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1 Capt. By th' mass, a good round virgin; Eum. He must lie with you, lady. And, at first sight, resembling. She's well Court. Let him; hie's nol ihe first man I cloath'd too.

have lain with, Eum. But is she sound?

Nor shall not be the last. 2 Capt. Of wind and limb, I warrant her. Eum. You are instructed, lady?

Enter Memnon. Court. Yes; and know, Sir,

2 Capt. He comes; no more words; [her! How to behave myself, ne'er fear.

She has her lesson throughly. How he views Eum. Polybius,

Eum. Go forward now; so! bravely; stand! Where did he get this vermin?

Mem. Great lady, i Capt. Hang him, badger!

How humbly I am boundThere's not a hole free from hin; whores Court. You shall not kneel, Sir. (soldier; and whores' mates

Come, I have done you wrong. Stand, mý Do all pay him obedience.

And thus I make amends.

[kisses him. Eum. Indeed, i'th' war

Eum. A plague confound you!
His quarter was all whore, whore upon whore, Is this your state?
And lin'd with whore. Beshrew me, 'tis a fair 2 Capt. 'Tis well enough.
whore.

Mem. Oh, lady,

[beauty, 1 Capt. She has smock'd away her blood : Your royal hand, your hand, my dearesi but, fair or foul,

Is more than I must purchase! Here, divine Or blind or lame, that can but lift her leg up, I dare revenge my wrongs.—Ha ! [one, Comes not amiss to him; he rides like a night i Capt. A damn'd foul one. All ages, all religions.

[mare, Eum. The lees of bawdy prunes, so mourning Eum. Can you state it?

gloves! Court. I'll make a shift.

All spoil'd, by Heav'n. The lees of lawdy prewns ) This reading obtained till 1750; when the modest and judicious Editors of that æra chose to substitute breuis for prewns. Though they may stand excused for not understanding the expression, bawdy PREWNs, whence had they the right of introducing lirewis, without the least notice given to their readers? That prunes is the right word (while breuis is devoid of meaning) appears bevond a doubt. Memnon, taking the hand of the counterfeit princess, expresses a surprise; which Eumenes explains the cause of, by supposing he had discovered the lees of tawdy Prawns upon it. Steued prewens were the constant appendages of a brothel in our Authors

' time: The last Editor of Shakespeare, in his notes on the First Part of Henry IV. act iii. scene iii. furnishes the following proofs of this fact:

• Dr. Lodge, in his pamphlet called Wit's Miserie, or the World's Madnesse, 1596, describes a bawd thus: • This is shee that laies wait at all the carriers for wenches new come

up to London; and you shall know her dwelling by a dish of stew'd prunes in the window, “ and two or three fleering wenches sit knitting or sowing in her shop.

• In Measure for Measure, act ii. the male bawd.excuses himself for having admitted El• bow's wife into his house, by saying, that she came in great with child, and longing for stew'd prunes, which stood in a dish,' &c.

• Slender, who apparently wishes to recommend himself to his mistress by a seeming propensity to love as well as war, talks of having measured weapons with a fencing-master for a dish of steu'd prunes.'

• In another old dramatic piece, entitled, If this be not a Good Play the Divel is in it, • 1613, a bravo enters with money, and says, “ This is the pension of the stews, you need not “ untie it; 'tis stew-money, Sir, stew'd prune cash, Sir.'

• Among the other sins laid to the charge of the once celebrated Gabriel Hervey, by his antagonist Nash, 'to be drunk with the sirrop or liquor of stew'd prunes,' is not the least insisted on.

• In The Knave of Hearts, a collection of satirical poems, 1612, a whoring knave is mentioned, as taking

• Burnt wine, stew'd prunes, a punk to solace him.' • In The Knave of Spades, another collection of the same kind, 1011, is the following description of a wanton inveigling a young man into her house;

He to his liquor falls,
• While she unto her maids for cakes,

Stew'd prunes, and pippins, calls.' • So, in Every Woman in her Humour, a comedy, 1619. •To search my house! I have “no varlets, no stew'd prunes, no she fiery,' &c.

