tis but what we must in our autumn do! 1, as your leaves lie quiet on the ground,

loss alone by those that lov'd them found : in the grave, shall we as quiet lie; 'd by some few that lov'd our company. some so like to thorns and nettles live, t none for them can, when they perish, grieve.

* Queen Catharine.

Boundless in power, would make himself a God;
As if the world depended on his nod.
The $ Syrian King to beasts was headlong thrown,
Ere to himself he could be mortal known.
The meanest wretch, if Heaven should give hirs

line,
Would never stop, till he were thought divine :
All might within discern the serpent's pride,
If from ourselves nothing ourselves did hide.
Let the proud peacock his gay feathers fpread,
And woo the female to his painted bed:
Let winds and feas together rage and swell,
'This nature teaches, and becomes them well.
|| Pride was not made for men: a conscious fense
Of guilt and folly, and their consequence,
Destroys the claim: and to beholders tells,
Here nothing, but the fhape of manbood, dwells.

+ Alcxander. Nebuchadnezzar. | Ecclus. X, 18.

UNDER

H

EPITAPH ON SIR GEORGE SPEKE. Where Ca’endith fought, the Royalifts prevail'd;

Neither his courage nor his judgment fail'd : (NDER this stone lies virtue, youth, The current of his

victories found no stop, Unblemish'd probity, and truth:

Till Cromwell came, his party's chiefeft prop. Just unto all relations known,

Equal success had set these champions high, A worthy patriot, pious fon :

And both resolv'd to conquer or to die : Whom neighbouring towns so often sent, Virtue with rage, fury with valour, itrore; To give their sense in Parliament ;

But that must fail which is decreed above! With lives and fortunes trusting one,

Cromwell, with odds of numbers and of fate, Who so discreetly us’d his own.

Remov'd this bulwark of the Church and State: Sober he was, wise, temperate ;

Which the sad issue of the war declar'd, Contented with an old eftate,

And made his talk, to ruin both, leís hard. Which no foul avarice did increase,

So when the bank negleAed is o'erthrown, Nor wanton luxury make less.

The boundless torrent does the country droo While yet but young, his father dy'd,

Thus fell the young, the lovely, and the brave; And left him to an happy guide :

Strew bays and flowers upon his honour'd grave! Not Lemuel's mother with more care Did counsel or instruct her heir ; Or teach with more success her son The vices of the time to thun.

EPITAPH ON THE LADY SEDLET. An heiress The; while yet alive, All that was her's to him did give :

JERE lies the learned Savil's heir; And he just gratitude did show

So early wise, and lasting fair ! To one that had oblig'd him so :

That none, except her years they told, Nothing too much for her he thought,

Thought her a child, or thought her old. By whom he was so bred and taught,

All that her father knew, or got, So (early made that path to tread,

His art, his wealth, fell to her lot: Which did his youth to honour lead)

And the so well improv'd that stock, His short life did a pattern give,

Both of his knowledge and his flock: How neighbours, husbands, friends, should live. That Wit and Fortune, reconcil'd The virtues of a private life

In her, upon each other smil'd. Exceed the glorious noise and strife,

While the to every well-taught mind Of battles won : in those we find

Was so propitiously inclin’d, The folid interest of mankind.

And gave such title to her store, Approy'd by all, and lov'd so well,

That none, but th' ignorant, were poor. Though young, like fruit that's ripe, he fell.

The Muses daily found supplies,
Both from her hands and from her eyes ;
Her bounty did at once engage,

And matchless beauty warm their rage.
EPITAPH

Such was this dame in calmer days, ON COLONEL CHARLES CAVENDISH. Her nation's ornament and prajfe!

But when a storm disturbid our rest, SERE lies Charles Ca’endith : let the marble The port and refuge of th' oppreft.

This made her fortune understood, That hides his alhes, make his virtue known.

And look'd on as some public good; Beauty and valour did his short life grace ;

So that (her person and her state The grief and glory of his noble race!

Exempted from the common fate) Early abroad he did the world survey,

In all our civil fury the As if he knew he had not long to stay:

Stood, like a sacred temple, free. Saw what great Alexander in the Eaft,

May here her monument stand so, And mighty Julius conquer'd in the west.

To credit this rude age! and show

To future times, that even we
Then, with a mind as great as thcirs, he came
To find at home occafion for his fame :

Some patterns did of virtue fee:
Where dark confusion did the nations hide,

And one sublime example had And where the juster was the weaker fide.

of good, among so many bad. Two loyal brothers took their Sovereign s part, Employ'd their wealth, their courage, and their

EPIT A PH The * elder did whole regiments afford; The younger brought his condus and his sword. TO BE WRITTEN UNDER THE LATIX INC Born to command, a leader he begun,

TOMB OF "THE OXLT 5 And on the rei els laiting lionour won : The Horse, instructed by their General's worth, Still made the King victorious in the North :

VIS fit the English reader frould be told,

In our own language, what this tomb ccm # William Earl of Devonshire.

hold,

HERE stone,

art:

TION UPON THE
OF THE LORD ANDOVER

'T"

'Tis not a noble corpse alone does lie

Ε Ρ Ι Τ Α Ρ Η
Under this stone, but a whole family:

ON HENRY DUNCH, ESQ;
His parents' pious care, their name, their joy,
And all their hope, lies buried with this boy :

IN NEWINGTON CHURCH IN OIIORDSHIRE,
This lovely youth! for whom we all made moan,
That knew his worth, as he had been our own.

