Alphabet of Scientific Chemistry, for the Use of Beginners

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W. Orr, 1833 - 193 頁
 

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第 xiv 頁 - ... capable of preservation for years, and ready to yield up their sustenance in the form best adapted to the support of life, on the application of that powerful agent, steam, which enters so largely into all our processes, or of an acid at once cheap and durable...
第 19 頁 - Why do those cliffs of shadowy tint appear More sweet than all the landscape smiling near ?— 'Tis distance lends enchantment to the view, And robes the mountain in its azure hue.
第 xiii 頁 - ... useless materials into important objects in the arts, are opening up to us, every day, sources of wealth and convenience of which former ages had no idea, and which have been pure gifts of science to man. Every department of art has felt their influence, and new instances are continually occurring, of the unlimited resources which this wonderful science developes in the most sterile parts of nature.
第 xiii 頁 - ... for the most part, of that generally intelligible and readily applicable kind, which demand no intense concentration of thought, and lead to no profound mathematical researches. The simple process of inductive generalization, grounded on the examination of numerous facts, all of them presenting considerable intrinsic interest, has sufficed, in most instances, to lead, by a clear and direct road, to its highest laws yet known. But, on the other hand, these laws, when stated, are not yet fully...
第 xiii 頁 - Who, for instance, would have conceived that linen rags were capable of producing more tlum their own weight of sugar, by the simple agency of one of the cheapest and mo'st abundant acids ? * — that dry bones could be a magazine of nutriment, capable of preservation for years, and ready to yield up their sustenance in the form best adapted to the support...
第 xv 頁 - ... the hand, placed in its usual position, and an inflamed taper introduced into it : the taper will burn with more brilliancy than in the atmosphere. This is an experiment. If the phenomena are reasoned upon, and the question is put, whether all vegetables of this kind, in fresh or in salt water, do not produce such air under like circumstances, the inquirer is guided by analogy; and, when this is determined to be the case by new...
第 107 頁 - ... to affirm that the sun is stationary, contrary to the apparent evidence of the senses ; yet the one is as well ascertained as the other. For example, at Ceylon, Dr.
第 xii 頁 - Chemistry is conversant; the violent activity often assumed by substances usually considered the most inert and sluggish; and above all, the insight it gives into the nature of innumerable operations which we see daily carried on around us, have contributed to render it the most popular, as it is one of the most extensively useful, of the sciences.
第 xiv 頁 - ... is susceptible of conversion into a substance bearing no remote analogy to bread ; and though certainly less palatable than that of flour, yet no way disagreeable, and both wholesome and digestible as well as highly nutritive? What economy, in all processes where chemical agents are employed, is introduced by the exact knowledge of the proportions in which natural elements unite, and their mutual powers of displacing each other ! What perfection in all the arts where fire is employed, either...
第 117 頁 - ... cold or frosty, we feel light and spirited ; because dry air is a slow conductor of electricity, and leaves us to enjoy its luxuries. In moist or rainy weather, we feel oppressed and drowsy ; because all moisture greedily absorbs our electricity, which is the buoyant cordial of the body. To remedy this inconvenience, we have only to discover a good non-conductor of electricity to prevent its escape from the body, and this we have in silk, which is so excellent a non-conductor, that the thunderbolt,...

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