The passages already quoted are sufficient to shew that a dish of stew'd prunes was not only the ancient designation of a brothel, but the constant appendage to it. From A Treatise on the Lues Venerea, written by W. Clowes, one of her majesty's

surgeons,

Mem. Ha! who art thou?

He'll do you reverence; else i Capt. A shame on you,

Court. I beseech your lordship You clawing scabby whore!

Eum. He'll tear her all to pieces.61 Mem. I say, who art thou?

Court. I am no princess, Sir. Eum. Why, 'tis the princess, Sir.

Mem. Who brought thee hither? Mem. The devil, Sir!

2 Cape. If you confess, we'll hang you. 'Tis soine rogue thing.

Court. Good my lord--Court. If this abuse be love, Sir,

Mem. Who art thou then? Or I, that laid aside my modesty

Court. A poor retaining whore, Sir, Eum. So far thou'lt never find it.

To one of your lordship's captains. Mem. Do not weep;

Mem. Alas, poor whore! For, if you be the princess, I will love you, Go; be a whore still, and stink worse. Ha, Indeed I will, and honour you, fight for you:

ha, ha!

[Exit Courtezan. Come, wipe your eyes. By Heav'n, she stinks! What fools are these, and coxcombs! Who art thou?

[Exit Memnon. Stinks like a poison'd rat behind a hanging. Eum. I am right glad yet, Woman, who art?-Like a rotten cabbage. He takes it with such lightness, 2 Capt. You're much to blame, Sir; 'tis i Capt Methinks his face too the princess.

Is not so clouded as it was. How he looks! Mem. How !

Eum. Where's your dead rat? She the princess?

2 Capt. The devil dine upon her! Eum. And the loving princess.

Lions? Why, what a medicine had he 1 Cupt. Indeed, the doting princess.

gotten Mom. Come hither once more;

To try a whore! The princess smells like morning's breath, pure amber,

Enter Stremon.
Beyond the courted India in her spices.-
Still a dead rat, by Heaven! Thou a princess? Stre. Here's one from Polydor stays to speak

Eum. What a dull whore is this?
Mem. I'll tell you presently;

Eum. With whom?

[been? For, if she be a princess, as she may be

Stre. With all. Where has the general And yet stink too, and strongly, I shall find He's laughing to himself extremely. her.

Eum. Come, Fetch the Numidian lion I brought over: I'll tell thee how ; I'm glad yet he's so merry. If she be sprung from th' royal blood—the

[Ereunt, lion!

with ye.

ACT V.

Chi. 'Tis the devil,
Enter Chilax and Priestess.

To claw us for our catterwauling.
Chi. WHAT lights are those that enter Priest. Retire sofily:
there? Still nearer?

I did not look for you these two hours, lady, Plague o' your rotten itch! do you draw me Beshrew your haste!—That way. [To Chilar. hither

Chi. That goes to th' altar, Into the temple, to betray me? Was there no You old blind beast! place

Priest. I know not; any way. To satisfy your sin in—Gods forgive me! Still they come nearer.

I'll in to tli' oracle. Still they come forward.

Chi. That's well remember'd; I'll in with Priest. Peace, you fool! I have found it:

you. 'Tis the young princess Calis.

Priest. Da.

[Exeunt, surgeons, 1596, and other books of the same kind, it appears that prunes were directed to be boiled in broth for those persons already infected, and that both stewed prunes and roasted • apples were commonly, though unsuccessfully, taken by way of prevention.'

Mr. Steevens's note is upon the words, • There's no more faith in thee than in a stou'd 'prune.

R. 67 Eum. He'll tear her all to pieces.] This is given to Eumenes in all the editions, when it is evidently the conclusion of Memnon's speech. Seward.

The speech belongs to Eumenes; had it been Memnon's, it would run, He'll dear you

all to pieces.

Chi. Do you hear that? Enter Calis and her train, with lights, sing Priest. Yes; lie close. ing: Lucippe and Cleanthe.

