The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, 第 10 卷

封面
Issued under the auspices of the Thomas Jefferson memorial association of the United States, 1903 - 479 頁
Volume five in the 20-book set of writings from Thomas Jefferson, this text includes the letters the president wrote while in Europe from 1784 until his return to the United States in 1789. This volume also includesJefferson as a Citizen of the Commonwealth of Virginia, an essay by Andrew J. Montague, Governor of Virginia.

搜尋書籍內容

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

熱門章節

第 175 頁 - I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.
第 vi 頁 - In every government on earth is some trace of human weakness, some germ of corruption and degeneracy, which cunning will discover, and wickedness insensibly open, cultivate and improve. Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves therefore are its only safe depositories. And to render even them safe, their minds must be improved to a certain degree.
第 ii 頁 - A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.
第 311 頁 - It completely reverses all the political relations of the United States, and will form a new epoch in our political course.
第 312 頁 - ... it impossible that France and the United States can continue long friends, when they meet in so irritable a position. They, as well as we, must be blind if they do not see this ; and we must be very improvident if we do not begin to make arrangements on that hypothesis.
第 iv 頁 - I think the best remedy is exactly that provided by all our constitutions, to leave to the citizens the free election and separation of the aristoi from the pseudo-aristoi, of the wheat from the chaff. In general they will elect the really good and wise. In some instances, wealth may corrupt, and birth blind them ; but not in sufficient degree to endanger the society.
第 415 頁 - Louisiana, as ceded by France to the United States, is made a part of the United States ; its white inhabitants shall be citizens, and stand, as to their rights and obligations, on the same footing with other citizens of the United States, in analogous situations.
第 114 頁 - According to these bases, you were right to assert that whatever plenipotentiary the Government of the United States might send to France to put an end to the existing differences between the two countries would be undoubtedly received with the respect due to the representative of a free, independent, and powerful nation.
第 iii 頁 - But words are things, and a small drop of ink, Falling like dew, upon a thought, produces That which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think...
第 217 頁 - The tough sides of our Argosy have been thoroughly tried. Her strength has stood the waves into which she was steered, with a view to sink her. We shall put her on her republican tack, and she will now show by the beauty of her motion the skill of her builders.

書目資訊