1686. Had there been

ERE the prop and glory of race, We had not found, in all the numerous roll Of his fam'd ancestors, a greater soul :

His grateful wife, under this speaking stone

His afhes hid, to make his merit known.
His early virtues to that ancient stock
Gave as much honour as from thence he took. Sprung from an opulent and worthy line,

Whose well-us'd fortune made their virtues shine.
Like buds appearing ere the frosts are past,
To become man he made fuch fatal hafte;

A rich example his fair life did give,

How others should with their relations live. And to perfe&tion labour'd so to climb, Preventing flow experience and time;

A pious son, a husband, and a friend, That 'tis no wonder death our hopes beguild:

To neighbours too his bounty did extend
He's seldom old, that will not be a child.

So far, that they lamented when he died,
As if all to him had been near allied.
His curious youth would men and manners know,

Which made him to the southern nations go.
EPITAPH, UNFINISHED.

Nearer the sun, though they more civil seem,

Revenge and luxury have their esteem; REAT foul! for whom death will no longer | Value for England than he had before ;

Which well observing, he return'd with more stay, But sends in hafte to snatch our bliss away.

Her true religion, and her statutes too, O cruel death! to those you take more kind,

He practised not less than seek'd to know; Than to the wretched mortals left behind !

And the whole country griev'd for their ill fate, Here beauty, youth, and noble virtue thin'd;

To lose so good, so just a magistrate. Free from the clouds of pride that shade the mind, To shed a tear may readers be inclin’d, Inspir'd verse may on this marble live,

And pray for one he only left behind;
But can no honour to thy alhes give.-

Till me who does inherit his estate,
May virtue love like him, and vices hate.

G

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ON M R.

W ALLER'S MONUMENT,

In Beaconsfield Church-yard, in Buckinghamshire ;
WRITTEN BY MR. RYMER, LALE HISTORIOGRAPHER-ROYAL.

ON THE WEST IND.
EDMUNDI WALLER HIC JACET ID
QUANTUM MORTI CESSIT; QUI INTER

POETAS SUI TEMPORIS FACILE
PRINCEPS, LAUREAM, QUAM MERUIT
ADOLESCENS, OCTOGENARIUS HAUD

ABDICAVIT HUIC DEBET PATRIA
LINGUA QUOD (REDAS, SI GRÆCE
LATINEQUE INTERMITTERENT, MUSE

LOQUI AMARENT ANGLICE.

ON THE SOUTH SIDE.
HEUS, VIATOR! TUMULATUM VIDES
EDMUNDUM WALLER, QUI TANTI

NOMINIS POETA, ET IDEM AVITIS
OPIBUS, INTER PRIMOS SPECTABILIS,

MUSIS SE DEDIT, . ET PATRIÆ,
NONDUM OCTODECENNALIS, INTER
ARDUA REGNI TRACTANTES SEDEM
HABUIT, A BURGO DE AGMONDESHAM

MISSUS. HIC VITÆ CURSUS; NEC

ONERI DEFUIT SENEX; VIXITQUE
SEMPER POPULO CHARUS, PRINCIPIBUS

IN DELICIIS, ADMIRATIONI OMNIBUS.
HIC CONDITUR TUMULO SUB EODEM

RARA VIRTUTF ET MULTA PROLE
NOBILIS UXOR, MARIA EX BRESSYORUM

FAMILIA, CUM EDMUNDO WALLER,
CONJUGE CHARISSIMO: QUEM TER ET
DECIES LÆTUM FECIT PATREM, V FILIIS,

FILIABUS VIII; QUOS MUNDO
DEDIT. ET IN COELUM REDIIT.

ON THE EAST END.
EDMUNDUS WALLER CUI HOC MARMOR
SACRUM EST, COLESHILL NASCENDI

LOCUM HABUIT; CANTABRIGIAM
STUDENDI; PATREM ROBERTUM ET

EX HAMPDENA STIRPE MATREM:
COEPIT VIVERE III° MARTII, A.D. MDCV.
PRIMA UXOR ANNA EDWARDI BANKS
FILIA UNICA HÆRES. EX PRIMA BIS

PATER FACTUS; EX SECUNDA
TREDECIES; CUI ET DUO LUSTRA
SUPERSTES, OBIIT XXI OCTOB.

A. D. MDCLXXXVII.

ON THE NORTH SIDE.
HOC MARMORE EDMUNDO WALLER
MARIÆQUE EX SECUNDIS NUPTIIS
CONJUGI, PIENTISSIMIS PARENTIBUS,

PIISSIME PARENTAVIT EDMUNDUS
FILIUS HONORES BENE - MERENTIBUS
EXTREMOS DEDIT QUOS IPSE FUGIT.
EL, W. 1. F. H. G. EX TESTAMENTO

H. M. P. IN JUL. MDCC.

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