Chi. A wildfire take you! [now!

What shall become of me? I shall be hang'd SONG.

Is this a time to shake? a halter shake you! Oh, fair sweet goddess, queen of loves,

Come up and juggle, come. Soft and gentle as thy doves,

Priest, I'm monstrous fearful! Humble-ey'd, and ever ruing

Chi. Up, you old gaping oyster, up and

answer! Those poor hearts, their loves pursuing!

[me Oh, thou mother of delights,

A mouldy mange upon your chaps! You told Crowner of all happy nights,

I was safe here till the bell rung, Star of dear content and pleasure,

Priest. I was prevented, [princess.

And did not look these three hours for the Of mutual loves the endless treasure !

Chi. Shall we be taken?
Accept this sacrifice we bring,
Thou continual youth and spring,

Priest. Speak, for love's sake, Chilas! Grant this lady her desires,

I cannot, nor I dare not.

Chi. I'll speak treason, And ev'ry hour we'll crown thy fires.

For I had as lieve be hang'd for that

Priest. Good Chilax!
Enter a Nun.

Chi. Must it be sung or said? What shall Nun. You about her, all retire,

I tell 'em?
Whilst the princess feeds the fire. They're here; here now, preparing.
When

your
devotions ended be

Priest. Oh, my conscience!
To th' oracle I will attend ve.

Chi Plague o' your spur-gall'd conscience! [Exit Nun, and draws the curtain

does it tire now, close to Calis.

Now when it should be toughest? I could

make theeEnter Stremon and Eumenes.

Priest. Save us! we're both undone else. Stre. Ile will abroad.

Chi. Down, you dog then! Eum. How does his humour hold him?

Be quiet, and be stanch too; no inundations. Stre. He's now grown wondrous sad, weeps

Nun. Here kneel again; and Venus grant often tou,

[ly. Talks of his brother to himself, starts strange

Colis, Oh, divinest 8 star of Heav'n, Eum. Does he not curse?

Thou in pow'r above the seven: Stre. No.

Thou sweet kindler of desires, Eum. Nor break out in fury,

'Till they grow to mutual fires: Off'ring some new attempt?

Thou, oh, gentle queen, that art Stre. Neither. “To th’ temple,'

Curer of each wounded heart:

Thou the fuel, and the flame; Is all we hear of now: What there he will do

[him.

Thou in Heav'n, and here the saine: Eum. I hope repent his folly; let's be near

Thou the woocr, and the woo'd: Stre. Where are the rest?

Thou the hunger, and the food : Eum. About a business

[madness,

Thou the prayer, and the pray'd; Concerns him mainly; if Heav'n cure this

Thou what is, or shall be said: He's man for ever, Stremon.

Thou still young, and golden tressed, Stre. Does the king know it?

Make me by thy answer blessed!

Chi. When? Eum. Yes, and much troubled with it, he's

[by all means; Priest. Now speak handsomely, and small I have told

you

what. To seek his sister out.

[Thunder. Stre. Come, let's then. away

Chi. But I'll tell you a new tale. [Exeunt.

Now for my neck-verse. I have heard thy Enter Noon, she opens the curtain to Calis.

pray'rs,

And mask me well,
Calis at the oracle.
Pea
to your prayers, lady! Will it

Music, Venus descends.
please you
To pass on to the oracle?

Nun. The goddess is displeased much; Calis. Most humbly.

The temple shakes and totiera: She appears, [Chilax and Priestess in the oracle.

Bow, lady, bow! 68 O divine star of Heav'n.) Former editions,

Scward. C9 Now for my neck-verse.) When a person formerly had the benefit of clergy allowed him, he was obliged to read, and one verse was always selected for that purpose. It was that containing the words miserere mei Deus, which, from that circumstance, obtained the name of the neck-verse. R.

your wishes!

now gone

Verus. Purge me the temple round, And ten to one appearing thus unto him, And live by this example henceforth sound. He worries me.

I must go by him. Virgin, I have seen thy tears,

Eum. Sir? Heard thy wishes, and thy fears;

Mem. Ask me no further questions. What Thy holy' incense few above,

art thou? Hark, therefore, to thy doom in love: How dost thou stare? Stand off! Nay, look Had thy heart been soft at first,

upon me, Now thou hadst allay'd thy thirst; I do not shake, nor fear thee. Had thy stubborn will but bended,

[Draws his sword. All thy sorrows here had ended;

Chi. He will kill me: Therefore to be just in love,

This is for chorch-work. A strange fortune thou must prore;

Mem. Why dost thou appear now? And, for thou'st been stern and coy, Thou wert fairly slain. I know thee, Diocles, A dead love thou shalt enjoy.

And know thine envy to mine honour:

But Calis. Oh, gentle goddess !

Chi. Stay, Memnon, Venus. Rise, thy doom is said,

I am a spirit, and thou canst not hurt me. And fear not; I shall please thee with the Eum. This is the voice of Chilax. dead.

[Ascends. Stre. What makes he thus? Nun. Go up into the temple, and there end Chi. "Tis true that I was slain in field, but Your holy rites; the goddess smiles upon you. foully,

[ınark me, (Exeunt Calis and Nun. By multitudes, not manhood: Therefore, Enter Chilax in his robe.

I do appear again to quit inine honour,

And on thee single.
Chi. I'll no more oracles, nor miracles, Mem. I accept the challenge.
Nor no more church-work; I'll be drawn and Where?
hang'd first.

Chi. On the Stygian banks.
Am not I torn a-pieces with the thunder? Mem. When?
Death, I can scarce believe I live yet!

Chi. Four days hence. It gave me on the buttocks a cruel, a huge Mem. Go, noble ghost, I will attend. bang!

[whips.

Chi. I thank you. I had as lieve ha' had 'em scratch'd with dog Stre. You've sav'd your throat, and hand. Be quiet henceforth, now ye feel the end on't, somely. Farewell, Sir. [Exit Chilax. I would advise ye, my old friends; the good Mcm. Sing me the battle of Pelusium, gentlewoman

(mumping In which this worthy died. Is strucken dumb, and there her grace sits Eum. This will spoil all, [down, Sir, Like an old ape eating brawn. Sure the good And make him worse than e'er he was. Sit goddess

[princess, And give yourself to rest. Knew my intent was honest, to save the And how we young men are entic'd to wick

SONG. edness

[too. By these lewd women; I had paid fort else Arm, arm, arm, arm! the scouts are all I'm monstrous holy now, and cruel fearful.

come in.

[nours win. Oh, 'twas a plaguy thump, charg’d with a Keep your ranks close, and now your liovengeance!

Behold from yonder hill the foe appears ;

Bows, bills, glaves, arrows, shields, and (Enter Siphar, walks softly over the stage,

spears;

(pouring; 70 and goes in.)

Like a dark wood he comes, or tempest 'Would I were well at home! The best is, Oh, view the wings of horse the meadows 'tis not day.

[anon, Sir.

scouring Who's that? ha! Siphax? I'll be with you The van-guard marches bravely. Hark, the You shall be oracled, I warrant you,

drums!

Dub, dub. And thunder'd too, as well as I; your lordship They meet, they meet, and now the battle (Enter Memnon, Eumenes, Stremon, and

See how the arrows fly, two servants carrying torches.)

That darken all the sky; Must needs enjoy the princess? yes. Ha! Hark how the trumpets sound, torches?

[mad,

Hark how the hills rebound! And Memnon coming this way? He's dog

Tara, tara, tara, tara, tara. 90 Like a dark wood he comes, or tempest pouring.) Mr. Sympson would read cloud for wood; but I much prefer the old reading: The closeness and firmness of an army, the groves of spears, and the dark horror of the soldiers' looks, are all finely imaged in this simile of a dark wood moving. One might indeed quote several authors, Greek, Roman, and English, in support of both readings, but that is not at present my province. Seward. VOL. I.

3L

comes.

Chi. Do you hear that? Enter Calis and her train, with lights, sing Priest. Yes; lie close. ing: Lucippe and Cleanthe.

Chi. A wildfire take you!

[now! What shall become of me? I shall be hang'd SONG.

Is this a time to shake? a halter shake you! Oh, fair sweet goddess, queen of loves,

Come up and juggle, come.

Priest, I'm monstrous fearful!
Soft and gentle as thy doves,
Humble-ey'd, and ever ruing

Chi. Up, you old gaping oyster, up and

answer! Those poor hearts, their loves pursuing !

[me Oh, thou mother of delights,

A mouldy mange upon your chaps! You told Crowner of all happy nights,

I was safe here till the bell rung, Star of dear content and pleasure,

Priest. I was prevented,

[princess Of mutual loves the endless treasure!

And did not look these three hours for the

Chi. Shall we be taken?
Accept this sacrifice we bring,
Thou continual youth and spring,

Priest. Speak, for love's sake, Chilax!

I cannot, nor I dare not, Grant this lady her desires,

Chi. I'll speak treason, And ev'ry hour we'll crown thy fires.

For I had as lieve be hang'd for that

Priest. Good Chilax!
Enter a Nun.

Ch. Must it be sung or said? What shall Nun. You about her, all retire,

I tell 'em?
Whilst the princess feeds the fire. They're here; here now, preparing.
When

your
devotions ended be

Priest. Oh, my conscience!
To th' oracle I will attend ye.

Chi Plague o' your spur-gall'd conscience!
[Exit Nun, and draws the curtain does it lire now,
close to Calis.

Now when it should be toughest? I could

make theeEnter Stremon and Eumenes.

Priest. Save us! we're both undone else. Stre. He will abroad.

Chi, Down, you dog then! Eum. How does his humour hold him?

Be quiet, and be stanch too; no inundations. Stre. He's now grown wondrous sad,

Nun. Here kneel again; and Venus grant weeps

[ly. Talks of his brother to hiinself, starts strange

Calis. Oh, divinest 68 star of Heav’n, Eum. Does he not curse?

Thou in pow'r above the seven; Stre. No.

Thou sweet kindler of desires, Eum. Nor break out in fury,

'Till they grow to mutual fires: Ofl'ring some new attempt?

Thou, oh, gentle queen, that art

Curer of each wounded heart: Stre. Neither. “To th' temple,'

Thou the fuel, and the flame; Is all we hear of now: What there he will do

[him.

Thou in Heav'n, and here the saine:

Thou the wooer, and the wood: Eun. I hope repent his folly; let's be near Stre. Where are the rest?

Thou the hunger, and the food: Eum. About a business [madness,

Thou the prayer, and the pray'd; Concerns him mainly; if Heav'n cure this

Thou what is, or shall be said: He's man for ever, Stremon.

Thou still young, and golden tressed, Stre. Does the king know it?

Make me by thy answer blessed !

Chi. When? Eum. Yes, and much troubled with it, he's

[by all means;

Priest. Now speak handsomely, and small now gone

I have told you what. To seek his sister out.

Chi. But I'll tell you a new tale. Stre. Come, let's away then. [Exeunt.

Now for my neck-verse.co I have heard thy Enter Niin, she opens the curtain to Calis.

pray'rs,

And mask me well,
Calis at the oracle.
Nun. Peace to your prayers, lady! Will it

Music, Veniøs descends.
please you
To pass on to the oracle?

Nun. The goddess is displeased much; Calis. Most humbly.

The temple shakes and toiters: She appears. [Chilax and Priestess in the oracle. Bow, lady, bow

often too,

your wishes!

[Thunder

68 O divine star of Icar'n.) Former editions, Seward,

(9 Now for my neck-verse.) When a person formerly had the benefit of clergy allowed him, he was obliged to read, and one verse was always selected for that purpose. It was that containing the words miserere mei Deus, which, from that circumstance, oblained the name of the neck-verse,

R.

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